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Airport Express and Non-Mac wifi
"Wireless Distribution System (WDS) is a part of the 802.11 spec all the way back to IEEE 802.11b-1999. However, it was never made part of the Wi-Fi certification standard. In WDS, each Wi-Fi gateway acts essentially like a port on an Ethernet switch. They broadcast information to each other about what adapters are available on their particular segments. If a packet arrives that requires a hop, it's repackaged and delivered to the right "port" or wireless gateways."
Story

( Permalink: Airport Express and Non-Mac wifi      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 11, 2004 )

Guide to Enterprise Application Distribution
"Managing Mac OS X on hundreds of diverse computers throughout an enterprise organization creates many challenges for IT managers and staff. Many of these issues can be attributed to the differences between the Mac OS X and OS 9 security models, operating system architectures, and distribution and management tools. As an enterprise system administrator, it's important to evaluate the factors for distribution and deployment of software by tracking installations. In this article, I'll show you a few options to help you configure the best system for your situation."
Story

( Permalink: Guide to Enterprise Application Distribution      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 11, 2004 )

Rebuttal to Ken Brown
"Yes, I corrected myself. It was 6 man-years, not six real-time years. But in that time they wrote the complete operating system, a C compiler, and all the utilities. In his posting, Brown says the GNU C compiler is now 110,000 lines of code. Maybe the Coherent compiler was half that, or 60,000 lines of code. The MINIX utilities were about 30,000 lines of code and covered about the same ground as Coherent did. Add a 10,000 line kernel to this and it looks like the three Coherent programmers wrote 100,000 lines of code in 6 man-years. That is a productivity of 16,000 lines per man-year. In that light I don't see why it is plausible for Canadian students to produce 16,000 lines a year but not plausible for Finnish students to produce 10,000 lines a year. It is just as cold in Finland as in Canada so programmers are never tempted to go outside."
Story

( Permalink: Rebuttal to Ken Brown      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 11, 2004 )

Using Webmin for Linux Administration
In a two-part series, the use of Webmin for Linux administration is presented in an introductory format. Also included on site is a Q & A with Webmin developer Jamie Cameron. The column is here and the Q & A with Jamie Cameron can be found at here

( Permalink: Using Webmin for Linux Administration      Submitted by Blane Warrene Fri Jun 11, 2004 )

Open Source Scores Gnome Goal
Software houses normally have strict processes governing the introduction of changes in functionality to products, with user requests and input playing a major role. Ascension IT Management Ltd. submiited the following editorial to osOpinion/osViews which asks if these changes were made at the request of Gnome's user-base to enhance their desktop experience, or if other factors were involved.

( Permalink: Open Source Scores Gnome Goal      Submitted by Kelly McNeill Fri Jun 11, 2004 )

Custom System Statistics Monitoring
"As a systems administrator, knowing the status of the systems in your network is a must. This can be quite a challenge when you are dealing with tens, hundreds or thousands of different systems. A multitude of options are available for obtaining systems statistics, many of them freely available. For my purposes, I had a number of different requirements that most packages did not meet. In the end, I opted to build my own. This article explains the design of my solution, as well as its installation and configuration for use in your own environment."
Story

( Permalink: Custom System Statistics Monitoring      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 11, 2004 )

Small Form Factor Box
"One theme that kept coming to the forefront in our discussions of the hows and whys of SFF systems was that of sexiness. With their brushed aluminum, sleek black, or pearl white exteriors, SFF boxes have a certain visual appeal that other cases lack. So for some, the choice of an SFF system can be just as much about aesthetics as it is performance. With the multitude of SFF choices available, there is seldom any need to sacrifice performance for a looks. In putting together this guide, we found so many nice-looking system that we complied a "SFF centerfold" ó a page devoted to the nicest-looking cases we could find."
Story

( Permalink: Small Form Factor Box      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 11, 2004 )

Encrypting partitions using dm-crypt
"dm-crypt provides a crypto layer for Device-mapper. A Device-mapper driver allows you to define new partitions or logical volumes by specifying ranges of sectors on existing block devices. The ranges of sectors to be used by these partitions is mapped to targets according to a mapping table. dm-crypt provides just such a target which can be used to transparently encrypt a block device using the new 2.6 kernel cryptoAPI."
Story

( Permalink: Encrypting partitions using dm-crypt      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 11, 2004 )

Review: Mariner Write 3.6
"Marinerís answer to Excel, a spreadsheet program called Calc, got me out of a messy situation once before, when for some reason, which I no longer remember, I needed to work with more columns than Excel could handle. I donít have a lot of familiarity with spreadsheet programs, but Calc let me do what I needed to do with a minimum of fuss. So when I heard about Mariner Write 3.6, I decided to give it a shot."
Story

( Permalink: Review: Mariner Write 3.6      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 10, 2004 )

