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Inside the GNOME 2.6 Desktop & Developer Platform
"GNOME has seen significantly wider adoption during the past six months. One of the largest announcements was China's decision to adopt Sun Microsystems' GNOME-based Java Desktop System on as many as 200 million desktops. The UK Government has also announced plans to use JDS over the next 5 years."
Story

( Permalink: Inside the GNOME 2.6 Desktop & Developer Platform      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 1, 2004 )

KDE's Till Adam
"About a year or so ago I sent some patches to the KMail list with stuff I missed when switching from mutt. They were warmly received and I kept fixing stuff I came across and adding small features. I got stuck pretty quickly, it's just too much fun."
Story

( Permalink: KDE's Till Adam      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 1, 2004 )

Linux Kernel 2.6: the Future of Embedded Computing
"With the release of kernel 2.6, Linux now poses serious competition to major RTOS vendors, such as VxWorks and WinCE, in the embedded market space. Linux 2.6 introduces many new features that make it an excellent operating system for embedded computing. Among these new features are enhanced real-time performance, easier porting to new computers, support for large memory models, support for microcontrollers and an improved I/O system. "
Story

( Permalink: Linux Kernel 2.6: the Future of Embedded Computing      Submitted by Noel Wed Mar 31, 2004 )

BUILDING A CLUSTER OF LOAD-BALANCED WEB SERVERS
"The purpose of this article is to explain how to build a cluster of load-balanced web servers using the 'nix distribution of your choice. The cluster I built was a personal project, built at home on a single cable modem connection with a dynamic IP address using discarded equipment. My objective was no more than to be the first kid on my block to have load-balanced servers running in his basement. The resulting complex serves a single copy of the html using a single cgi directory ..."
Story

( Permalink: BUILDING A CLUSTER OF LOAD-BALANCED WEB SERVERS      Submitted by Noel Wed Mar 31, 2004 )

OpenSSL Vulnerabilities
In this weeks Security Alerts, we look at problems in OpenSSL, Apache, sysstat, Mozilla, , ModSecurity, Samba, Crafty, UUDeview, metamail, and Calife.

( Permalink: OpenSSL Vulnerabilities      Submitted by Noel Wed Mar 31, 2004 )

Dogs of War: Securing Microsoft with Unix
"Chances are good that you've faced a similar situation if you've been a security professional within the past few years. The intense rise of spam along with viruses, worms and other malicious code (i.e. malware) has made operating a secure, efficient IT environment a real challenge. This article provides you with the tools and methodology for creating and sustaining a secure and robust mail environment, with a focus on defending an Exchange/Outlook based e-mail system."
Story

( Permalink: Dogs of War: Securing Microsoft with Unix      Submitted by Noel Wed Mar 31, 2004 )

Open source development using C99
What is C99? Who needs it? Is it available yet? The author discusses the 1999 revision of the ISO C standard, with a focus on the availability of new features on Linux and BSD systems.

( Permalink: Open source development using C99      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Mar 31, 2004 )

Mac OS X: Making The Switch
"Being an ubergeek I have always admired Apple’s physical design, but have avoided Macs in the past due to the operating system. Since I run linux (SuSE 9.0 AMD64) at home I was interested in OSX because of it’s BSD roots. I have tried linux on laptops in the past, but have never been happy with the stability of the hardware support."
Story

( Permalink: Mac OS X: Making The Switch      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Mar 31, 2004 )

Logitech Quickcam Pro 4000
"The wee little spherical camera sits on top of a triangle, and looks like some sort of alien space thing that you could talk to/throw practice ninja stars at. Speaking of talking, there’s an included mic built right into the top of the Quickcam, which gets fairly good reception, much like the mic built into PowerBooks and iBooks. "
Story

( Permalink: Logitech Quickcam Pro 4000      Submitted by Noel Wed Mar 31, 2004 )

Business Week on Linux
Two stories on BusinessWeek.com today about Linux. The first talks about how Chinese companies are embracing Linux as an alternative to Microsoft. The second is Mark Anderson talking about how Linux has grown and why they are doing so well.

