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Mad Macs and the Unshredder
"I got all those code names from Owen W. Linsmayer, the unshredder of Apple Computer history. He's been covering Apple since the early 1980s, and he probably knows more about the company than Steve Jobs does. At least Owen's memory is more reliable. When Mac columnist and aquarium inventor Andy Ihnatko called me recently with an obscure Apple history question, my immediate response was, "Did you ask Owen?" (Andy's predictable reply was, "Duh! Just before I called you, dude.") Moral of the story: people who know know Owen knows best."
Story

( Permalink: Mad Macs and the Unshredder      Submitted by Noel Wed May 12, 2004 )

Battery Tech High Capacity Laptop Batteries
"That is, if you have a standard battery! Battery Tech makes high capacity batteries that claim to knock the socks off of any standard laptop battery. And their products are current, this company is on the ball for getting batteries out for the newest Apple laptops. They've got batteries for the 12" and 14" iBooks and the 12". 15", and 17" PowerBook. In addition, they have cheap power adapters for most laptops."
Story

( Permalink: Battery Tech High Capacity Laptop Batteries      Submitted by Noel Wed May 12, 2004 )

The IPv6 Internet: Connect Today with Linux
"Migration from IPv4 to IPv6 has been underway for a few years now, encouraged by the availability of IPv6 implementations on most operating systems and router platforms, and the availability of an IPv6 backbone that is being used for testing and deployment. In this article, I will provide a tutorial that will allow you to enable IPv6 support on your Linux machine and connect it to the IPv6 backbone (also called IPv6 Internet or the 6bone)."
Story

( Permalink: The IPv6 Internet: Connect Today with Linux      Submitted by Noel Wed May 12, 2004 )

SuSE Linux 9.1 Personal
"SuSE 9.1 Personal Edition was based on the x86 port of the Professional Edition, and it includes all of the same outstanding tools and utilities that make Professional Edition one of the finest desktop GNU/Linux distributions around. Personal Edition is a third the price and has about a fifth of the software as Professional Edition. Is this the operating system for you? Hopefully this review will help you figure that out."
Story

( Permalink: SuSE Linux 9.1 Personal      Submitted by Noel Wed May 12, 2004 )

DOSEMU and programming with PowerBASIC
"I have used PowerBasic for numerous projects ever since it was Borland TurboBasic 1.0 but haven't actually installed or used it (or needed to) for maybe the past five or six years, ever since I really got into Linux. However, I have a current project/job/commission (whatever the word that's currently in vogue might be) that requires a DOS program, and I decided to see how PowerBasic runs under dosemu before I started dragging out one of my old DOS machines in the basement."
Story

( Permalink: DOSEMU and programming with PowerBASIC      Submitted by Noel Wed May 12, 2004 )

timer — A Low-precision Visual Timer
"For many years, I've wanted a simple command-line timer program to use in conjunction with short human tasks — the sort of thing my wristwatch timer works for, but I'm not always wearing that watch. I want something that provides some indication of elapsed time or time remaining. Amazingly, the commercial Unixes I'm familiar with do not provide such a utility; nor does one seem to be readily available with the standard X Window tools. Even searching on the Web, I have come up empty-handed. I could use "sleep", but calculating minutes to seconds, typing out a convoluted command line, etc., is more work and less functionality than the solution I wanted. So, I wrote my own script."
Story

( Permalink: timer — A Low-precision Visual Timer      Submitted by Noel Wed May 12, 2004 )

Helio Chissini de Castro
"The first time I took on KDE, I got Ark maintainership. After that I started packaging Conectiva Linux independent packages. Today I work on Kmix, solve a bug, or another time I try to see whats happening with Ark (since I plan to pass maintainership to the other new guys :-). On a non developer basis, I got the task to be the primary contact on South America and the personal task to annoy some guys of core kde from time to time... :-) And of course, I work hard on PR to show KDE to the Brazilian masses."
Story

( Permalink: Helio Chissini de Castro      Submitted by Noel Wed May 12, 2004 )

BBEdit: Its Unix Support Doesn't Suck Either
"Most Macintosh developers have not grown up with the notion that their editor is a powerful, multi-use tool. Something, in effect, that serves many uses and is extendable to many problem domains. For example, one of the reasons I've always liked Emacs is its stability, features, and expendability. With Emacs, you can open a shell within a buffer, edit remote files using Ange ftp, and extend the editor's functionally with Elisp. In addition, the language modes are a great selling point for using the editor for all your writing needs."
Story

( Permalink: BBEdit: Its Unix Support Doesn't Suck Either      Submitted by Noel Wed May 12, 2004 )

CLI for noobies: mmmmm pizza
"Let's see if I can tempt you laggardly louts out of your GUI nest. How about some pizza? There. I knew that would do it. If anything on earth has the kryptonite-like strength required to melt those GUI shackles, it's pizza. Domino's pizza in this case, delivered to your door. So welcome back to the command line interface, and enjoy your stay."
Story

( Permalink: CLI for noobies: mmmmm pizza      Submitted by Noel Wed May 12, 2004 )

Instant Messaging: iChat, uChat, weChat
"Each of the clients mentioned above are in various states of development. I would recommend trying each one out that fits most or all of your needs before you make a decision. Personally, I stick with iChat AV and MSN Messenger 4.0 for my chat abilities. Once Proteus is out of beta, however, I may switch to it. I am in love with its interface."
Story

( Permalink: Instant Messaging: iChat, uChat, weChat      Submitted by Noel Tue May 11, 2004 )

Understanding TCP Reset Attacks

A vulnerability in TCP, the transmission control protocol, recently received some exposure in the media. Paul Watson released a white paper titled Slipping In The window: TCP Reset Attacks at the 2004 CanSecWest conference, providing a much better understanding of the real-world risks of TCP reset attacks.

