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Digital Hub Concepts in Software Design, Part 3
"Welcome back! In the previous installment of this series, we designed and built a flexible database (a "hub") that will store weather data as it pours in from all over the globe. However, the point of our hub-and-spoke design is that the data gets passed around to different scripts and programs that interact with it. It does not just sit in the database. The portable data is the "spoke" that will connect all of our client applications to the hub."
Story

( Permalink: Digital Hub Concepts in Software Design, Part 3      Submitted by Noel Sun Jun 20, 2004 )

Interview with Jean Tourrilhes
In an interview with LinuxQuestions.org, Jean Tourrilhes discusses how he first got introduced to Linux, OS zealotry, the origins of his famous Wireless How-to page, Linux on the desktop, the state of Linux wireless device driver support, the best and worst wireless chipset manufacturers, the biggest limitations of the current 802.11 implementations and his opinion on the emerging wireless networking standards.

( Permalink: Interview with Jean Tourrilhes      Submitted by jeremy Sun Jun 20, 2004 )

Switching to a New View
"However, the most important difference is price. While The MiniView Extreme 4-port can be purchased for a price in the neighborhood of $140, as of this writing, including four cables, the SwitchView rings up at $110-$130 without any KVM cables. If you need four of Avocent’s six-foot cables, you can add another $100 onto the price tag of the SwitchView, making the switch somewhere around fifty percent higher than the price of IOGear’s 4-port offering. "
Story

( Permalink: Switching to a New View      Submitted by Noel Sun Jun 20, 2004 )

Bitstream and Lycoris
"btX2 is Bitstream's font rasterizing subsystem for Linux. With btX2, developers receive everything -- fonts, font rendering engine, commercial use of native TrueType hints, and complete engineering support -- in one license agreement from one vendor. The quality of the text on the screen is an important factor here. We are starting to see a lot of interest in high-quality font rendering on the Linux platform, particularly for native hinting and anti-aliasing. "
Story

( Permalink: Bitstream and Lycoris      Submitted by Noel Sun Jun 20, 2004 )

Solaris 10 has self diagnostic/repairing features
"Grid containers Engineer Andrew Tucker said that one of the most common problems reported to Sun's support staff from data center customers is that they are only able to use 10 to 15 percent of the capacity of their systems, for various reasons. With the new Grid Containers, IT managers and sysadmins can partition disks so precisely that each user -- for all intents and purposes -- appears to have his or her own operating system on the desktop. Users and their applications do not interfere with each other, although admins can allow shared services and apps across the network if necessary."
Story

( Permalink: Solaris 10 has self diagnostic/repairing features      Submitted by Noel Sun Jun 20, 2004 )

Embedded Processor Quick Reference Guide
"In light of the extraordinary diversity and fast pace of development of these chips, LinuxDevices.com has created this Quick Reference Guide to embedded processors and system-on-chip ICs, which we hope will assist you in pinpointing solutions that match your embedded Linux based system requirements. Please note that this guide will be updated frequently, so be sure to check back periodically for the latest info. Also, be sure to take advantage of the abundant information available via the LinuxDevices.com search engine, which will turn up much additional information about SoCs that run Linux. "
Story

( Permalink: Embedded Processor Quick Reference Guide      Submitted by Noel Sun Jun 20, 2004 )

Tiny wall-wart sized T-Engine PC runs Linux, TRON
"The Teacube, or "tangerine computer," is based on an NEC Electronics VR5701 processor, with a MIPS core clocked at 266 or 333MHz. It includes 16MB of Flash memory, and 64MB of SDRAM. Interfaces include 2 x USB host, 2 x RS-232C serial, CompactFlash (IDE), 10/100 Ethernet, external video connector supporting up to 1280x1024 resolution with 65K colors, an eTRON port, and headphone and microphone ports. The device also includes a hardware real-time clock. "
Story

( Permalink: Tiny wall-wart sized T-Engine PC runs Linux, TRON      Submitted by Noel Sun Jun 20, 2004 )

Mail.app Enhancements: Juice Up Your Email Client
"ven with all of the improvements Mail has seen over the years, there are still some areas that need enhancing. Many power users and switchers from Windows are looking for a certain feature that was included in Outlook or Eudora, but not on their new application. Apple has made it relatively simple for developers to write plug-ins to extend the functionality of Apple's Mail.app. Add that on with the ability to write your own Applescripts to accomplish some tasks, and you have a pretty impressive repertoire."
Story

( Permalink: Mail.app Enhancements: Juice Up Your Email Client      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 19, 2004 )

How To Kill a Windows Network
"Wednesday afternoon I experimented for the first time with binding Panther Server to our Windows Active Directory. In the XServe's Directory Access app, I selected Active Directory, entered the domain and forest, computer ID, and it all just worked - I could see all of the users and groups on the domain from the Mac's Workgroup Manager. I was so impressed. Decided to wait for the next day to do more integration testing. Thursday morning I got an urgent call from the sysadmin that many of the Windows machines on our network were unable to log on because DC "mulder" was not responding, and that according to the System Events logs, the AD services seemed to have crashed exactly when I bound the Mac server to the domain."
Story

