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Desktop Linux: Sun Shines
"Desktop Linux is good enough to supplant Windows in a number of enterprise desktop roles, and it has been for some time now. However, major enterprise Linux vendors—most notably Red Hat Inc.—have been too busy until recently with server-room Linux to produce desktop products with the sort of management frameworks and stable product road maps that enterprises require. That changed with the release last month of two desktop Linux variants from major enterprise players: Sun Microsystems Inc.'s Java Desktop System 2 and Red Hat's Red Hat Desktop."
Story

( Permalink: Desktop Linux: Sun Shines      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 24, 2004 )

CLI for noobies: Hack the comment
"Ok, you GUI-potatoes, listen up. I'm not talking about hacking an RFC (Request for Comment) here. I'm talking about a program called Comment that you can run on your own system. Comment is a free software program released under the BSD license that lets you enter and recall notes from the command line in the blink of an eye -- or, if you type as slowly as I do, in several blinks. So grab a Jolt and get thyself to a console window, we've got some CLI to do."
Story

( Permalink: CLI for noobies: Hack the comment      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 24, 2004 )

Gnome 2.6 Review
"GNOME as it exists today is a mature and powerful platform for desktop applications on Linux. Because the developers have put so much emphasis on usability, anyone can quickly become comfortable with a desktop running GNOME. Large scale deployments in third world countries are a testament to this fact. The GNOME developers are hardly resting on their laurels, however. Work on GNOME 2.8 has already begun. Many new, exciting, and useful feature additions are planned. I am looking forward to increased use of SVG for graphics, as well as the inclusion of Evolution and Rhythmbox in the base desktop. Many other enhancements will be sure to come."
Story

( Permalink: Gnome 2.6 Review      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 24, 2004 )

Distributed method for C/C++ compilation
Given the nature of open source software, many Linux™ applications are distributed in a "tarball" containing source code that you must build before you can run the application. Larger applications can take several hours to build. This article shows how you can use the distributed C compiler, distcc, to speed up the compilation of these sources so you can start using them sooner.

( Permalink: Distributed method for C/C++ compilation      Submitted by Anonymous Thu Jun 24, 2004 )

Voice Recording Magic with the iPod
"You'd have to be buried under a heap of old Dells to have missed the iPod phenomenon. Its ample disc space, robust battery life, and seamless integration with your host computer have made it the digital music player of choice. What isn't as widely discussed is that this pocket jukebox is also a capable voice recorder. You can store hours of clean, 16-bit .wav files of just about any sound within reach of a microphone. All you have to do is add an inexpensive piece of hardware to a 3rd generation iPod, and you're in business. The recording software is already built into the iPod's operating system."
Story

( Permalink: Voice Recording Magic with the iPod      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 23, 2004 )

thebroken.org Crew: Robert Padbury
"If you've ever watched one of the hacking videos from thebroken.org, watched X-Play on Tech TV, or read the book "Lightwave Tips'N'Tricks, you've probably seen some of Robert Padbury's influence. On top of all that, he's a Machead, and agreed to talk with us for a bit. If you haven't seen the videos, you better check them out. Hopefully we'll be having interviews with other thebroken staff members, too!"
Story

( Permalink: thebroken.org Crew: Robert Padbury      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 23, 2004 )

64 Bit Linux – Just for Geeks?
"My focus is on Linux and the desktop versions that run on 64bit platforms such as AMD's Opteron and Intel's IA64 based processors. The 3 distros I'll be talking about are Fedora Core 2, Gentoo 2004.1, and Suse 9.1 Professional. While all are great packages they each leave much room for improvement with issues shared between them and things that are not so common. "
Story

( Permalink: 64 Bit Linux – Just for Geeks?      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 23, 2004 )

Secure Web Based Mail Services
There used to be a time when secure e-mail management was simple. "Managing" meant sorting through your e-mail messages and putting them into appropriate folders. Secure e-mail back then meant using a simple password for e-mail access. However, today, with e-mail being a business-critical application, more threats against e-mail than ever before, and government regulatory concerns, secure e-mail management takes on a whole different meaning. Viruses, spam, worms, and other malicious attacks and non-malicious events can bring e-mail infrastructures to their knees. eBCVG Network

( Permalink: Secure Web Based Mail Services      Submitted by MarekB Wed Jun 23, 2004 )

A Geeklog server on FreeBSD
"Geeklog is a popular and very flexible and secure weblog package written in PHP. While flexible, and going a long way towards a full content management system, Geeklog is also big, feature rich, and leaves some things to desire when it comes to performance. In this article I explain some of the things I did to optimize my FreeBSD/Apache2/PHP4 based Geeklog installation. "
Story

