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Create Nifty Quicktime VRs
"Apple creates them with their QuickTime Virtual Reality software, and you can too. In the world of computer related jobs it is hard to find something that pays well at entry level, requires minimal learning time, and on top of that is fun. Creating professional VRs is one job that fulfills all the above requirements. If you know how to use a digital camera with a tripod, the ability to turn a tripod in a circle, and the finger muscles to push the button on the camera, you should be able to create a basic VR. "
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( Permalink: Create Nifty Quicktime VRs      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 18, 2004 )

My Experiences With the Shiira Web Browser
"The strange thing about Shiira is that I feel like it's actually Safari. It feels so complete already that it's like it's been around for years, undergoing steady development. Did I mention that Shiira's default green buttons are much better looking and more responsive than Safari's UI? Window resizing is faster too. The View Page Source window makes tags blue, comments red, and content text black. Everywhere you look, there are minor improvements to your browsing experience. "
Story

( Permalink: My Experiences With the Shiira Web Browser      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 18, 2004 )

Map Your Mind With NovaMind
"My problem with mapping (like activities of the past) was that they were slow and cumbersome. They lacked tangibility, they were static, slowed down my brainstorming process, and they were direly boring. This, however, is not the case with NovaMind. Since NovaMind has the advantage of being in a dynamic environment on the computer, this allows it to be amazingly useful. I found myself mind-mapping with ease just after a few minutes. I was able to capture all of my ideas as they came, then organize them as I saw fit."
Story

( Permalink: Map Your Mind With NovaMind      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 18, 2004 )

The Grumpy Editor's guide to terminal emulators
"But first: a word on color in terminal emulators; this is a subject on which your editor can get truly grumpy. Many developers have jumped into adding color support to terminal-oriented applications with little regard for basic human factors and usability. A usable terminal should not look like the Las Vegas strip at night. Color usage, to be effective, must be subtle and carefully thought out. In particular:"
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( Permalink: The Grumpy Editor's guide to terminal emulators      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 18, 2004 )

Book Review: Postfix: The Definitive Guide
"Even when the competition stiffens, though, I think PTDG will hold its own. One of the reasons is its accuracy. With few exceptions, readers can have confidence that PTDG correctly reflects the reality of Postfix software. Beyond the publisher's errata, the worst flaw I noticed is the misleading "Executing make creates a Makefile ..." on page 225. It's easy to speculate that the editorial process simply stumbled slightly in Appendix C, and even in this case there's no permanent harm."
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( Permalink: Book Review: Postfix: The Definitive Guide      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 18, 2004 )

dnsmasq mini DNS/DHCP/BOOTP Server
"To show you how straight forward things can be, let's setup DNS and DHCP for a home/small-office system. The setup is designed to only respond to queries from inside the local network which is on eth0 in this example. It will forward any queries outside its jurisdiction to upstream servers and cache the results locally. To keep the example simple we'll have the server running DNS also handle email for the entire internal network (a common scenario)."
Story

( Permalink: dnsmasq mini DNS/DHCP/BOOTP Server      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 18, 2004 )

Weave a neural net with Python
Neural nets, also known as artificial neural networks, mathematically model bioelectrical networks in the brain. Massively parallel and more inductive than deductive, they are used for everything from voice and character recognition to artificial intelligence. Python developer Andrew Blais introduces you to the simplest of the neural nets, the Hopfield -- and his net.py application gives you a hands-on opportunity to explore its ability to reconstruct distorted patterns.

( Permalink: Weave a neural net with Python      Submitted by Anonymous Fri Jun 18, 2004 )

Running TIBCO Rendezvous on the Solaris OS
"This document explains best practices for running TIBCO Rendezvous on the Solaris Operating System (OS). As always, best practices that are recommended today may outlive their usefulness as newer and better versions of the applications, OS, and hardware become available. It is therefore imperative to understand the underlying rationale for setting a particular parameter. The second section of this document attempts to explain the inner workings of the Solaris OS. This should help the user understand the significance of a particular parameter and make a more informed decision with respect to its use."
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( Permalink: Running TIBCO Rendezvous on the Solaris OS      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 18, 2004 )

Encryption: XML Digital signatures in a nutshell
"Digitally signing a document requires the originator to create a hash of the message itself and then encrypt that hash value with his own private key. Only the originator has that private key, and only he can encrypt the hash so that it can be unencrypted using his public key.The recipient, upon receiving both the message and the encrypted hash value, can decrypt the hash value, knowing the originatorís public key.The recipient must also try to generate the hash value of the message and compare the newly generated hash value with the unencrypted hash value received from the originator. If the hash values are identical, it proves that the originator created the message, because only the actual originator could encrypt the hash value correctly. "
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( Permalink: Encryption: XML Digital signatures in a nutshell      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 18, 2004 )

