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GUI administration with KSysguard
"KSysguard is actually two applications; a GUI front end, where you can configure sets of worksheets to represent different machines or different monitoring scenarios, and a backend daemon which essentially feeds data to the front end. The back end daemon can be started at boot time or invoked manually from the front end, even if the daemon is on a remote host."
Story

( Permalink: GUI administration with KSysguard      Submitted by Noel Tue May 25, 2004 )

Linux - Enterprise Ready?
"You may remember that just three years ago, Bloor Research published a report concluding that Linux was not yet ready to support large enterprise applications. Bloor Research North America recently completed a follow-up study looking at the Linux of today and its enterprise-readiness. After examining Linux scalability, availability, reliability, security, manageability, flexibility, as well as server consolidation characteristics, Bloor Research believes that Linux is now enterprise ready. Here are the findings that led to this conclusion:"
"Linux Moles "

( Permalink: Linux - Enterprise Ready?      Submitted by Anonymous Tue May 25, 2004 )

Minimizing privileges
On March 3rd, 2003, Internet Security Systems warned of a serious vulnerability in Sendmail. All electronic mail is transferred using a mail transfer agent (MTA), and Sendmail is the most popular MTA, so this warning affected many organizations worldwide. See how to use some newer security mechanisms, such as FreeBSD jail(), Linux Security Module and Security-Enhanced Linux.

( Permalink: Minimizing privileges      Submitted by Anonymous Tue May 25, 2004 )

UNIX Basics: JOB SCHEDULING
"Succinctly stated, cron's role is to spawn jobs in accordance with the passage of time.  cron itself is normally started at boot time when the system switches to multiuser operation and once started, never stops unless it is manually killed or the system is halted.  cron is slaved to the system clock and awakens at one minute intervals to start scheduled jobs (which are referred to as cron jobs)."
Story

( Permalink: UNIX Basics: JOB SCHEDULING      Submitted by Noel Tue May 25, 2004 )

Fedora Core 2 Also runs on PPC
"Now, the Fedora Core installation actually starts - I choose a Workstation installation. 10. When it comes to disk partitioning, make sure you use Disk Druid - the autopartitioning doesn't add the Apple Bootstrap partition (but it works otherwise). I created about 18GB for /, using an ext3 filesystem, and a 512MB partition for swap. The Apple Bootstrap partition is of size 1MB only - make sure its the first partition, even before your OS X partition(s)."
Story

( Permalink: Fedora Core 2 Also runs on PPC      Submitted by Noel Tue May 25, 2004 )

Reducing Boot Times for In-Car Computers, Part II
"There are several good reasons to reduce boot times besides getting the system up quickly when the car starts. PVRs (personal video recorders) such as TiVo are available everywhere, but there are no good, well-integrated PMRs (personal media recorders) for in the car. Two key ingredients are needed to make this type of device work well with an in-car computer: the ability to download dynamically a list of program times; and the ability for the in-car computer to wake up on a schedule, do some work and go back to sleep."
Story

( Permalink: Reducing Boot Times for In-Car Computers, Part II      Submitted by Noel Tue May 25, 2004 )

Apple video tools pack Production Show
"Interest among industry professionals and media present at the show focuses on high-definition TV, as European broadcast networks assemble the infrastructure and talent pool they need to deliver this kind of digital programming. Apple is emerging as clear leader in this space, armed with products such as Final Cut Pro HD, Motion and Shake. The company is offering seminars in the use of these applications throughout the show and attendance for these is very high."
Story

( Permalink: Apple video tools pack Production Show      Submitted by Noel Mon May 24, 2004 )

Apple Power Mac G5 video benchmark
"The performance of the G5 represents a profound improvement over its predecessors. As I use various applications on the G5, it has a snappy feel to it that's lacking in the G4. It feels much faster, and its benchmarks show that's not just a perception but a reality (see benchmark table below). In our After Effects benchmarks, the G5 was nearly twice as fast as the fastest currently available Mac G4, soundly whipping it in every test. However, there was only one benchmark, Brian Maffitt's TotalBenchmark comp 1, where the Power Mac G5 beat the fastest PCs we've tested here, which was a disappointment given all the claims that Apple has submitted over the past year about the G5's superiority over any PC. Maybe it is superior using Apple's benchmarks, but in the real world, using actual projects in After Effects and the Maxon Cinema 4D-based Cinebench benchmarks, PCs with Opteron and Xeon chips still rule the speed derby. Even so, the G5 can hold its own against any PC now, unlike its G4 ancestors which lagged far behind PC performance."
Story

( Permalink: Apple Power Mac G5 video benchmark      Submitted by Noel Mon May 24, 2004 )

Remote backup using ssh, tar and cron
"Are you looking for a solution to backup your data to a remote location? While a solid backup solution such as Arkeia or TSM from IBM are nice from an enterprise point of view, simpler solutions are available from a home user's perspective. I will walk you through on you how you can backup your data to a remote server, using the default tools available on all linux systems. In a nutshell, we will use ssh capabilities to allow a cron job to transfer a tarball from you local machine to a remote machine. "
Story

( Permalink: Remote backup using ssh, tar and cron      Submitted by Noel Mon May 24, 2004 )

