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ipfilter on GNU/Linux: Is It Finally Here?
"Although GNU/Linux has had its own built-in packet filtering technologies (iptables and ipchains) for some time, the ability to use ipfilter on GNU/Linux may interest those who administer a large number of heterogeneous systems and want to standardize on one packet filtering technology. Using ipfilter everywhere certainly would be easier than using iptables on GNU/Linux systems, ipfw on FreeBSD, pf on OpenBSD and ipfilter on Solaris. With years of ipfilter experience in both my personal and professional life, I was eager to get my hands on the latest ipfilter code and see exactly what it could do on GNU/Linux. Unfortunately, that was easier said than done."
Story

( Permalink: ipfilter on GNU/Linux: Is It Finally Here?      Submitted by Noel Mon May 31, 2004 )

Inside Contextual Menu Items
"Now, it's true that the Mac OS has had the ability to pull up a contextual menu or two for a while now. (I believe it was Mac OS 8 that introduced this ability.) But with Apple selling us nothing but one-button mice and forcing us to hold down the Control key when clicking (called "control-clicking") to invoke a contextual menu, or to install special drivers to use a two-button mouse, it's always seemed more of a "Me too!" implementation than a real attempt to catch up with this very cool Windows feature. Fortunately, with the release of Mac OS X, that changed in a big way!"
Story

( Permalink: Inside Contextual Menu Items      Submitted by Noel Mon May 31, 2004 )

BYOB: Build Your Own Browser, Part 2
"This week's installment will cover multi-window capabilities. Both installments differ from the previous article in one significant way. While they do run through tutorials for all three new features similarly to the first article, each leaves hints and tips on how to add additional features, instead of explicitly defining them. This is both to keep the series to a readable length and also to allow readers the ability to develop their own unique features. I've also included some information on WebKit security issues and other sites, which might be of interest for browser developers. I'm going to start with that because it's topical at the moment, then get back to adding features to our fledgling browser."
Story

( Permalink: BYOB: Build Your Own Browser, Part 2      Submitted by Noel Mon May 31, 2004 )

A look at Apple's new G5 Xserve and Xserve RAID
"For the past two weeks I have been the proud user of Apple's newest assault on the enterprise: a dual-processor Xserve G5 and an Xserve RAID. For those of you who already have a G4 version of the Xserve, you will still be in awe of this box. For those who have never had one, keep a chair handy to faint into. First, let me talk about some of the basic specifications of this new server, which is only now beginning to trickle into the hands of buyers"
Story

( Permalink: A look at Apple's new G5 Xserve and Xserve RAID      Submitted by Noel Mon May 31, 2004 )

BYOB: Build Your Own Browser
"There are a lot of things to like about Apple's Safari web browser -- the stylish user interface (especially the tabs!), SnapBack feature , popup blocker, Google toolbar, and of course, Safari's speed. For developers though, one of the coolest features is hidden under the hood: WebKit -- the Cocoa/Carbon framework that's the basis for Safari. Why is WebKit worth paying attention to? Well, it's a fully documented, fully functional set of web browsing components that developers can integrate into their Cocoa/Carbon applications. WebKit gives developers the ability to make their applications much more powerful with very little added effort."
Story

( Permalink: BYOB: Build Your Own Browser      Submitted by Noel Sun May 30, 2004 )

Ground Force
"The BBC’s flagship gardening programme, Ground Force, now in its seventh year, has been busy broadening its horizons. In the past year or so, the show has become a big hit in the US, and recent episodes took place as far afield as the Falkland Islands and Addis Ababa in Ethiopia. ... The software runs on a dual-processor Power Mac G4 system attached to a 22-inch Apple Cinema Display. Additional kit includes an iBook and a LaCie d2 FireWire hard drive. The show is shot on DigiBeta with separate DAT sound; both sets of tapes have matching time-of-day timecode. The London-based post-production house where the Ground Force online edit takes place slaves a DAT machine to a DigiBeta player to generate a DV version of all the relevant footage and audio, complete with burnt-in timecode. "
Story

( Permalink: Ground Force      Submitted by Noel Sun May 30, 2004 )

Interview with Steven Edwards
"It was mainly out of interest in ReactOS that I started really becoming active in the Wine community. I decided it was time that someone needed to build a better Windows than Windows and found the ReactOS project. The idea of the ReactOS project really hit home once I started thinking about how GNU/Linux has grown. The world needed a free Unix clone and the world needs a free Windows clone. I think of them as almost like two brothers with lots of little cousins in the free software movement. ReactOS is of course still the much smaller brother but I think that will change soon."
Story

( Permalink: Interview with Steven Edwards      Submitted by Noel Sun May 30, 2004 )

