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Sendmail Security
"Sendmail was written to operate in a dynamic and changing network environment. Standards were minimal and inconsistently applied. Addressing varied from network to network. To be useful, a mail routing program had to be flexible and configurable. A new network might pop up and you had to have a way to route mail to it. There were numerous gateway machines between networks and sometimes you had to maintain a list of them and keep trying different gateways until you found one that was listening on your network. Instead of having to deal with one standard, like the Internet Protocol (IP) that is familiar today, e-mail transmission had to account for multiple standards on diverse networks. "
Story

( Permalink: Sendmail Security      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 4, 2004 )

Visualize the Internet with Envision
"Envision is essentially an Internet-based slideshow program that Alan and his team started writing to display images from the Astronomy Picture of the Day archive on an old iBook. You point Envision at a Web site that offers public access to its images, and the program goes out, finds the image URLs, and downloads the pictures that meet your criteria for size, name, and so on. (Envision comes with a selection of pre-defined slideshows for museums, currency, comics, and much more.) "
Story

( Permalink: Visualize the Internet with Envision      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 3, 2004 )

23" Apple Cinema HD Display Review
"When I first saw the 23” display, it looked absurdly huge. However, after using it for a while, I can say that it is not too big. If it were more affordable, everyone should have a screen like this. I actually found it to be about the perfect size for a desktop. 20” or 21” would be fine too, but anything larger than the 23” would just be too big to sit in front of."
Story

( Permalink: 23" Apple Cinema HD Display Review      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 3, 2004 )

Has Unix Programming Changed in 20 Years?
"What's the same is that Unix still works in essentially the same way. Processes are created with fork, the program the process runs is chosen by one of the exec calls, you open a file with open, and so on. Many—perhaps most—serious Unix programs access the Internet nowadays, and those system calls (socket, connect, and so on) are also nearly unchanged since they were introduced in BSD Unix in the 1980s. Even the primary implementation language, C, is largely unchanged, although it has grown up: Its standard has been revised a few times, and everybody now codes with function prototypes and without assuming anything about the size of integers and pointers."
Story

( Permalink: Has Unix Programming Changed in 20 Years?      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 3, 2004 )

Building a solid-state mini-ITX Linux recorder
"This simple embedded Linux project builds a dedicated music recording and editing computer that uses a CompactFlash card instead of a hard drive, to eliminate hard disk chatter. The project is simple because it starts with an embedded Linux distribution: a "Live CD" released last week by the Agnula Project. "
Story

( Permalink: Building a solid-state mini-ITX Linux recorder      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 3, 2004 )

What Exactly Is Computer Forensics?
Computer forensics involves the preservation, identification, extraction, documentation and interpretation of computer data. It is often more of an art than a science, but as in any discipline, computer forensic specialists follow clear, well-defined methodologies and procedures, and flexibility is expected and encouraged when encountering the unusual. It is unfortunate that computer forensics is sometimes misunderstood as being somehow different from other types of investigations. ebcvg.com

( Permalink: What Exactly Is Computer Forensics?      Submitted by MarekB Thu Jun 3, 2004 )

Web Database Applications with PHP & MySQL
"If you are looking to get up to speed on developing on the web using PHP and mySQL, I couldn't think of a better introduction to the topic than this book. A newer version was just released this month that includes info on using PEAR, more templating, and introductions to PHP5 and mySQL 4.1. I give it four out of five Zealots."
Story

( Permalink: Web Database Applications with PHP & MySQL      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 3, 2004 )

EIOffice: The good, the bad, and the ugly
"Evermore Integrated Office is an extremely promising new Java-based office suite that currently runs on both Linux and Windows, with versions slated for Mac and Solaris. EIOffice is a remarkably faithful clone of Microsoft Office, with a twist -- it provides a level of integration unmatched by any office suite on the market. It's not without problems, though, a couple of which take EIOffice out of the running for some organizations."
Story

( Permalink: EIOffice: The good, the bad, and the ugly      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 3, 2004 )

Printing Tips for the Solaris Operating System
"Although it is generally taken for granted, printing can give you problems if you are new to UNIX or lack the information needed to get your document to your printer of choice. The following is intended to be a brief primer on printing from the Solaris environment, so you will have the information you need. Once you are up to speed, you can go right back to taking printing for granted. Now, on with a little printing Q&A. "
Story

( Permalink: Printing Tips for the Solaris Operating System      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 3, 2004 )

The Next G5 Revision
"Soon, at the Worldwide Developers' Conference in San Fransisco, Apple will preview to many hundreds of users the next revision of Mac OS X, version 10.4. There is virtually no way to predict, without insider info, what this new version will feature. So far, no one has that insider info. But hardware is more predictable. Sometimes Apple caters to the demands of its users, and other times, it ignores them entirely, forcing upon them what it believes is best for the world. Here we have a few new ideas that we believe Apple will probably implement in the next G5 revision, in no particular order. "
Story