( Permalink: A Geeklog server on FreeBSD      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 23, 2004 )

getupdates
"Caught up in the tangle of manually installing and updating software, enterprises can find a tip or two in the open source community's book on how to streamline the process, according to Google Inc. senior system administrator Marc Merlin. Merlin's platform of choice is Debian GNU/Linux, which he said has the most comprehensive software library available for Linux. Merlin developed 'getupdates', a program to keep client software synchronized with a central server."
Story

( Permalink: getupdates      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 23, 2004 )

Book Review: Squid – The Definitive Guide
"Sounds simple, doesn’t it? But in reality things are not that simple. The cache of such a caching proxy server must be configured carefully to really bring performance gains. Web pages change with time; some change once a month, others once a day, and some pages change continuously, such as those generated dynamically by scripts. Thus, you must understand how to dimension the cache, how long to keep pages in the cache, and know which pages to cache or not to cache at all."
Story

( Permalink: Book Review: Squid – The Definitive Guide      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 23, 2004 )

Securing Apache 2: Step-by-Step
"Continuing the step-by-step fashion from the previous series (Securing Apache, Securing PHP, and Securing MySQL), this article shows how to install and configure Apache 2.0 to minimize the risk of unauthorized access or successful break-in, even if new security vulnerabilities in Apache web server are found. Thus, it will be possible to enjoy the new features of Apache 2.0 without worrying too much about its security bugs, regardless if they are only imaginary, or are in fact real and serious threats."
Story

( Permalink: Securing Apache 2: Step-by-Step      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 23, 2004 )

Roundabout Route to Photography
"When students ask Jeffrey Aaronson what it takes to break into professional digital photography, he says simply: "Get a Degree in Biochemistry and Clinical Pharmacology.” Then the veteran photojournalist — who has shot portraits for “Vanity Fair,” human rights issues for “Time” magazine and the “New York Times,” and cultural anthropology for the National Geographic Society and “Smithsonian” magazine — asks: “How does anyone every arrive at any point in life? There is no blueprint.“"
Story

( Permalink: Roundabout Route to Photography      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 22, 2004 )

Adium X
"Adium X is a multi-protocol IM client. It currently has support for AIM/ICQ, Gadu-Gadu, Jabber, MSN, Napster, Novell GroupWise, Trepia, and Yahoo/Yahoo Japan. It is capable of having multiple accounts connected at the same time, so all of your connections can be made in one program. The contact list has plenty of features and options, so you can make it look the way you want. "
Story

( Permalink: Adium X      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 22, 2004 )

Foremost: a Linux computer forensics tool
"Written by agents in the U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations, Foremost can read through files and file headers on PCs or copied PC hard disk images. The tool scans a drive or drive image for pre-defined file types or specific text strings, which are defined in a configuration file. Foremost can be used to recover entire files, or partial file fragments from a damaged disk as well as from deleted files on a hard drive. When the program finds files, it copies the file header and data to a file on the local Linux machine."
Story

( Permalink: Foremost: a Linux computer forensics tool      Submitted by Noel Tue Jun 22, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

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Biodiesel Resources

Older News

The Luxury of Ignorance: A Follow-Up
(Thu Mar 4, 2004)

Aaron Seigo
(Thu Mar 4, 2004)

Kernel 2.6 Rocks the Enterprise
(Thu Mar 4, 2004)

Give Linux Wireless Networking a Try
(Thu Mar 4, 2004)

Greylisting: Next Step in the Spam War
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

Network Protocol Stack & TCP Hacking
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

Solaris Zones for Isolated Virtual OS Instances
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

Transputers - a Look Back at a Great Microprocesso
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

A Global Survey of Linux Distributions
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

Signature Program for Email and News
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

SpamAssassin ClamAV Procmail Howto
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

Ares Desktop
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

Creating a CVS server using FreeBSD
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

The Money Bet: Solaris on Sparc
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

Installing a USB Flash Drive
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

Ten Lessons From a Goan Classroom
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

Review: Lycoris Desktop/LX Personal
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

Seting Up an IPv6 Masquerade/NAT Debian Box
(Mon Mar 1, 2004)

The Luxury of Ignorance
(Mon Mar 1, 2004)

NetBSD in 2003 - Annual NetBSD Status Report
(Mon Mar 1, 2004)

Backing up with Konserve
(Mon Mar 1, 2004)

Great Software for Your Sharp Zaurus
(Mon Mar 1, 2004)

Preventing a Cross-Site Scripting Attack
(Mon Mar 1, 2004)

Automating Unix and Linux Administration
(Sun Feb 29, 2004)

On the ALSA Track
(Sun Feb 29, 2004)

Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther
(Sun Feb 29, 2004)

Automounter Madness
(Sun Feb 29, 2004)

Centrino's Core: The Pentium M
(Sun Feb 29, 2004)

Client Side Optimization
(Sat Feb 28, 2004)

Unreal Tournament 2004 Demo
(Sat Feb 28, 2004)

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