( Permalink: Business Week on Linux      Submitted by lisa Wed Mar 31, 2004 )

Apple's new 20-inch iMac
"I can live with this iMac's shortcomings, though, because of the dazzling display. The 20-incher provides 124 percent more viewable screen area than a 15-inch LCD display with a resolution of 1,024 by 768 pixels, and 36 percent more viewable screen area than the 17-inch flat panel LCD display with a resolution of 1,440 by 900 pixels."
Story

( Permalink: Apple's new 20-inch iMac      Submitted by Noel Tue Mar 30, 2004 )

Unix on Panther: Accessing the Internet
"f you enable Remote Login under System Preferences -> Sharing, you can access your Mac's Unix shell from any networked computer that can run SSH (http://www.ssh.com/), OpenSSH (http://www.openssh.org/), or a compatible application such as PuTTY (a Windows implementation of SSH available at http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/). SSH and OpenSSH can be installed on many Unix systems, and OpenSSH is included with many Linux distributions, including Mac OS X."
Story

( Permalink: Unix on Panther: Accessing the Internet      Submitted by Noel Tue Mar 30, 2004 )

Cutting down your workload with cluster ssh
"Clusterssh (cssh) is designed to basically do the same commands in multiple windows, each can be a different machine. This works very well for clusters where everything should be the same. Also it means you basically need the same config files on both, so you can use the same keystrokes to edit the same file on different machines. "
Story

( Permalink: Cutting down your workload with cluster ssh      Submitted by Noel Tue Mar 30, 2004 )

A primer on NUMA (Non-Uniform Memory Access)
"NUMA is a memory architecture used in multiprocessors wherein apart from the common system memory each processor has its own local memory which can be used for the processor's own computations. Each processor uses the local memory for data and instruction sharing purpose and some of its internal computations are done in the internal local memory which leads to reduced memory contention resulting into higher program efficiency. "
Story

( Permalink: A primer on NUMA (Non-Uniform Memory Access)      Submitted by Noel Tue Mar 30, 2004 )

Why You Should Choose Microsoft Word Over vi
"But when I tried to get my nephew -- our IT guy with MCSE certification -- to learn vi, he nearly pulled all his hair out from frustration just trying to save a simple file. Obviously, our experiment with Linux was a disaster." Indeed, the Microsoft report cites research indicating that vi users have 12% less hair than Word users. "This cannot be coincidental... it's obvious that vi users are more likely to pull out and damage their hair," the report states."
Story

( Permalink: Why You Should Choose Microsoft Word Over vi      Submitted by Noel Tue Mar 30, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

PureMessage Raises E-mail Admin Standard
(Tue Sep 9, 2003)

Certification: Exploring RHCT Certification
(Mon Sep 8, 2003)

Data Visualization Using Perl/Tk
(Mon Sep 8, 2003)

Troubleshooting, and Repairing Wireless Networks
(Mon Sep 8, 2003)

Access USB Devices from Java Applications
(Fri Sep 5, 2003)

Boscov Inches Into Linux
(Fri Sep 5, 2003)

Book Review: Absolute OpenBSD
(Fri Sep 5, 2003)

Opinion - SCO vs. IBM
(Thu Sep 4, 2003)

GUI vs. CLI: A Qualitative Comparison
(Thu Sep 4, 2003)

Installing XFce-4 on SuSE 8.2
(Thu Sep 4, 2003)

Server Clinic: R Handy for Crunching Data
(Wed Sep 3, 2003)

Cisco Security Specialist's Guide to PIX Firewalls
(Wed Sep 3, 2003)

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.95 AS Beta Preview
(Wed Sep 3, 2003)

Secure Programmer: Developing Secure Programs
(Thu Aug 28, 2003)

GNOME Trouble
(Thu Aug 28, 2003)

Wireless on Linux, Part 1
(Wed Aug 27, 2003)

Perens: IT Pros Must Lobby for Open Source
(Wed Aug 27, 2003)

How Secure is Your Wireless Network?
(Wed Aug 27, 2003)

The Simplicity of Sockets
(Mon Aug 25, 2003)

Postfix: A Secure and Easy-to-Use MTA
(Mon Aug 25, 2003)

Project Mad Hatter
(Mon Aug 25, 2003)

Analysis of SCO's Las Vegas Slide Show
(Mon Aug 25, 2003)

GNU Security Breach
(Fri Aug 22, 2003)

Installing Tivoli Access Manager on Linux
(Fri Aug 22, 2003)

Taking The Linux+ Exam
(Fri Aug 22, 2003)

Building Linux Virtual Private Networks
(Fri Aug 22, 2003)

Linus on McBride's Latest Claims
(Thu Aug 21, 2003)

Book Review - Practical Unix & Internet Security 3
(Thu Aug 21, 2003)

Linux Kernel 2.6 For Machines Great and Small
(Thu Aug 21, 2003)

Alan Cox Takes One Year Sabbatical
(Thu Aug 21, 2003)

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