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OpenBSD/hppa Snapshot Installation Report
OpenBSD/hppa runs on a large set of the 32-bit Hewlett Packard Precision Architecture workstations and servers (HP PA-RISC).
OpenBSD/hppa

( Permalink: OpenBSD/hppa Snapshot Installation Report      Submitted by stuart Thu Apr 29, 2004 )

Tapping the Matrix, Part 1
"At the time when clusters were emerging, developers began building software that allowed personal computers to share resources by allowing machines to loosely bind to one another to form highly dynamic networks. The new networks became known as Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks, and were initially used for instant messaging (ICQ) and later, file sharing (Napster)."
Story

( Permalink: Tapping the Matrix, Part 1      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 29, 2004 )

Compressing Web Content
"Reducing costs is a key consideration for every IT budget. One of the items looked at most closely is the cost of a company's bandwidth. Using content compression on a Web site is one way to reduce both bandwidth needs and cost. With that in mind, this article examines some of the compression modules available for Apache, specifically, mod_gzip for Apache 1.3.x and 2.0.x and mod_deflate for Apache 2.0.x."
Story

( Permalink: Compressing Web Content      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 29, 2004 )

Exploiting Software: How to Break Code
"Which gets me to a point that I think other people will end up bringing up if they read the book. If you canít understand the assembler in the book, you wonít get how to actually exploit code. In other words, if you pick up this book assuming you will walk away with a step-by-step guide with snippits of code to put together your own 'recipe' exploit you have another thing coming. Although there are some really good snippits ranging from payload insertion for overflows to rootkit mapping (and lots of other neat little tidbits in between) the reality is that this book shows you how to look for weaknesses and then attack them. "
Story

( Permalink: Exploiting Software: How to Break Code      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 29, 2004 )

Lphoto & Lsongs... Prepare To Be Linspired
"Linspire's head, Michael Robertson, recently acknowledged the lack of "polished" consumer applications for the Linux desktop. To counter this, they've developed two somewhat painful consumer applications that have a striking resemblance of iTunes and iPhoto: Lsongs and Lphoto. The idea behind Lsongs is rip your favorite songs from CDs, listen to your music and Internet radio, create playlists, transfer music to a portable digital music player and burn audio CDs. In today's terms, that is a list of basic features that you would expect from any self-respecting music player on any platform. With Lphoto you can import, organize, edit and print all of your digital photos."
Story

( Permalink: Lphoto & Lsongs... Prepare To Be Linspired      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 29, 2004 )

Deploy software, autonomically
In an ideal world, all your code is packaged into a universal install script, with dependency checking, updating, and logging services handled automatically. Conflicts between resources required by different applications are resolved according to predefined policies. Site-specific configuration changes are automatically applied as part of the unattended installation, and tests are run across the environment to confirm that everything is good to go. Autonomic computing technology brings this vision closer to an achievable reality.

( Permalink: Deploy software, autonomically      Submitted by Anonymous Thu Apr 29, 2004 )

Talking with John Calhoun
"But when I set upon writing a game, it was Glider. I didn't really have a plan, so to speak. I guess my first thought was to recreate that little paper airplane and vent combo from the Commodore 64. If it worked, I would have learned to handle keystrokes and animate graphics on screen. I would understand too the performance constraints of the Macintosh. (Like, can you scroll the entire screen in real time?)"
Story

( Permalink: Talking with John Calhoun      Submitted by Noel Wed Apr 28, 2004 )

Building a 64-bit Dual-Opteron Linux Workstation
"As I write this, I've just finished building a custom dual Opteron workstation. This is not a gaming computer, or an office system ó it is a software development workstation, with support for various programming, scientific, and mathematical packages. This article explains the choices I made and describes the process of getting the system up and running."
Story

( Permalink: Building a 64-bit Dual-Opteron Linux Workstation      Submitted by Noel Wed Apr 28, 2004 )

Abusing the Linux MODULE_LICENSE Macro
Though the Linux kernel itself is licensed under the GPL, Linux creator Linus Torvalds has explicity stated that it is okay for companies to ship binary-only modules without releasing source code. Free (as in freedom) modules are able to declare through a macro that they are free and that source code is available, while those that don't are assumed to not be free. This allows among other things the ability for kernel developers to ignore bug reports from users that have loaded proprietary modules and thus for which no source code to debug is available.

KernelTrap has an interesting article about a consulting company that is abusing this macro, releasing binary-only modules that intentionally fool the kernel into thinking that they are GPL'd and leading Linux creator Linus Torvalds to comment, "Hey, that is interesting in itself, since playing the above kinds of games makes it pretty clear to everybody that any infringement was done wilfully. They should be talking to their lawyers about things like that."

