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Securing the Wireless Enterprise
With recent technological advances, wireless devices are well positioned to add value as corporate productivity tools. Investments in this area have the potential to provide widespread improvements in mobile worker efficiency, business activity monitoring, exception handling, and organizational throughput. While the potential gains are impressive, many organizations are waiting to deploy this technology due to security concerns. Companies which wait may indeed feel secure. eBCVG

( Permalink: Securing the Wireless Enterprise      Submitted by Dr.T Thu Jun 10, 2004 )

Harry Potter sorcery done with Linux eServer
A small London-based company The Moving Picture Company (MPC) has partnered with IBM, for their Digital content creation solution, using xSeries systems running Red Hat Linux, to cast a spell on moviegoers across the world with digital imagery created in tiny spaces a fraction of the size of the enormous picture production studios used in Hollywood. The company is using IBM eServers in a state-of-the-art digital lab, bringing the worlds of J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter), Homer ("Troy") and Lara Croft's ("Tomb Raider") to life.

( Permalink: Harry Potter sorcery done with Linux eServer      Submitted by Anonymous Thu Jun 10, 2004 )

More on AirPort Express
"The new AirPort Express base station can connect directly to a broadband DSL or cable modem via its single Ethernet jack, or it can use Wireless Distribution System (WDS) to join an existing AirPort Extreme or AirPort Express network. Apple said that while the AirPort Express's version of WDS might work with base stations from other companies (we've found compatibility with gear from Buffalo Technologies, for instance; see "AirPorts Where the Buffalo Roam" in TidBITS-696), the lack of a standard for WDS meant they could only guarantee it would work with Apple equipment. If your existing network doesn't support WDS, you must tie in the AirPort Express via its Ethernet jack."
Story

( Permalink: More on AirPort Express      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 9, 2004 )

Illustrating the imagination
"Probably best known for his groundbreaking illustrations of 76 covers for Neil Gaiman’s “Sandman” series of graphic novels, the English, bearded McKean has also applied his explosive talent to book design and illustration, esoteric comic book illustration, CD cover design, advertising photography, writing — even composing jazz."
Story

( Permalink: Illustrating the imagination      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 9, 2004 )

A New Task For Mac OS X - Exokernels
"An exokernel, however, hands off control to an application if it needs it, and doesn't give power to processes that shouldn't have it. If all elements of the system that normally slow operations down, like virtual memory, and the filesystem, are stored as application libraries, then programs can access them directly without bothering the kernel with otherwise unnecessary system calls. Thus, instead of assuming that every and all requests need to be processed through every level of the system's hierarchy, an application can opt to use the most efficient route. "
Story

( Permalink: A New Task For Mac OS X - Exokernels      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 9, 2004 )

VMWare Workstation 4.5 Review
"Being a true fan of virtualization software, I'm ready now to test out the new VMWare Workstation 4.5 after my comparison between Virtual PC 2004 and VMWare 4.0. Many users of VMWare and Virtual PC surely asked themselves if this new VMWare version it's an evolution or a revolution. Since a transition from v4.0 to v4.5 may not appear as shocking to the consumer as a "shining" 5.0 product version release, we'll see what the new VMWare release has to offer to all of us, performance-stability-hungry developers and power users."
Story

( Permalink: VMWare Workstation 4.5 Review      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 9, 2004 )

OpenBSD: Monolithic Simplicity
"A recent thread on the OpenBSD project's misc@ mailing list discussed why OpenBSD has chosen to stick to a purely monolithic kernel, instead of trying to optimize performance by using kernel modules. As described in the OpenBSD FAQ, the OpenBSD team only supports the GENERIC kernel that is provided with the distribution. Numerous reasons were provided, including security, the ability to fully test, and simplicity."
Story

( Permalink: OpenBSD: Monolithic Simplicity      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 9, 2004 )

Drive recovery comes to Linux
"Both companies agree, for recovery purposes, a drive is a drive at the component level. Both companies work with a variety of drive manufacturers and maintain inventories of parts and clean room facilities. However, there can be variation at the file system level. Both companies handle a range of Linux file systems. "OnTrack supports EXT2, EXT3, XFS, and ReiserFS," says Ontrack's director of software and services Jim Reinert. "Our tools and procedures become specialized for each file system." When asked what file systems DriveSavers supports, John Christopher, a data recovery engineer and spokesman for DriveSavers, answers with a simple and unquantified "all of them.""
Story

( Permalink: Drive recovery comes to Linux      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 9, 2004 )

Kernel 2.6 on a Hyperthreaded Pentium 4
"What if the microprocessor can process two instruction streams in parallel? Doing this will require that it maintains two sets of `architectural state' (general purpose registers, instruction pointer etc), but the execution units (the ALU, FPU) need not be duplicated. It is said that this can be done with very little hardware (and thus, cost) overhead. Now we can visualize two instruction streams in memory - the microprocessor maintaining two instruction pointers and fetching instructions from both the streams. Because the execution units are not duplicated, it would be impossible for the microprocessor to really execute two instruction simultaneously - but what if an instruction from one stream takes a long time to complete (maybe, it is doing I/O - or there was a cache miss and its waiting for data to arrive from main memory). During this period, the microprocessor can execute instructions from the other stream using the execution units which are sitting idle. This is the basis of Hyperthreading ..."
Story

