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Network Your Shell Scripts with Netpipes
"netpipes is a suite of utilities for shell-script writers that builds on the idea of conventional pipes to allow different processes to communicate and share data using both TCP and Unix domain-based sockets across the network! Not only does it duplicate the pipe's behavior, but it uses a novel technique called Session Control Protocol (SCP) that provides a simple mechanism for creating multiple, lightweight connections over a single TCP session connection. You can have many datastreams at the same time instead of just one."
Story

( Permalink: Network Your Shell Scripts with Netpipes      Submitted by Noel Sat May 29, 2004 )

Managing Security for Mobile Users, Part 2
"If users think of anything when they see the acronym "SSL", it's usually the tiny lock symbol in their browsers, combined with the extra "s" in the "http" URL protocol identifier. Secure Sockets Layer or Transport Layer Security (TLS) [ref 3] provides for encryption of a session, authentication of a server, and optionally client and message authentication. This means that you can encrypt the data transmission and validate that the server and/or client is who each claims to be. SSL/TLS is not limited to browser-based applications, so virtually any application can be secured with SSL, either explicitly or via the use of helper applications such as stunnel [ref 4] or with the use of SSL/TLS helper network appliances."
Story

( Permalink: Managing Security for Mobile Users, Part 2      Submitted by Noel Sat May 29, 2004 )

What better way than to FindBugs
Static analysis tools promise to find existing bugs in your code without requiring much effort on the part of the developer. Of course, if you've been programming for long, you know those promises don't always pan out. Even so, good static analysis tools are a valuable addition to your toolbox. In this first of a two-part series, Senior Software Engineer Chris Grindstaff looks at how FindBugs can help improve the quality of your code and eliminate bugs lying in wait.

( Permalink: What better way than to FindBugs      Submitted by Anonymous Sat May 29, 2004 )

Eleven small utilities
"I havenít used Cocktail much but from what I hear, itís one of the top system utilities available for Mac OS X. For instance, you can repair permissions, clean out caches, force empty the trash (Panther has something similar in ďSecure Empty TrashĒ under the Finder menu), lock or unlock files and folders, renew DHCP lease, optimize your system, and schedule maintenance tasks. Itís quite geeky, but for a low price, it letís you do some advanced things usually reserved for Terminal."
Story

( Permalink: Eleven small utilities      Submitted by Noel Sat May 29, 2004 )

The visible SAN from Apple
"I came out of that meeting with two key bits of knowledge. First, Xsan is really a SAN file system, which makes SANs useful and accessible beyond their core capabilities. And second, Xsan is precisely the right way to turn inexpensive disk arrays (like Xserve RAID) into shared, consolidated network storage. Hereís the elevator pitch: Xsan does the SAN thing, consolidating and virtualizing storage. But Xsan presents that storage in its most readily usable form, as disks that are partitioned into OS X HFS+ (HFS second-generation) volumes. Each of Xsanís virtual volumes permits simultaneous read/write use by multiple servers."
Story

( Permalink: The visible SAN from Apple      Submitted by Noel Sat May 29, 2004 )

Mac OS X 10.3.4 released
"The Mac OS X 10.3.4 update includes many improvements to applications and networking technology, including improved file sharing and directory services for Mac (AFP), UNIX (NFS), PPTP and wireless networks; improved OpenGL technology and updated ATI and NVIDIA graphic drivers; improved disc burning and recording functionality; additional FireWire audio and USB device compatibility; updated Address Book, Mail, Safari, Stickies and QuickTime applications; and improved compatibility for third party applications. In addition, iPods connected via USB 2.0 are now recognized by iTunes and iSync."
Story

( Permalink: Mac OS X 10.3.4 released      Submitted by Noel Fri May 28, 2004 )

PowerBook G4s
"The biggest changes are in the smallest and newest member of the PowerBook G4 family, the model with a 12-inch display. As before, it's available in two standard configurations: a $1,599 version with a Combo (CD-RW/DVD-ROM) optical drive and a $1,799 version with a SuperDrive (DVD-R/CD-RW). While we tested only the latter, both versions now have noticeably faster G4 processors (1.33GHz, up from 1GHz) and 50 percent more hard-drive capacity (60GB versus 40GB). While the amount of built-in memory hasn't changed (it's still 256MB standard), the bus it sits on is now faster (167MHz versus 133MHz). Video RAM has grown from 32MB to 64MB. And the SuperDrive can now burn DVDs at 4x, twice as fast as before."
Story

( Permalink: PowerBook G4s      Submitted by Noel Fri May 28, 2004 )

The Hidden Treasures of IPTables
"iptables has a lot more to offer than these simple packet-filtering criteria. Some of the extras are fairly well known and even may make their way into some off-the-shelf Linux distributions, but some lesser-known features are worthy of investigation. These are the hidden treasures I intend to point you toward in this article. It would take a book to describe all the possible features and options associated with them, so all I do here is flag their existence and put you on the path of exploration."
Story

( Permalink: The Hidden Treasures of IPTables      Submitted by Noel Fri May 28, 2004 )

SAX processing in Python
"SAX is not a formal standard in the usual sense of the term. It is not ratified by the W3C or any other organisational body. SAX emerged in late 1998 as a de-facto standard API, and SAX version 2 (known as SAX2) has been a rock-solid standard since its appearance in 2001. The original SAX (which was never called SAX1 but could have been) is now obsolete. This article refers to SAX2."
Story