To better understand the reality of this threat, KernelTrap spoke with Theo de Raadt, the creator of OpenBSD, an operating system which among other goals proactively focuses on security. In this article, we aim to provide some background into the workings of TCP, and then to build upon this foundation to understand how resets attacks work.

( Permalink: Understanding TCP Reset Attacks      Submitted by Jeremy Andrews Tue May 11, 2004 )

Storage Tank: Delivering On The SAN Promise
"Providing this simple, natural view of a SAN is what Storage Tank, a new technology from IBM, is all about. With Storage Tank, you turn all the disks in your SAN into a single, giant filesystem. You mount that filesystem on as many servers as you like, and read and write files as if the filesystem were on a locally attached disk."
Story

( Permalink: Storage Tank: Delivering On The SAN Promise      Submitted by Noel Tue May 11, 2004 )

Will the Real NUI please stand up?
It has been some time since I first read an article by Tom Halfhill in Byte Magazine that portended the rise of the Network User Interface (aka NUI). In fact, that article was written in July, 1997. Tom's article was on target for what was being proposed then as the “Network Computer.”

( Permalink: Will the Real NUI please stand up?      Submitted by Chuck Talk Tue May 11, 2004 )

Insights From A Solaris x86 Evangelist
"About one year ago, Alan DuBoff, Solaris x86 Community Evangelist, joined Sun Microsystems as a Solaris x86 evangelist to work in Community Relations. In the following Q&A, Alan shares his thoughts on Sun's commitment to Solaris for x86 systems, Sun's x86 efforts since the 2003 May 19 Low Cost Computing Event and what he is most excited about with regard to the future of Solaris."
Story

( Permalink: Insights From A Solaris x86 Evangelist      Submitted by Noel Tue May 11, 2004 )

Linux Offers Better Windows Apps Without the Wait
"You want to run Windows applications, but you want better stability and reliability? You can run your applications on Windows 98SE or ME under Linux using NeTraverse Inc.'s outstanding Win4Lin. I use this program myself to run Windows applications on Linux and it just flat out works. Better still, if an application runs amok in the Win4Lin Windows virtual machine, I can just virtually reboot and I'm back up and running in a tenth of the time it would have taken me had the same error occurred in native Windows."
Story

( Permalink: Linux Offers Better Windows Apps Without the Wait      Submitted by Noel Tue May 11, 2004 )

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Older News

MySQL Crash Course
(Fri Jan 2, 2004)

Novell Plans GUI For 04
(Thu Jan 1, 2004)

Encap Package Management System
(Thu Jan 1, 2004)

SuSE Linux 9.0
(Thu Jan 1, 2004)

Linux System Startup
(Thu Jan 1, 2004)

Building and Installing nVidia Drivers
(Wed Dec 31, 2003)

Dual G5 Versus Dual Opteron
(Wed Dec 31, 2003)

Building Tiny Systems With Embedded NetBSD
(Wed Dec 31, 2003)

Home Networking
(Wed Dec 31, 2003)

Where is my Made for Linux Machine
(Wed Dec 31, 2003)

Apache Regex Problems
(Tue Dec 30, 2003)

Hack notes, Linux and Unix Security
(Tue Dec 30, 2003)

KDE 3.x on Sun Solaris
(Tue Dec 30, 2003)

Installing Courier-IMAP on OpenBSD
(Tue Dec 30, 2003)

Mepis Linux
(Tue Dec 30, 2003)

Review of Ground Up Java
(Mon Dec 29, 2003)

Emulating Networks Using User-Mode Linux
(Mon Dec 29, 2003)

Network Administration from Linux
(Mon Dec 29, 2003)

CxC: C for Parallel Computing
(Mon Dec 29, 2003)

CPU Buyers Guide
(Mon Dec 29, 2003)

Creating Your Own Man Pages
(Sun Dec 28, 2003)

Looking back at Wireless Security in 2003
(Sun Dec 28, 2003)

VaporSec on Mac OS X
(Sun Dec 28, 2003)

802.11n Wireless Networking
(Sat Dec 27, 2003)

Create a Budget with OpenOffice
(Sat Dec 27, 2003)

Linux Desktop Distro Shootout Part IV: LindowsOS 4
(Sat Dec 27, 2003)

Mini Interview with Ximian's Robert Love
(Sat Dec 27, 2003)

St. Jude Prescribes Linux SuperComputer
(Fri Dec 26, 2003)

Learning with FlashKard
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LindowsOS 4
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