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Semi-Pro Linux-Based Recording
"First, a cheer to the people who've been writing the code for these apps that make it possible for me to write an article like this. Make that plural -- cheers! Not so long ago, an article about making a semi-professional music studio with Linux would have seemed more optimism than reality. Not so now. It is still true that putting the components together for a music studio can be time-consuming, but this is true of any complex music-making program on any platform, not just Linux."
Story

( Permalink: Semi-Pro Linux-Based Recording      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 26, 2004 )

Review: PlanMaker for Linux
"Spreadsheet development has more or less solidified over the past year -- the majority of the features that most people need are already there in long-established proprietary programs like Excel and Lotus 123 -- and that means that the door is open for smaller companies and free software projects to grab market share with capable, inexpensive products. That's probably the best way to describe SoftMaker's $49.95 PlanMaker 2004 for Linux, which was released earlier this month: capable, inexpensive, cross-platform competition for Microsoft Excel 2003. You won't find a more Excel-compatible spreadsheet on any operating system, but Microsoft compatibility is far from PlanMaker's only worthwhile feature."
Story

( Permalink: Review: PlanMaker for Linux      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 26, 2004 )

Interview with Gavriel State (Transgaming)
"I founded TransGaming in Mid-2000, after having led the Corel Linux Applications development team. Given the growth in the popularity of Linux and the lack of available games, I felt that starting a company that focused on bringing the latest triple-A games to the platform was a winning combination. Traditionally, games have driven the adoption of new platforms and operating systems. The development of DirectX was a major factor in the adoption of Microsoft's Windows 95 among PC users. We believe that increasing the availability of games is one of the most crucial factors required to increase adoption of Linux on the desktop. "
Story

( Permalink: Interview with Gavriel State (Transgaming)      Submitted by Noel Sat Jun 26, 2004 )

Making RSS Pretty
"Normally when you view an RSS file in a browser, you just get an XML parse-tree diagram, which is very inscrutible and un-informative to casual users. I've come up with a few ways to improve this situation. None of these affect how the RSS actually looks in an RSS reader/aggregator. My ideas here are neither original nor earthshattering, but I figure it might be interesting/useful for somebody on the list here, so I'm rounding them up for your amusement:"
Story

( Permalink: Making RSS Pretty      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 25, 2004 )

eGenesis proves Linux users will buy games
"About a year and a half ago the tiny independent game developer eGenesis decided to create a Linux port of its massively multiplayer online game, A Tale In The Desert. The game was designed to appeal to creative people looking for an alternative to games that focused on destruction. The company's initial thinking was that it might get a few incremental sales and garner goodwill with the community by supporting Linux. What eGenesis discovered was that, per user, Linux gamers were and continue to be their best customers. Each account, on average, has generated twice as much revenue as those of Windows gamers. "
Story

( Permalink: eGenesis proves Linux users will buy games      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 25, 2004 )

What About E-mail Security?
"One mode of communicating over the Internet, however, is done shockingly, overwhelmingly in the clear. I'm talking about e-mail. It doesn't have to be this way, though. With all the excitement about SPF and other mail authentication methods, it struck me that people haven't done even the base work to secure their communications--myself included. If one can eavesdrop on communications, one can spoof those communications. In my mind, authentication schemes are going to be of dubious value without an attendant amount of effort spent securing the line as well."
Story

( Permalink: What About E-mail Security?      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 25, 2004 )

Bluetooth and YOU
Bluetooth: yet another technology buzzword, but what is Bluetooth and how can it benefit you? One thing is certain, you probably didn't know it was named after a Danish king. In Part One of Bluetooth and YOU we introduce you to this exciting standard and give you a glimpse of how you and your Mac can benefit from Bluetooth.
Story

( Permalink: Bluetooth and YOU      Submitted by Tom Robinson Fri Jun 25, 2004 )

Apple Remote Desktop 2 speeds up, adds 50 features
"The new release of Apple Remote Desktop can produce hardware and software inventory reports and lets administrators to install software or schedule it for later installation. Admins can use more than 200 system information attributes to keep track of systems in their domain, and they can see what's going on with individual desktops by using real-time screen sharing. Screen sharing works on Macs, as well as Windows and Linux computers using Virtual Network Computing (VNC)."
Story

( Permalink: Apple Remote Desktop 2 speeds up, adds 50 features      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 25, 2004 )

Linux DVD Howto
A short howto on playing DVDs on Linux.

( Permalink: Linux DVD Howto      Submitted by someone Fri Jun 25, 2004 )

HOW-TO Tuesday: War Kayaking
"As the summer approaches, we crawl out of our protective wired covered lairs to sometimes partake in outdoor activity. Last weekend, we went kayaking around Lake Union in Seattle, WA and of course, we couldn’t help but bring along a lot of equipment and decided we’d hunt for open wireless spots, this friends- was “War Kayaking” we found a ton, charted it with GPS, Wifi finders and we’ll show you how we did it for this week’s HOW-TO Tuesday."
Story

( Permalink: HOW-TO Tuesday: War Kayaking      Submitted by Noel Fri Jun 25, 2004 )

A High-Resolution wall display built on Java
The BlueSpace wall display is an exciting demonstration of the potential of multimedia development on the Java platform. A large-scale, high-resolution visual screen is implemented as a grid of projected computer displays. The resulting display is infinitely malleable in size and form and has numerous multimedia and presentation capabilities.

