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What does your firewall sound like?
"This is a little fun for those of you who like playing with shell scripts. I going to outline how you can literally hear packets pinging off of your firewall. If your Linux system has an iptables firewall, you may have noticed dropped packets being logged in /var/log/messages - something like:"
Story

( Permalink: What does your firewall sound like?      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 15, 2004 )

Managing Linux configuration files
The average developer spends more time navigating, learning, and debugging configuration files than you'd expect. But you can save that time -- and loads of energy and frustration -- with one of the tools you probably use every day: your CVS tree. Take these tips on backing up, distributing, and making portable your peskiest Linux™ (and UNIX®) config files.

( Permalink: Managing Linux configuration files      Submitted by Anonymous Tue Jun 15, 2004 )

TKCluster
"The one area in which Linux still starves for attention is in the realm of lightweight, easily configured, affordable high-availability -- a general-purpose cluster. A general-purpose, high availability cluster must be "application agnostic" -- it should not care what runs on it, whether it be Web server, mail server, database server, or any future, yet-unknown type of service. The cluster should give a uniform style of operation no matter what application is running. In response to this, I have written TKCluster (when I initially wrote it, I couldn't think of a good name for it, so I just prefixed "cluster" with my initials)."
Story

( Permalink: TKCluster      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 15, 2004 )

The Shellcoder's Handbook
"The Shellcoder’s Handbook is far from the first book to talk about holes and weaknesses in applications and operating systems; it is just simply the best. Randomly pick a handful of pages from this book, and you’ll find more information in those pages that you’ll find in most other security books. Without exaggeration, the 24 chapters of this book are crammed with concise, detailed information that will make your head spin."
Story

( Permalink: The Shellcoder's Handbook      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 15, 2004 )

Helen Borrie on the Future of Firebird
"Firebird is a commercially independent project of C and C++ programmers, technical advisors and supporters developing and enhancing a multiplatform database-management system based on the source code released under the InterBase Public License. In an interview with LinuxInsider, Helen Borrie, project team administrator and author of a forthcoming book on Firebird, provided an inside look at the project and where Firebird is headed."
Story

( Permalink: Helen Borrie on the Future of Firebird      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 15, 2004 )

A tutorial on vim (2 of 3 parts)
"This is the second part of the three part tutorial on vim. (The first part of this article is here. In this article, we will deal with vim method of search and replace, editing more than one file on a single session of vim, and editing more than one file with more than one window. You will learn how to create vim windows even in a text-only environment (like a terminal). Also you will get familiar with vim method of solving some day to day editing chores"
Story

( Permalink: A tutorial on vim (2 of 3 parts)      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 15, 2004 )

Hacking BSD
"The previous commands are great for finding binaries and manpages, but what if you want to find a particular word in one of your own text files? That requires the notoriously user-unfriendly find command. Let's be realistic. Even with all of your Unix experience, you still have to dig into either the manpage or a good book whenever you need to find something. Can you really expect novice users to figure it out?"
Story

( Permalink: Hacking BSD      Submitted by Noel Mon Jun 14, 2004 )

Review: iStumbler 86
"I’ve always tried to avoid being that geek with the wireless network-sensing keychain. I spend a lot of time with my 15" Titanium PowerBook, and when I’m in an airport bar or a downtown cafe it’s nice to have Internet access, but unfortunately I don’t always know whether there’s an open wireless network available. Enter iStumbler, stage left."
Story

( Permalink: Review: iStumbler 86      Submitted by Noel Mon Jun 14, 2004 )

System migration tool simplifies setup of new G5s
"When you first boot your new G5, the first thing you will be asked by the Setup Assistant is if you have an old computer you would like to migrate data from. If you answer yes, setup assistant instructs you to plug a FireWire in from the new machine to the old one and restart the old computer in FireWire Target Disk mode (hold down the "T" key on restart)."
Story

( Permalink: System migration tool simplifies setup of new G5s      Submitted by Noel Mon Jun 14, 2004 )

Create your own Honeywall with a bootable CDROM
"The key element of any Honeynet is the gateway, this is what seperates the Honeynet victims. from the rest of the world. The gateway acts as a wall, in fact we call the gateway a Honeywall. All traffic entering or leaving the Honeynet must go through this Honeywall. This becomes your command and control center for the Honeynet, all the magic happens here. You can see an example of our proposed Honeynet architecture in Figure A. In this example, our gateway is a layer two bridge. A layer three routing gateway can be used, but a bridge is preferred, as it is harder to detect. In our diagram, our Honeynet is deployed on an internal 192.168.1.0/24 network. In the past, most Honeynets have traditionally been deployed on external or perimiter networks."
Story

( Permalink: Create your own Honeywall with a bootable CDROM      Submitted by Noel Mon Jun 14, 2004 )