( Permalink: Kernel 2.6 on a Hyperthreaded Pentium 4      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 9, 2004 )

A Linux Implementation of Mobility Using SIP
"SIP allows two or more participants to establish a session consisting of multiple media streams using text-based request and response messages. A user, termed a SIP endpoint, is addressed by a SIP URL in the form of an e-mail address, such as sip:alice@vocal.com or sip:alice@192.168.0.2. The application used for communication is called the user agent (UA). Call initiation and modification is done through INVITE messages of SIP. Two endpoints can communicate with each other directly, or they can make use of a SIP entity called the redirect server. The user first sends the request for call initiation to this server, which queries a location service to retrieve the IP address and port of the other user. The location service keeps track of the current location of the users."
Story

( Permalink: A Linux Implementation of Mobility Using SIP      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 9, 2004 )

What You Need to Know When Developing a Grid App
Get up-to-speed on the latest in Grid Computing application development. 1) Global Grid Forum; 2) Open standards architecture; 3) GGF and grid data; 4) Modeling and Managing State; 5) GGF Security.

( Permalink: What You Need to Know When Developing a Grid App      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Jun 9, 2004 )

Mac OS X Security Update
"Security Update 2004-06-07 delivers a number of security enhancements and is recommended for all Macintosh users. The purpose of this update is to increase security by alerting you when opening an application for the first time via document mappings or a web address (URL). Please see this article for more details, including a description of the new alert dialog box. "
Story

( Permalink: Mac OS X Security Update      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 8, 2004 )

Apple Pumps Music Through Air 
"The AirPort Express has several uses. On the road, it can be used to set up an instant Wi-Fi network in, say, a hotel room with an Internet connection. At home, the device can be plugged into a stereo and used to receive tunes wirelessly from a Wi-Fi-equipped computer, or utilized to share a USB printer among several machines on a wireless network."
Story

( Permalink: Apple Pumps Music Through Air       Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 8, 2004 )

BYOB: Build Your Own Browser, Part 3
"Next, set the other default values for the WebView preferences. I prefer to deselect all of the preferences except the "Maintain back/forward list" (this needs to be checked, because it is set on an instance basis, not a shared basis), so that I know what the default state is. Once we get our preferences window fully developed, the values will be loaded whenever we start the program, so the default values can be set to whatever you want. Save the file, and we are done!"
Story

( Permalink: BYOB: Build Your Own Browser, Part 3      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 8, 2004 )

A Survey of DVD Recording Formats
"One of the interesting aspects of the IT industry is its never-ending list of jargons. Every day we are drowning in a sea of computer jargon. This happened to me recently when I was sourcing for a DVD writer to burn some OS images. What I originally imagined would be a simple process turned out to be a day of research and study. With so many variations of DVD formats, which one is the right one for me? Should I buy a writer that supports “-“ or “+”. And is 4X fast enough for me? This article is the result of my quest for the right DVD writer to buy. I hope the article will give you a better idea of the various DVD recording formats to choose from."
Story

( Permalink: A Survey of DVD Recording Formats      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 8, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

DamnSmall Linux and LNX-BBC
(Fri Feb 13, 2004)

Dave Thomas and Code Generation
(Fri Feb 13, 2004)

Slackware Linux 9.1 Installation
(Fri Feb 13, 2004)

Introduction to the Firebird Database
(Fri Feb 13, 2004)

The Secret World of ReiserFS
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

Firefox 0.8
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

An Oracle Instructor’s Guide to Oracle10G
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

Setting up K12LSTP4.0 Linux Terminal Server
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

Linux 2.6 Scales the Enterprise
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

OpenGL Development Tools
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

Blue Linux!! The Truth
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

Sendmail-SMTP-AUTH-TLS-Howto
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

Getting to Know Gnome
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

Securing Intranets with IPCop
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

Review - Securing Wireless LANs
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

Kernel Comparison: Web Serving on 2.4 and 2.6
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

High Availability and Redundancy
(Tue Feb 10, 2004)

Slax - an OS in Your Pocket
(Tue Feb 10, 2004)

Linux Untethered
(Tue Feb 10, 2004)

Host-Based Firewalls Implemented With Linux iptabl
(Tue Feb 10, 2004)

Installing phpMyAdmin on Linux
(Tue Feb 10, 2004)

Review of KDE 3.2
(Tue Feb 10, 2004)

Review of MandrakeMove
(Mon Feb 9, 2004)

Big Blue Linux?
(Mon Feb 9, 2004)

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3
(Mon Feb 9, 2004)

HP Helps U.S. Clamp Down on Counterfeiting
(Mon Feb 9, 2004)

Automating Security with GNU cfengine
(Mon Feb 9, 2004)

2.0 Linux Kernel Maintainer David Weinehall
(Mon Feb 9, 2004)

Inside a Linksys 802.11g Wireless Router
(Sun Feb 8, 2004)

Spawn of Debian Faceoff
(Sun Feb 8, 2004)

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