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CLI for noobies: got backup?
"You meet the nicest people at the command line: no posturing, no nonsense, just a "get the job done" mentality that seems to get lost when the focus moves away from real functionality to making pretty windows. Get too far away from computing's core values and you could end up with a bug-ridden, security-free, viral infection magnet of an environment. Oh, wait. That's already been done. This week we'll meet one of those nice people you can meet at the CLI and take a look at a command line tool for the most fundamental -- and the most overlooked -- part of personal computing: making backups."
Story

( Permalink: CLI for noobies: got backup?      Submitted by Noel Thu May 20, 2004 )

Develop with the IBM Grid Toolbox
The new IBM Grid Toolbox V3.0 provides an effective solution for developing grid solutions, particularly on IBM eServer hardware. In this article, you'll see the key differences of Grid Toolbox V3.0 over previous versions, and how the eServer platform can be exploited to provide an effective grid environment.

( Permalink: Develop with the IBM Grid Toolbox      Submitted by Anonymous Thu May 20, 2004 )

Linux Name Services
"One of the most fundamental services on a TCP/IP network is name service. It is the service that translates hostnames into IP addresses.Linux systems use two techniques to convert hostnames to addresses: the host table and the Domain Name System (DNS). The /etc/hosts file is a table that maps names to addresses. It is a simple text file that is searched sequentially to match hostnames to IP addresses. The Domain Name System is a hierarchical, distributed database system with thousands of servers across the Internet, handling name and address queries. DNS is far more important than the host table for the operation of the Internet, but both services play a role."
Story

( Permalink: Linux Name Services      Submitted by Noel Thu May 20, 2004 )

Interview With Andrea Arcangeli
Andrea Arcangeli is well known for having completely rewritten and stabilized the virtual memory subsystem in the 2.4 Linux kernel. Many were surprised when Linus Torvalds merged Andrea's VM into 2.4.10, but the new memory subsystem has long since proved itself. Andrea is a 27 year old Linux kernel hacker living in Italy and working for SUSE.

In an interview on KernelTrap, Andrea reflects back on his first exposure to Linux, his first contributions to the kernel, and the meaning of the GPL. He describes his VM work in great detail, both that which is in the 2.4 mainline kernel, as well as his object-based reverse mapping work that can be found in his 2.6-aa patchset. He also discusses his plans for the 2.7 development kernel, describes a possible alternative to kernel preemption that could reduce average latency, talks about his non-kernel hobbies, and much more.

( Permalink: Interview With Andrea Arcangeli      Submitted by Jeremy Andrews Wed May 19, 2004 )

Apache Repaired
In this weeks Secuity Alerts, we look at a problems with the Apache web server, the Linux kernel, Systrace, ssmtp, exim, SuSE Live CD 9.1, Heimdal k5admind, Kolab, IRIX Networking Security, and NukeJokes.

( Permalink: Apache Repaired      Submitted by Noel Wed May 19, 2004 )

 Book Review: Ethereal Packet Sniffing
"In addition to the content of the book, I liked the layout of it as well. Throughout the book, there are a plethora of screen shots that help illustrate the topics being discussed, and sidebars with the label “Notes from the Underground”. While regular notes are used to define terms and such, the Underground notes serve as digressions that take you down venues you might not have otherwise considered. Each chapter concludes with a summary, “Solutions Fast Track” (bullets of what you need to know if you’re in a hurry), and list of Frequently Asked Questions."
Story

( Permalink:  Book Review: Ethereal Packet Sniffing      Submitted by Noel Wed May 19, 2004 )

Build yourself a Linux-based Internet gateway
"Getting a Linux-based gateway to run from scratch was an interesting learning experience. Some things were quite opaque and difficult to get working, and it takes some tolerance for frustration to get things up and running (and again, I'm talking about without the help of GUI-based tools that are included in most distributions to make the processes much less difficult). Bridging is my major pet peeve in this respect -- some more solid documentation is needed here. Getting an ISA card to work can be annoying as well, thanks to the inherent shortcomings of ISA, since it can involve trying several different IO addresses and IRQs; some diagnostic tools would make this step easier and less frustrating."
Story

( Permalink: Build yourself a Linux-based Internet gateway      Submitted by Noel Wed May 19, 2004 )

Holger Dyroff of SUSE Linux, Novell
"99% of our customers never touch the kernel on their own. Most of our end-users use the kernel out of the box, without recompiling it, and that is the reason why we do not support kernel recompilation.The customer is however free to do what he wants, and we provide for those users who want to build their own kernel, all the development tools to recompile it, but this is not covered by the installation support. "
Story

( Permalink: Holger Dyroff of SUSE Linux, Novell      Submitted by Noel Wed May 19, 2004 )

Interview with Element Computer executives
"We've since moved to offering an Apple-like combination of our own tailored distribution, ION, so that we can ensure a top-shelf customer experience. We know the hardware, and hence we can eliminate many of the problems people experience with Linux right off the bat. Plus the TCO of an Element solution running ION is thousands less than a Windows solution using MS Licensing v.6. That's tangible to small and medium business."
Story

( Permalink: Interview with Element Computer executives      Submitted by Noel Wed May 19, 2004 )

Expanding Your GarageBand Loop Library
"Most people have not thought of external loops as something to use when composing in GarageBand - after all, don't you have enough already? GarageBand by default gives you over 1,000 loops, and Jam Pack installs over 2,000 more. It's unfathomable to imagine that even 10-15% of those loops will see the light of day, simply due to sheer volume. "
Story

( Permalink: Expanding Your GarageBand Loop Library      Submitted by Noel Wed May 19, 2004 )

PearPC 0.1: Is It A Miracle?
Thom Holwerda provides a quick guide and a write-up of his experience with the PowerPC emulator for Windows and Unix, PearPC 0.1. Screenshots included.