( Permalink: How To Kill a Windows Network      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 19, 2004 )

Siberian coal mine digs out FreeBSD funding
"Many donations were in the range of 10 to 100 euros, but some went further. The largest donor by far was Pittsburgh, US-based Web-hosting company Pair Networks, which according to Kamp donated $20,025 (£10,900). Another sizeable donation, for $1,000, came from Germany-based consultant Claudio Eichenberger of Working Solutions GmbH. ... Sergei Plaxienko, chief information officer at Belon, a Siberian coal-mining company with 7,000 employees, donated $1,203 to Kamp because, he said: "I know this guy, I know he is experienced and driven." (Pair is a great web hosting company. I would recommend them to anyone without any reservations. -- Noel)"
Story

( Permalink: Siberian coal mine digs out FreeBSD funding      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 19, 2004 )

Hacking BSD, Part 2
"In this age of GUIs and feature-rich browsers, it's easy to forget how quick and efficient command-line ftp can be. That is, until you're logged into a system that doesn't have X installed, nor a browser, nor any fancy FTP programs. If it's really your lucky day, it won't even have any manpages. And, of course, you'll need to download something. Perhaps you find yourself using ftp all the time, always going to the same FTP servers and downloading from or uploading to the same directories. Clearly, it's time for some FTP automation."
Story

( Permalink: Hacking BSD, Part 2      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 19, 2004 )

Building OpenSSH--Tools and Tradeoffs
"This article updates much of the information in "Building OpenSSH—Tools and Tradeoffs," Sun BluePrintsTM Online article, January 2003. This article contains information about gathering the needed components, deciding the compile-time configuration decisions, building the components, and finally assembling OpenSSH for the Solaris OS. Things change quickly in the open source world, so the versions mentioned in this article might have changed. Use the latest version, and test it in your environment. Despite version changes, the basic build process should remain the same."
Story

( Permalink: Building OpenSSH--Tools and Tradeoffs      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 19, 2004 )

Associative Array Usage in Python, Perl, and awk
"I have used Associative Arrays when parsing XML data, indexing documents, and any time I want to hash a key. Associative arrays can be very useful tools. In this column, I'll briefly look at the way three different scripting languages — Python, Perl and Awk — make use of associative arrays in their perceptive environments."
Story

( Permalink: Associative Array Usage in Python, Perl, and awk      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 19, 2004 )

Kommander Looks to Shake Up the Desktop
"Kommander is on its way to become one of the most compelling tools in KDE. It has elements that should be very interesting to application developers, power users, newbies and companies looking at using the Linux desktop. So the answer to the question many of you may be asking, "What is Kommander?", really has to be answered from each perspective. A simplified technical description is that Kommander is two programs, an editor and an executor, that produce dialogs that you can execute. "
Story

( Permalink: Kommander Looks to Shake Up the Desktop      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 19, 2004 )

A Secure Bioinformatics Linux Lab
"As now deployed, our Piscataway lab has 14 Red Hat Enterprise Linux workstations and two Enterprise Linux servers. In the Newark lab, (where the facility is smaller), we have four Red Hat Enterprise Linux workstations and one Enterprise Linux server. All Piscataway workstations are identical in terms of hardware, as are all Newark workstations; there are minor differences between the two sets, however."
Story

( Permalink: A Secure Bioinformatics Linux Lab      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 19, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Book Review: Debugging
(Sat Feb 28, 2004)

A First Look at the New GIMP 2.0
(Sat Feb 28, 2004)

The Future of Computing
(Sat Feb 28, 2004)

Port Knocking
(Fri Feb 27, 2004)

Linux 2.6 and Hyper-Threading
(Fri Feb 27, 2004)

Trusted Solaris
(Fri Feb 27, 2004)

Getting Reacquainted with dbXML 2.0
(Fri Feb 27, 2004)

ALT Linux Compact
(Fri Feb 27, 2004)

Home Automation with Mac OS X, Part 2
(Fri Feb 27, 2004)

Deep inside the K Desktop Environment 3.2
(Thu Feb 26, 2004)

Creating a PPP dialup server with OpenBSD
(Thu Feb 26, 2004)

Building Task Packages
(Thu Feb 26, 2004)

Novell is Becoming a True Linux Player
(Thu Feb 26, 2004)

A Security Primer for Mac OS X
(Thu Feb 26, 2004)

X Marks the Spot: Looking back at X11 Developments
(Thu Feb 26, 2004)

Apache-mod_ssl-PHP-Howto
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Ethernet Electric Razors
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Kernel Trouble
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Using the 2.6 Kernel with Your Current System
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Co-Founder Returns To Sun
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

The Trade Show Floor: The Invisible Demo
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Using MySQL from PHP
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) Study
(Wed Feb 25, 2004)

Linux on Dell Inspiron 8600
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

A Week with Slackware 9.1
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

Debunking Common GNU/Linux Myths
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

Configuring Web Logs in Apache
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

An Introduction to Wireless USB
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

SPARC Optimizations With GCC
(Tue Feb 24, 2004)

Dealing With the End Of Life Of Red Hat Linux
(Mon Feb 23, 2004)

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