Top Ten Ethereal Tips and Tricks
"One of the coolest features of Ethereal is its ability to reassemble all of the packets in a TCP conversation and display the ASCII in a very easy-to-read format. This makes it easy to pick out usernames and passwords from insecure protocols such as Telnet and FTP. The data can also be viewed in EBCDIC, hex dump, and C arrays. This data can then be saved or printed. A good use for this can be to reconstruct a web page. Just follow the stream of the HTTP session and save the output to a file. You should then be able to view the reconstructed HTML content offline, without the graphics of course, in a web browser. "
Story

( Permalink: Top Ten Ethereal Tips and Tricks      Submitted by Noel Sun May 30, 2004 )

Compiling the linux kernel 2.2.12 on VME-PowerPC
"This documentation tries explains how to compile the linux kernel 2.2.12 with VMEbus and Motorola PowerPC MVME24xx boards for diskless operation from a network, which mounts its root filesystems via NFS and including the tulip 100 Mbps driver path because the original linux kernel has a bug for the ethernet DECchip 21142/43 in order to run at 100 Mbps ethernet speed."
Story

( Permalink: Compiling the linux kernel 2.2.12 on VME-PowerPC      Submitted by Noel Sun May 30, 2004 )

Subversion: The new-generation CVS
"If you have ever collaborated on an open source project you are probably no stranger to Concurrent Versions System (CVS), the most popular open source version control system. A great majority of code bases are under CVS control. Even if you have developed mostly proprietary software, chances are good you have worked with CVS, since it offers a great alternative to more expensive proprietary versioning systems like Bitkeeper or Perforce. Subversion builds on CVS concepts."
Story

( Permalink: Subversion: The new-generation CVS      Submitted by Noel Sun May 30, 2004 )

Documenting Projects with Apache Forest
"This article will give you a very basic introduction to Forrest -- just enough to get you started and give you a taste of what's possible -- to see if Forrest's for you; you can find out much more from Forrest's own documentation. We'll close out by taking a look at a small extension to Forrest to give you a sense of what it takes to customize this documentation platform using Java."
Story

( Permalink: Documenting Projects with Apache Forest      Submitted by Noel Sun May 30, 2004 )

The Python Enterprise Application Kit
PEAK is a Python framework for rapidly developing and reusing application components. While Python itself is already a very high-level language, PEAK provides even higher abstractions, largely through the clever use of metaclasses and other advanced Python techniques. In many ways, PEAK does for Python what J2EE does for the Java™ language.

( Permalink: The Python Enterprise Application Kit      Submitted by Anonymous Sun May 30, 2004 )

Building a Linux Media PC
"If you did things the normal way, you'd have a TV and DVD player, a computer and monitor, a CD player, amplifier, and speakers. If you're extremely finicky about sound quality, for example, and already have expensive audio gear, and if you cringe when you hear poor quality audio, you'd better stick with at least part of that. For people who can live with somewhat lesser quality, the media PC can be quite OK. There are options to make it sound better than a standard PC from the local warehouse store, but they cost more. We'll explore those shortly."
Story

( Permalink: Building a Linux Media PC      Submitted by Noel Sat May 29, 2004 )

Violet Dal, the first emotional lamp
"According to Violet Co-founder Olivier Mével, the Dal lamp epitomizes "calm technology" that, unlike a telephone or television, presents information without making intrusive or extensive time demands. Messages and information are diffused subtly into the general ambiance, communicated through "color changes and their rate/rhythm of posting." "
Story

( Permalink: Violet Dal, the first emotional lamp      Submitted by Noel Sat May 29, 2004 )

Programming Class-less Classes
"Recently, I found myself hacking a web application for a customer. If you've written a web application or two, you know the type: a multi-page web form where the fields need to be validated, stored into session data, and then finally dispatched into the next phase. Since I'm always carping, "Use the CPAN, please," I thought I'd find something reusable there for my application. However, after I looked at a number of CPAN modules, I didn't find what I wanted. CGI::Application looked close, but had more knobs and dials than I needed, and yet not enough custom hooks either."
Story

( Permalink: Programming Class-less Classes      Submitted by Noel Sat May 29, 2004 )

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Mandrake Linux 9.2 AMD64 Review
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A Close Look at Sun Microsystems
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GNU GCC Vs Sun's Compiler on a SPARC
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Linus Torvalds on SCO
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Linux Bootable CD Distributions
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Better sendmail Configuration
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Performing Date Arithmetic with shift_date
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Secure Web Based Mail Services
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Best of The Perl Journal
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The Independent Qt Tutorial
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SCO Most Hated Company?
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IBM pSeries 615
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The Fedora Configuration Tool Project
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