( Permalink: PearPC 0.1: Is It A Miracle?      Submitted by Anonymous Wed May 19, 2004 )

OS X Makes Slow Debut on PC 
"Installation (of OS X) works beautifully but takes about four hours on a 1300 Athlon," said Weyergraf, referring to a PC with a 1.3GHz AMD Athlon chip. "I must admit 10.3 (OS X Panther) still has problems.... Some program crashes at startup and makes Panther restart it, over and over. We are working on this."
Story

( Permalink: OS X Makes Slow Debut on PC       Submitted by Noel Tue May 18, 2004 )

Review: NoteRiser
"As far as portability, the NoteRiser’s middle name is portability. Get this: there are included Velcro patches that allow you to attach the NoteRiser directly to a laptop. Then simply flatten out the stand when you want to go anywhere. This is great if you’re moving between two setups, such as from work to home. However, it’s not going to work if you’re looking to setup on a picnic bench or something. You’ll need an external mouse and keyboard, or else be prepared for some achy wrists, since the NoteRiser sets your laptop up at around a 50 degree angle. "
Story

( Permalink: Review: NoteRiser      Submitted by Noel Tue May 18, 2004 )

SightFlex Adjustable iSight Stand
"That's where the new SightFlex adjustable iSight mounting stand from MacMice comes in. SightFlex is essentially a six-and-a-half foot long USB cable with the first 20" running coaxially inside a flexible metal gooseneck similar to old-fashioned gooseneck lamps (I have one by my bed) that can be grabbed and twisted any way you want with the happy characteristic of holding its shape when bent and staying the way you put it."
Story

( Permalink: SightFlex Adjustable iSight Stand      Submitted by Noel Tue May 18, 2004 )

Gunnar Schmi Dt
"That was years later. In summer 2002 I started to write KMouth, an application that allows the user to type in sentences that will then become spoken by the computer. (I wrote that application because my mother had an illness in her last years that caused her to be able to do fewer and fewer things. In 2002 she slowly lost the control of her tongue and as a result of that she lost her voice.) As KDE was my favorite desktop I naturally wrote the application for KDE. (Although that was my first C++ application -- until then I had written software in Pascal and Java)."
Story

( Permalink: Gunnar Schmi Dt      Submitted by Noel Tue May 18, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

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Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

NASA Maestro Software
(Wed Jan 14, 2004)

Linux Kernel Trouble
(Wed Jan 14, 2004)

Henning Brauer
(Wed Jan 14, 2004)

Linux in Academic Labs Revisited
(Wed Jan 14, 2004)

The State of Perl
(Wed Jan 14, 2004)

Panther: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
(Wed Jan 14, 2004)

The Eight Rules of Security
(Tue Jan 13, 2004)

Comments on The Enemy Within
(Tue Jan 13, 2004)

Linux as an iTunes Music Server
(Tue Jan 13, 2004)

NoCat – Wireless Network Security
(Tue Jan 13, 2004)

Getting and Installing NetBSD-current
(Tue Jan 13, 2004)

The Effective Incident Response Team
(Tue Jan 13, 2004)

The Enemy Within: Firewalls and Backdoors
(Mon Jan 12, 2004)

Guide for the Net Install of SuSe 9.0
(Mon Jan 12, 2004)

A Review of Knoppix
(Mon Jan 12, 2004)

Leveraging Your Oracle 9i Skills
(Mon Jan 12, 2004)

LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Winners
(Mon Jan 12, 2004)

Managing Linux Security Effectively in 2004
(Mon Jan 12, 2004)

Checking Things With expect
(Sun Jan 11, 2004)

C Coding Tip: Self-Manage Data Buffer Memory
(Sun Jan 11, 2004)

Linux Sound and Music Software
(Sun Jan 11, 2004)

Designing Network Security
(Sat Jan 10, 2004)

Effective Use of Joins in Select Statements
(Sat Jan 10, 2004)

The Future of Linux is Proprietary
(Sat Jan 10, 2004)

Managing Linux Security Effectively in 2004
(Fri Jan 9, 2004)

A Week with Fedora Core 1
(Fri Jan 9, 2004)

What is Mac OS X?
(Fri Jan 9, 2004)

FreeBSD 5.1
(Fri Jan 9, 2004)

DAMNSmallLinux Review
(Fri Jan 9, 2004)

Desktop Background Slide Show
(Fri Jan 9, 2004)

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