( Permalink: SAX processing in Python      Submitted by Noel Fri May 28, 2004 )

Scripting GNU in the 21st Century
"Most people tend to encounter shell scripts as attempts to write portable utilities that run properly on most, if not all, UNIX workalikes. Instead of making the best use of the shell and related programs, these scripts restrict themselves to the absolute most portable baseline of features. The extreme example of this sort of programming can be seen when one looks at the configure scripts generated by the autoconf program. But this is 2004, and the full GNU environment is now commonplace. The advanced shells and utilities now are the default user environment for GNU/Linux systems, and they are available as install options on BSD-based systems. Even proprietary UNIXes often have complete sets of GNU software laid atop them to bring them up to date with the modern world. Because GNU software can be obtained at little or no cost, there is no excuse to continue scripting in a retrograde proprietary environment. "
Story

( Permalink: Scripting GNU in the 21st Century      Submitted by Noel Fri May 28, 2004 )

Chrooting Apache
"Installing Apache in a chroot jail does not make Apache itself any more secure. Rather, it serves to restrict the access of Apache and its child processes to a small subset of the filesystem. The advantage in chrooting a process is not in preventing a breakin, but rather in containing a potential threat. Before deciding whether you need to chroot your Web server you should consider the advantages and disadvantages of such a setup."
Story

( Permalink: Chrooting Apache      Submitted by Noel Fri May 28, 2004 )

Managing Security for Mobile Users
"The best way to safeguard the mobile user is to use the same approach as you would when securing your network: use layers. You have to worry about the physical system security, network security and data security - it just so happens that it's all in one, compact, portable package: convenient for the attackers, not so convenient for those who need to manage those systems."
Story

( Permalink: Managing Security for Mobile Users      Submitted by Noel Fri May 28, 2004 )

Catching Some ZZZs
"Linux systems have several shells available -- some more powerful than others. Perhaps the most powerful shell is zsh, the Z shell. To give you an idea of the shell's size and complexity, the zshall man page in plain-text format weighs in at more than 16,000 lines. (Rest easy. We won't try to cover all of zsh in this month's column.)"
Story

( Permalink: Catching Some ZZZs      Submitted by Noel Fri May 28, 2004 )

LDAP in Mac OS X Server
"OpenLDAP is running by default in Mac OS X Server, so we only have to make sure that it came up OK and change the settings for our purposes. Open the Server Admin application and connect to your server. In the list of services in the left-hand pane click on Open Directory and it will open to the Overview pane on the right. This should list all the parts of Open Directory as Running; for our purposes we need the LDAP server and the Kerberos KDC running."
Story

( Permalink: LDAP in Mac OS X Server      Submitted by Noel Thu May 27, 2004 )

Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X, 2nd Edition
"If you are experienced in C++ or Java programming, Cocoa development will seem familiar enough. Objective-C is used throughout the book (the author notes that development in Java is possible, but not recommended) for the various and numerous exercises. Cocoa development is made easier with Apple's Xcode application, however, Cocoa is not for the timid or novice programmer. This book is well-written and easy to follow IF you have a respectable level of C/C++ or Java development under your belt."
Story

( Permalink: Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X, 2nd Edition      Submitted by Noel Thu May 27, 2004 )

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Better sendmail Configuration
(Wed Jan 28, 2004)

Performing Date Arithmetic with shift_date
(Wed Jan 28, 2004)

Secure Web Based Mail Services
(Wed Jan 28, 2004)

Best of The Perl Journal
(Wed Jan 28, 2004)

Savage: The Battle For Newerth
(Tue Jan 27, 2004)

Libranet to Ark Linux
(Tue Jan 27, 2004)

A Week with SuSE 9
(Tue Jan 27, 2004)

The Independent Qt Tutorial
(Tue Jan 27, 2004)

Computer Archeology
(Tue Jan 27, 2004)

SCO Most Hated Company?
(Tue Jan 27, 2004)

IBM pSeries 615
(Mon Jan 26, 2004)

The Fedora Configuration Tool Project
(Mon Jan 26, 2004)

Reverse Proxy with Apache
(Mon Jan 26, 2004)

Debian Linux on a Pentium-M mini-ITX SBC
(Mon Jan 26, 2004)

Linux: C++ In The Kernel?
(Mon Jan 26, 2004)

Quick and Easy IPv6 for Debian
(Sun Jan 25, 2004)

Mandrake Linux Shows Profit
(Sun Jan 25, 2004)

Beginning Red Hat Linux 9
(Sun Jan 25, 2004)

Novell Gives Linux a Big Hug
(Sun Jan 25, 2004)

Wireless Network Security Basics
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Lam-mpi Cluster on FreeBSD Howto
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Robert Love
(Sat Jan 24, 2004)

Peering Into the WiMAX Spec
(Sat Jan 24, 2004)

XFM: The Xandros File Manager
(Sat Jan 24, 2004)

Review of Windows Services for Unix 3.5
(Sat Jan 24, 2004)

Advanced UI design for GNOME
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GNU-Linux Home Desktop Kit PC Project Part 4
(Fri Jan 23, 2004)

LinuxWorld NYC 2004 Show Coverage
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The Role of root
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Linux on Mac: a POWER Programmer Primer
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