Creating custom keyboard layouts for X11 using XKB
"In most modern desktop environments there is a small applet that allows users to quickly switch between keyboard layouts when they need to type text in more than one language. However, there are situations where this solution is not quite satisfactory. Some writing jobs (that of a translator, for example) require writing text in which words from several languages are intermixed, which would make frequent switches between keyboard layouts necessary. This is a big inconvenience, even when keyboard shortcuts are used to switch between layouts. Another problem is that the logical keyboard layouts used may sometimes not fit the physical keyboard layout very well, resulting in a confusing setup."
Story

( Permalink: Creating custom keyboard layouts for X11 using XKB      Submitted by Noel Mon Jun 14, 2004 )

Java Desktop System 2 Review
"Imagine for a moment that Windows XP came with Office XP Professional and Visual Studio .NET preinstalled with it. Imagine it was significantly more secure and easier to use. Imagine that it only cost $50 for all of that software. Sun's new Java Desktop System Release 2 is like the bizarro world equivalent of that kind of Microsoft software package. It's essentially in the same league except it doesn't use Microsoft technologies; the operating system is based on GNU/Linux with proprietary add-ons for system management; you have StarOffice 7 and Evolution 1.45 instead of Office XP; and you have Java Studio Standard (formerly known as Sun ONE Studio) instead of Visual Studio .NET. Sounds great, doesn't it? If only it actually worked."
Story

( Permalink: Java Desktop System 2 Review      Submitted by Noel Mon Jun 14, 2004 )

Interesting Things to Know about MySQL
"If you do a lot of tracking, you may want to write the information to a Berkeley DB. Contrary to the name Berkeley DB is not a database but a hash, or there is an option for b-tree format. MySQL can use Berkeley DB for the underlying table structure. It's very fast, and you won't get logs of your logs. If you're using Linux, Berkeley DB is already installed on your system. Ok, so how does one use Berkeley DB? Samples can be found at the following link. Look for berkeleydb_0.x.x.tar.gz at the following link"
Story

( Permalink: Interesting Things to Know about MySQL      Submitted by Noel Mon Jun 14, 2004 )

phpstack - A TCP/IP Stack and Webserver in PHP
"phpstack contains a very, very simple TCP/IP stack. The stack is tailored explicitly for the purpose of answering pings, incoming TCP requests, opening up a connection, and sending out responses to incoming data. This functionality is enough to be able to support a small web server. The stack does not handle two-way communication, nor does it have the ability to support long-running connections."
Story

( Permalink: phpstack - A TCP/IP Stack and Webserver in PHP      Submitted by Noel Mon Jun 14, 2004 )

Schiller talks security; update fixes outstanding
"Schiller said Apple would accept criticism on communicating with its customers and improve the language in the updates beginning with the one issued today. Apple is also placing the URL for its security Web site in related software updates to make people more aware of resources that are -- and have been for some time -- available to them."
Story

( Permalink: Schiller talks security; update fixes outstanding      Submitted by Noel Sun Jun 13, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

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Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Review of EvilEntity
(Sat Feb 21, 2004)

Fedora Core and Red Hat Professional Workstation
(Fri Feb 20, 2004)

The ChessBrain Project
(Fri Feb 20, 2004)

Building PHP Web services with PEAR
(Fri Feb 20, 2004)

whatis and apropos
(Fri Feb 20, 2004)

Making the ViewSonic Tablet PC Run Linux
(Fri Feb 20, 2004)

VMware Workstation 4.0.5
(Fri Feb 20, 2004)

An Introduction to Linux in Ten Commands
(Thu Feb 19, 2004)

Understanding Packet Filter
(Thu Feb 19, 2004)

Novell: Patient Men, Proper Conduct
(Thu Feb 19, 2004)

Tripwire on your Fedora Box
(Thu Feb 19, 2004)

James Atkinson , Founder of phpBB
(Thu Feb 19, 2004)

Improvements in Kernel Development From 2.4 to 2.6
(Thu Feb 19, 2004)

Bruce Schneier, Cryptographer
(Wed Feb 18, 2004)

XandrosOS: User-Friendly to a Fault
(Wed Feb 18, 2004)

Wireless Honeypot Trickery
(Wed Feb 18, 2004)

Gunnar Schmi Dt
(Wed Feb 18, 2004)

Via Epia-M10000 Mini-ITX Motherboard
(Wed Feb 18, 2004)

Newbies take on LiveCDs Everybody Wins
(Wed Feb 18, 2004)

Rexx for Everyone
(Wed Feb 18, 2004)

Using GnuPG, Part I
(Tue Feb 17, 2004)

Inside Scorched 3D
(Tue Feb 17, 2004)

InfoSec in Campus and Open Environments
(Tue Feb 17, 2004)

Solaris 10
(Tue Feb 17, 2004)

Monitoring Net Traffic with OpenBSD's Packet Filte
(Tue Feb 17, 2004)

Mepis Linux Founder Warren Woodford
(Tue Feb 17, 2004)

Memory Hygiene in C and C++
(Tue Feb 17, 2004)

Touch Screen Voting Security
(Mon Feb 16, 2004)

Migrating to the Linux 2.6 Kernel
(Mon Feb 16, 2004)

Safely Creating Temporary Files in Shell Scripts
(Mon Feb 16, 2004)

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