( Permalink: Abusing the Linux MODULE_LICENSE Macro      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Apr 28, 2004 )

CLI for noobies: not your father's batch
"The at man page tells us more about the at timespec. For example, you can specify at run a job at teatime, or noon, or midnight. You can also specify an exact time, or date, for the job to run. And you can combine them by saying something like "4pm + 3 days". The man page points readers to an entire document (on my system is is at /usr/share/doc/packages/timespec) on the at timespec."
Story

( Permalink: CLI for noobies: not your father's batch      Submitted by Noel Wed Apr 28, 2004 )

Providing FTP Services with PureFTPd
"PureFTPd is an excellent choice for providing FTP services, it is fast, secure, feature rich, and actively developed, it is based upon the original Troll-FTPd package, and is made available under the BSD License. There are many other packages available for providing FTP services such as ProFTPD and WU-FTPD, and while I am sure they have their strengths and weaknesses, after trying them I always come back to PureFTPd. So now you know a little more about PureFTPd lets get it installed and see what it can do."
Story

( Permalink: Providing FTP Services with PureFTPd      Submitted by Noel Wed Apr 28, 2004 )

Garbage Collection In OOP Code
Garbage collection (GC) is a technology that frees programmers from the hassle of explicitly managing memory allocation for every object they create. Traditionally, the benefit of this automation has come at the cost of significant overhead. However, more efficient algorithms and techniques, coupled with the increased computational power of computers have made the overhead negligible for all but the most extreme situations. Read the article at OSNews.

( Permalink: Garbage Collection In OOP Code      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Apr 28, 2004 )

Setting Up Multiple Local Domains In OS X For Web
A how-to for web developers and web application developers who use OS X as their development platform. This article shows how you can set up multiple local domains on an OS X box along with Apache's VirtualHost directive to support multiple sites, projects or applications locally. Read the article here

( Permalink: Setting Up Multiple Local Domains In OS X For Web      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Apr 28, 2004 )

Having fun with unattended software installation
In an ideal world, all your code is packaged into a universal install script, with dependency checking, updating, and logging services handled automatically. Conflicts between resources required by different applications are resolved according to predefined policies. Site-specific configuration changes are automatically applied as part of the unattended installation, and tests are run across the environment to confirm that everything is good to go. This article shows you how the general tenets of autonomic computing are applied to software installation.

( Permalink: Having fun with unattended software installation      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Apr 28, 2004 )

iSkin Evo
"As soon as I first got a hold of my new 15 GB iPod, I discovered quickly that it is a delicate creature. It's slick, white coating and screen are subject to scratches and other unsightly markings. I immediately began searching for something that could be used to protect my new treasure. All the things carried in the Apple Store were too big and bulky; I wanted something that fit snugly and still allowed for carry in my pocket. I ended up on the iSkin website and was impressed by their new product."
Story

( Permalink: iSkin Evo      Submitted by Noel Tue Apr 27, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

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The Linux Enterprise Cluster

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Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

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Older News

The State of Linux 2003
(Mon Dec 1, 2003)

Linux Kernel 2.6 Heads for Final Testing
(Sun Nov 30, 2003)

A High-Performance, Massively Scalable P2P Network
(Sat Nov 29, 2003)

Linux Desktop Distro Shootout
(Sat Nov 29, 2003)

Building Secure Wireless Networks with 802.11
(Fri Nov 28, 2003)

Code Reading: An Open Source Perspective
(Fri Nov 28, 2003)

FAQ: 12 Questions about OpenOffice
(Fri Nov 28, 2003)

Oracle Developers and Linux
(Wed Nov 26, 2003)

Secrets of Computer Espionage
(Wed Nov 26, 2003)

The Distcc c Compiler
(Wed Nov 26, 2003)

Using LDAP to Secure J2EE Applications
(Wed Nov 26, 2003)

Linux as a Small Business Internet Gateway
(Tue Nov 25, 2003)

Panther Maintenance Tips
(Tue Nov 25, 2003)

OSNews: Interview with freedesktop.org Members
(Tue Nov 25, 2003)

What Does 2004 Hold in Store for Linux?
(Mon Nov 24, 2003)

Evolving With the Object-Oriented Wireless Model
(Mon Nov 24, 2003)

Outsourcing IT Workers?
(Mon Nov 24, 2003)

Linux Super Computer Named After Gen. Powell
(Mon Nov 24, 2003)

Equipping SWT Applications with Content Assistants
(Sun Nov 23, 2003)

Editorial: The State of OSS Documentation
(Sun Nov 23, 2003)

Spam and Virus Free Email
(Sat Nov 22, 2003)

Remote Scripting Servlet in Action
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MySQL: Enterprise Projects and MaxDB
(Fri Nov 21, 2003)

theKompany.com's Data Architect Review
(Fri Nov 21, 2003)

Making and Melting Tarballs
(Fri Nov 21, 2003)

Open Source Development with CVS
(Thu Nov 20, 2003)

EditPad Pro
(Thu Nov 20, 2003)

Sun and AOL form StarOffice Pact
(Thu Nov 20, 2003)

SuSE Linux 9.0 Professional Review
(Wed Nov 19, 2003)

Have a Linux Adventure
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