A Brief Introduction to GPS Photo Linking
"Do you ever look back through your vacation photos and wonder where all of the photos were taken? What if there was a way to have all those images automatically show up as pins on a map or an aerial photograph? It may seem too good to be true, but it can be done. No mirrors or smoke; it's just making use of existing GPS technology. As you are out recording pictures, your GPS receiver is busy making a digital popcorn trail of your movements. Then when you're back on the computer, a topo map or aerial photograph is pulled from a terraserver on the Internet, and your shots show up on the map as clickable links to your photographs."
Story

( Permalink: A Brief Introduction to GPS Photo Linking      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 17, 2004 )

The Music Man
"Mr. Jobs: Well, clearly we're doing some new stuff. I mean, the iPod grew from nothing to a billion-dollar-a-year business by year two. However, if you look at the core of Apple, what Apple is great at is figuring out how to invent cool technology but making it wonderfully easy to use. That's what we have always done. That's what the Mac was. That's what a lot of things we do are."
Story

( Permalink: The Music Man      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 17, 2004 )

Ars Technica sits down with Scott Collins
"As one can imagine, such a long and colorful history is bound to have its ups and downs. We ran into Scott Collins at this year's Penguicon and had a talk about Netscape, Mozilla, software development, and the web in general. Scott Collins was hired into Netscape in 1996 and was in the trenches during the "Browser Wars" all the way through to the axe cut at America Online of the Netscape team. A veteran software engineer, Scott has also worked on the Newton software at Apple Computer, and for Macromedia working on what would eventually be sold as Final Cut Pro."
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( Permalink: Ars Technica sits down with Scott Collins      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 17, 2004 )

Review : Kobo Delux
"This is an example of a relatively simple game that is COMPLETELY addictive and very clean and simple. I find myself constantly saying "Oh just one more level" even at 3am when I have to be up and working by 8:30. Not good, but nice to see it on a Linux platform. I don't have many gripes with the entire setup, the music is quite good, the sound is great, the playaction is good, and it's consistently challenging. What more could someone want?"
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( Permalink: Review : Kobo Delux      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 17, 2004 )

Debian Goodies
"The first two tools in the Debian Goodies package that I'd like to talk about are dgrep and dglob. The dgrep package is used to search files in an installed Debian package for a string. For example, if you've installed the debian-goodies package, you can search all files installed as part of that package for the term "help" like this:"
Story

( Permalink: Debian Goodies      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 17, 2004 )

Interruptible Database Queries
"One typical software design goal is responsiveness, understood as how easy and quick it is for the user to interrupt the current operation. Certain operations -- such as complex database queries; network I/O handling; extensive calculations; sorting of, or searching in, large data sets -- can take seconds or even minutes before they complete. Well-designed software allows the user to cancel such a long operation in progress. In this article I will demonstrate how to cancel a time-consuming database query by simply interrupting the thread in which the query runs. Such an interruptible database query will enable you to develop truly interactive programs that respond promptly even to the most impatient users."
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( Permalink: Interruptible Database Queries      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 17, 2004 )

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Apache-mod_ssl-PHP-Howto
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Ethernet Electric Razors
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Kernel Trouble
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Using the 2.6 Kernel with Your Current System
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Co-Founder Returns To Sun
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

The Trade Show Floor: The Invisible Demo
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Using MySQL from PHP
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) Study
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Linux on Dell Inspiron 8600
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

A Week with Slackware 9.1
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

Debunking Common GNU/Linux Myths
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

Configuring Web Logs in Apache
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

An Introduction to Wireless USB
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

SPARC Optimizations With GCC
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

Dealing With the End Of Life Of Red Hat Linux
(Mon Feb 23, 2004)

Defeating Nmap OS-Fingerprinting
(Mon Feb 23, 2004)

Rapid Application Development Tools
(Mon Feb 23, 2004)

A Computer Lab with No Windows
(Mon Feb 23, 2004)

Skolelinux Interview
(Mon Feb 23, 2004)

E-Voting Activists: Vote Absentee
(Mon Feb 23, 2004)

Introducing openMosix
(Sun Feb 22, 2004)

From OS/2 to Linux: Part 1
(Sun Feb 22, 2004)

Learning CVS Using KDE's Cervisia
(Sun Feb 22, 2004)

Sun's Software Express Program
(Sun Feb 22, 2004)

UDP Sockets-based Client Server Programs
(Sun Feb 22, 2004)

The Bash Shell
(Sun Feb 22, 2004)

SSL vs. IPsec
(Sat Feb 21, 2004)

Introducing LAMP Tuning Techniques
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Cutting Through the Hype of Atonomic Computing
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Debugging Tools for C
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