The Fight Against Spam, Part 3
"Many email applications base their spam filtering primarily on "rules." Luckily for Mac users, Mail uses more advanced technologies. However, let's not forget that rules do exist in Mail and that they can be extremely useful--especially since they can take advantage of AppleScript. To add a rule, use the Rules preferences tab. Unless you've already added a few, you should see only one, from Apple, that adds a light blue color to mail it sends. Feel free to remove it if you want; it won't hurt your computer or prevent Apple from sending you messages."
Story

( Permalink: The Fight Against Spam, Part 3      Submitted by Noel Mon May 24, 2004 )

The Complete Reference
"The book contains one of the best descriptions of the Linux filesystem I have ever read. When I first installed Linux, I received advice from many people on how to partition my Linux system properly. It was a confusing process for me as a novice. The authors here do an exceptional job of explaining each directory's purpose and recommending a simple but effective partitioning scheme for a desktop install."
Story

( Permalink: The Complete Reference      Submitted by Noel Mon May 24, 2004 )

Starting up network services from xintetd
"An automated tool called chkconfig manages what services are started from xinetd and the rc scripts. Network services that are not started out of xinetd are started out of the rc scripts at boot time. Network services started at the default boot level 3 (multiuser networked mode) are started out of the /etc/rc3.d directory. If you look in that directory, you should see a file with the name of the service you want to stop or start. The script to start the service starts with an S, and the kill script starts with a K."
Story

( Permalink: Starting up network services from xintetd      Submitted by Noel Mon May 24, 2004 )

Are mega CPU deep freeze modules really needed?
"My Dad taught heat transfer in college in Nigeria, and I made the mistake asking him for help with the notoriously failure-prone thermodynamics and fluid mechanics courses I had to take in my Electrical Engineering curriculum. Boy did he work me like a drill seargent. I've never been one to think that half of what one learns in college will never be applied in real life, and I've used my heat transfer training before. Now the training was telling me that someone was trying to get me to spring extra bucks for an over-engineered solution."
Story

( Permalink: Are mega CPU deep freeze modules really needed?      Submitted by Noel Mon May 24, 2004 )

The Spatial Way
"Much has been said, and been discussed about "spatial views". Ever since the GNOME hackers decided that Nautilus, the file manager in GNOME, would sport a spatial way of working by default, the word "spatial" has been in just about every other mailing list or review of the desktop environment. Note that I don't claim to be a usability expert, but I'd like to point out the vast resources on spatial usage, as well as show how GNOME 2.6 actually makes you more productive. My base system is Fedora Core 2, with GNOME 2.6.0 (so screenshots come by default, with the BlueCurve theme)."
Story

( Permalink: The Spatial Way      Submitted by Noel Mon May 24, 2004 )

Blizzard offers OS X-native Diablo II installer
"This isn't the first time that Mac OS X has been supported by Diablo II, of course -- Blizzard began offering updates to Diablo II and its official expansion pack, Lord of Destruction, back in March, 2002 that would converted existing Diablo II installations to Mac OS X-native versions. But that would have required users to either use "Classic" or have an existing Mac OS 9 system to install the software to begin with. With this installer, developed using Mac OS X's Cocoa application framework, users can take their original Diablo II or Lord of Destruction discs and install the game natively using Mac OS X alone."
Story

( Permalink: Blizzard offers OS X-native Diablo II installer      Submitted by Noel Sun May 23, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

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Older News

Are 64-bit Binaries Slower than 32-Bit?
(Fri Jan 23, 2004)

Learning Python, 2nd Edition
(Fri Jan 23, 2004)

Xandros OS 2.0 Reviews
(Thu Jan 22, 2004)

Encrypted Email
(Thu Jan 22, 2004)

Problems and Challenges with Honeypots
(Thu Jan 22, 2004)

LAMP Development at Public Sector Web Sites
(Thu Jan 22, 2004)

Writing Portable and Efficient C Programs
(Thu Jan 22, 2004)

My Sun Ultra 5 And Me: A Geek Odyssey
(Thu Jan 22, 2004)

The Biometrics Myth
(Wed Jan 21, 2004)

Enhanced 802.11g NeedToKnow
(Wed Jan 21, 2004)

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
(Wed Jan 21, 2004)

The Future of IP Is Now
(Wed Jan 21, 2004)

SpamAssassin for Evolution on FreeBSD
(Wed Jan 21, 2004)

A Survey of XML Standards: Part 1
(Wed Jan 21, 2004)

Can Linux Save IT Jobs in America?
(Tue Jan 20, 2004)

Linux delivers for U.S. Postal Service
(Tue Jan 20, 2004)

Mars Linux Software Developer
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BZFlag
(Tue Jan 20, 2004)

HOWTO Install NetBSD 1.6.1 on an iBook
(Tue Jan 20, 2004)

Developing a Web Service on Linux
(Tue Jan 20, 2004)

Mepis Linux
(Mon Jan 19, 2004)

Rewrites Considered Harmful?
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Upgrading Apple eMac
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Georgi Guninski
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Rayman 3: Hoodlum Havoc
(Mon Jan 19, 2004)

The Wrath of Linux
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BSD vs Linux
(Sun Jan 18, 2004)

Linus Torvalds on Desktop Linux
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LinuxWorld in New York City 20-23 January 2004
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Shuttling Along: The SB62G2 and Linux
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