( Permalink: A High-Resolution wall display built on Java      Submitted by Anonymous Fri Jun 25, 2004 )

Apple sells supercomputer sequel
"The Macintosh software and the nice management features of OS X are factors here, but certainly performance of the processor is an enormous factor," Haff said. "PowerPC is a fast processor." Indeed, the chip's abilities to perform a type of mathematical calculation called "floating-point operations" were compelling. "The floating-point units in that processor were particularly attractive," Whitlock said."
Story

( Permalink: Apple sells supercomputer sequel      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 24, 2004 )

Secure your Mac
"OS X is a pretty secure operating system right out of the box. However, it has two major shortcomings. The first flaw is that by default the machine automatically logs in as an administrator. This means that even if you have your screen saver password protected, somebody could reboot your machine and gain full access. To fix this problem, open up System Preferences, click on the Security pane, and turn off automatic login."
Story

( Permalink: Secure your Mac      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 24, 2004 )

MAC address spoofing on FreeBSD using netgraph
"There is another solution. This article explains how to spoof a MAC address using FreeBSD. This is commonly known as "MAC cloning", and is offered as a feature on some commercial routers and wireless access points. The Netgraph system, an in-kernel networking subsystem built into FreeBSD, provides all the required tools to properly spoof MAC addresses. The attached code will work on a FreeBSD 5.2.1-RELEASE system "out of the box" and has only been successfully tested with FreeBSD 5.2.1-RELEASE."
Story

( Permalink: MAC address spoofing on FreeBSD using netgraph      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 24, 2004 )

Deep inside the K Desktop Environment 3.2
"While this overview has become a monster already, we are still afraid that we missed some interesting parts about the KDE project. The somewhat subtle, but nevertheless massive progress the project made between KDE version 3.1 and 3.2 shows that the foundation for both the development and the community is growing yet stable, while the community as a whole is still very eager for even more improvements. And improvements are certainly needed at many places. Initially, the primary focus during development on KDE has been the building and improving of infrastructure, while the input about usability issues in specific cases either simply did not exist or had been ignored. This has changed over the years due to the maturity of the foundation, which now enables many developers to pay attention to usability depending on specific use cases as well. "
Story

( Permalink: Deep inside the K Desktop Environment 3.2      Submitted by Noel Thu Jun 24, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

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Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Survey of YaST2 Configurator on SuSE 9.0
(Sun Mar 7, 2004)

Sharp Zaurus SL-5600
(Sun Mar 7, 2004)

Three Years of TransGaming
(Sat Mar 6, 2004)

Mandrake 10 RC and My Laptop
(Sat Mar 6, 2004)

Zabbix - A Free Monitoring Tool
(Sat Mar 6, 2004)

Kernel 2.6: Linux More Enterprise-Ready Than Ever
(Sat Mar 6, 2004)

Fly Your Linux Box by Gyromouse
(Sat Mar 6, 2004)

A Short Education for Users of OSS
(Fri Mar 5, 2004)

The Trouble With E-Voting
(Fri Mar 5, 2004)

Announcing the KDE Quality Team
(Fri Mar 5, 2004)

Roku Labs HD1000 Digital Media Player SDK
(Fri Mar 5, 2004)

Why Linux? Why Debian?
(Fri Mar 5, 2004)

OpenMusic and SuperCollider3
(Fri Mar 5, 2004)

Guide to using the GNU Privacy Guard
(Thu Mar 4, 2004)

Fighting Spam With Qmail
(Thu Mar 4, 2004)

The Luxury of Ignorance: A Follow-Up
(Thu Mar 4, 2004)

Aaron Seigo
(Thu Mar 4, 2004)

Kernel 2.6 Rocks the Enterprise
(Thu Mar 4, 2004)

Give Linux Wireless Networking a Try
(Thu Mar 4, 2004)

Greylisting: Next Step in the Spam War
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

Network Protocol Stack & TCP Hacking
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

Solaris Zones for Isolated Virtual OS Instances
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

Transputers - a Look Back at a Great Microprocesso
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

A Global Survey of Linux Distributions
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

Signature Program for Email and News
(Wed Mar 3, 2004)

SpamAssassin ClamAV Procmail Howto
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

Ares Desktop
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

Creating a CVS server using FreeBSD
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

The Money Bet: Solaris on Sparc
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

Installing a USB Flash Drive
(Tue Mar 2, 2004)

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Copyright 1999-2005 Noel Davis. Noel also runs web sites about sailing and kayaking.
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