Apple Touts Super-Cooled G5s†
"Based on 64-bit PowerPC processors from IBM, the new G5s are available in three basic configurations: dual 1.8 GHz, dual 2.0 GHz and dual 2.5 GHz. The 1.8-GHz and 2.0-GHz boxes are available now starting at $2,000 and $2,500, respectively. The 2.5-GHz machine will ship in July, and cost $3,000. The fastest model features a new liquid cooling system -- a first for Apple but common among overclockers."
Story

( Permalink: Apple Touts Super-Cooled G5s†      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 10, 2004 )

Power Mac G5
"Mac OS X really shines when it divvies up tasks between two CPUs, and now the Power Mac G5 offers dual processor models across the board at 1.8GHz, 2GHz and 2.5GHz, for a substantial speed boost at the top of the line. The 2.5GHz model packs so much power into tight quarters that Apple designed a liquid cooling system, resulting in a cool tower that runs Photoshop nearly two times faster than a Pentium 4-based system. In fact, for most creative endeavors, the Power Mac G5 simply has no competition in its class."
Story

( Permalink: Power Mac G5      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 10, 2004 )

A tutorial on vim
"Editing with vi can be a nightmarish experience for newbies of unices. But it is one of the most popular editors in the unix world, and nearly all unix boxes are equipped with some variant of vi. Vim is a widely popular clone of vi. Developed by Braam Moolenaar, vim has been ported to a wide number of platforms including Microsoft windows, all flavors of Unices, amiga, mac... etc. Gvim is the graphical front end of vim. This article aims to take that fear out of a newbie and give some editing tips to increase the productivity of an intermediate/advanced vim user."
Story

( Permalink: A tutorial on vim      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 10, 2004 )

Understanding Fear of the Gnu
'Open source software is a serious threat to all that is good and true and right in this country.' Not surprising and easily dismissed as anti-GNU (GNU's not Unix) rhetoric from a company that is running scared, but the issues are much older, wobblier and more complex than "Windows good, Linux bad." Wesley Parish submitted the following editorial to osOpinion/osViews which explores the use of GNU software from the perspective than many large businesses might take before taking the plunge.

( Permalink: Understanding Fear of the Gnu      Submitted by Kelly McNeill Thu Jun 10, 2004 )

Best practices for storage security
IT professionals have learned the hard way in recent years that disaster can strike at anytime and that they must be prepared.
Story

( Permalink: Best practices for storage security      Submitted by LogError Thu Jun 10, 2004 )

An inside look at the Gaming industry
Twenty years ago, when I wrote computer games for a living, the industry was pretty straightforward. I wrote games, the company packaged them (well before the advent of CD-ROMs and CD-ROM drives for PCs, games were distributed on cassettes -- can you believe it?) and sold them. My employer made good money, I made more money than a college student could make most other legal ways, and I got to play all the computer and arcade games I wanted. Life in the game industry was good! But I got bored, joined Real Business, and started working with Enterprise Applications. The years flew by and here I am again, working with the game industry. This article gives you an inside look at how the online Gaming industry works today and how to setup an online game as a business.

( Permalink: An inside look at the Gaming industry      Submitted by Anonymous Thu Jun 10, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

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Older News

Apache Keys and Certificates with mod_ssl
(Mon Feb 16, 2004)

Cubicleware: Sun's JDS vs. Ximian XD2
(Mon Feb 16, 2004)

Writing man Pages
(Mon Feb 16, 2004)

Chrooting Apache and PHP in BSD
(Sun Feb 15, 2004)

Kernel comparison: Web serving on 2.4 and 2.6
(Sun Feb 15, 2004)

Is There Room for Mandrake in the Enterprise?
(Sun Feb 15, 2004)

VoIPv6 on Linux with VOVIDA
(Sun Feb 15, 2004)

Can't Get Enough Desktops!
(Sat Feb 14, 2004)

Rapid Application Development Tools
(Sat Feb 14, 2004)

Joseph Cheek of Lycoris
(Sat Feb 14, 2004)

Automated Backups with Existing Tools
(Sat Feb 14, 2004)

Libranet - The installation
(Sat Feb 14, 2004)

Linux In Dubai
(Sat Feb 14, 2004)

Securing Vote Tallies
(Fri Feb 13, 2004)

Real Problems
(Fri Feb 13, 2004)

DamnSmall Linux and LNX-BBC
(Fri Feb 13, 2004)

Dave Thomas and Code Generation
(Fri Feb 13, 2004)

Slackware Linux 9.1 Installation
(Fri Feb 13, 2004)

Introduction to the Firebird Database
(Fri Feb 13, 2004)

The Secret World of ReiserFS
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

Firefox 0.8
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

An Oracle Instructorís Guide to Oracle10G
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

Setting up K12LSTP4.0 Linux Terminal Server
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

Linux 2.6 Scales the Enterprise
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

OpenGL Development Tools
(Thu Feb 12, 2004)

Blue Linux!! The Truth
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

Sendmail-SMTP-AUTH-TLS-Howto
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

Getting to Know Gnome
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

Securing Intranets with IPCop
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

Review - Securing Wireless LANs
(Wed Feb 11, 2004)

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