( Permalink: The Next G5 Revision      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 2, 2004 )

Introducing the Tactile Pro
"I've found very few keyboards with a feel that I like. As computers have become more of a commodity and less of an exclusive tool, emphasis on quality and detail have fallen behind. When I lost the use of a beige G3 minitower on my desk, I also had to say goodbye to the Apple Extended II keyboard. I had resigned to the fact that I would probably never touch another keyboard as good as the Extended II, so you can imagine the sprrroiioinggng sound my eyeballs made when I saw the advertisement for the Matias Tactile Pro."
Story

( Permalink: Introducing the Tactile Pro      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 2, 2004 )

Socket 939: New Socket, New Athlon 64s
"There used to be a time that a fast memory subsystem and 64-bit addressing was the privilege of ultra expensive workstation and server CPUs. Back in 2000, we were amazed that the Alpha 21264 featured a 128-bit Interleaved memory bus. Today the Athlon 64 3800+ and 3500+ are the newest mass market 64-bit CPUs from AMD, and they are equipped with one of the most powerful memory controllers found in modern systems. The new Athlon 64 Newcastle on the Socket 939 platform has access to a 128-bit wide memory bus and can make use of the fastest unbuffered DDR400 CAS2 memory."
Story

( Permalink: Socket 939: New Socket, New Athlon 64s      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 2, 2004 )

Should Java class exceptions always be checked?
Most of the advice on the use of exceptions in the Java language suggests that checked exceptions should be preferred in any case where an exception conceivably might be caught. Recently, several prominent writers have started to come to the position that unchecked exceptions may have more of a place in good Java class design than previously thought. This article looks at the pros and cons of using unchecked exceptions.

( Permalink: Should Java class exceptions always be checked?      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Jun 2, 2004 )

SpecOpS Labs response to Wine Project
osViews/osOpinion received the following letter from SpecOpS Labs. This letter is in response to the WINE HQ Weekly Newsletter, Issue 222 dated May 14, 2004, entitled "PROJECT DAVID USES CODEWEAVERS CROSSOVER OFFICE".
Their objective in writing this letter is to clear up some of the issues raised on the statements contained in the aforementioned Newsletter, which they believe might misrepresent their efforts to expand the availability of Windows applications on Linux.

( Permalink: SpecOpS Labs response to Wine Project      Submitted by Kelly McNeill Wed Jun 2, 2004 )

Bacula - Sony SDT 10000
"Bacula is the network backup solution. I've been using since (just over a year). I'm pretty impressed with it. At BSDCan I was presented with a Sony STD 10000 DAT drive, a donation from a reader, which will help with my backups and with my work on Bacula."
Story

( Permalink: Bacula - Sony SDT 10000      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 2, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
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Older News

Doctor Prescribes Linux
(Thu Feb 5, 2004)

The Linux Audio Server Project
(Thu Feb 5, 2004)

Unofficial SuSE FAQ
(Thu Feb 5, 2004)

Processor Benchmarks
(Thu Feb 5, 2004)

Basic Use of pthreads
(Thu Feb 5, 2004)

A Happy MythTV User Shows the Way
(Wed Feb 4, 2004)

Secure Electronic Registration and Voting
(Wed Feb 4, 2004)

SUSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.1
(Wed Feb 4, 2004)

Sharp Zaurus SL-5600
(Wed Feb 4, 2004)

POWER Programmer Primer
(Wed Feb 4, 2004)

How the Linux Kernel Gets Built
(Wed Feb 4, 2004)

SCO Distributed Denial of Service Scenarios
(Tue Feb 3, 2004)

Intel Pentium4 Prescott
(Tue Feb 3, 2004)

Caution: This Game is Pathological
(Tue Feb 3, 2004)

Introduction to Unix and Linux
(Tue Feb 3, 2004)

Stallman in India
(Tue Feb 3, 2004)

Talin: Linux Laptops
(Tue Feb 3, 2004)

Election Boxes Easy to Mess With
(Mon Feb 2, 2004)

Thread Level Parallelism Explained
(Mon Feb 2, 2004)

SuSE Linux AMD64 Enterprise Server Review
(Mon Feb 2, 2004)

A Visit from the FBI
(Mon Feb 2, 2004)

Linux Steps Into the Limelight
(Mon Feb 2, 2004)

Version Control Systems
(Mon Feb 2, 2004)

Pingus
(Sun Feb 1, 2004)

LibraNet
(Sun Feb 1, 2004)

Intel Shifts 64-Bit Emphasis
(Sun Feb 1, 2004)

FreeBSD 5.2 Review
(Sun Feb 1, 2004)

Ark Linux 1.0 Alpha 10.1
(Sat Jan 31, 2004)

Mandrake Linux 10 Preview
(Sat Jan 31, 2004)

GNU/Linux Home Desktop Kit PC Project Part 5
(Sat Jan 31, 2004)

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