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How To Do Everything With Mac OS X Panther
"Kirk McElhearn, of Macworld and TidBITS fame, has written a reasonable beginner's level book about Mac OS X Panther. What is unreasonable about the book is that awful 'Everything' word. Ignore it, because it ain't gonna happen here. What you will find is a collection of very readable, concise and efficient chapters covering most of Panther's features. This book also features a great idea, known as 'Voices From The Community', including an 8 page section on writers and how they use their Macs. For the reader who wants everything, this is a slim and spotty book. But if you are an average Mac user who is new to Panther, this book is very helpful. Any reader who wants hand holding should consider Robin William's Mac OS X Book, Panther Edition, and pay the extra $5. "
Story

( Permalink: How To Do Everything With Mac OS X Panther      Submitted by Noel Thu Jul 1, 2004 )

The keys to GnuPG
"GnuPG uses two keys: a public key for encrypting data, and a private (secret) key for decrypting it. Anyone who has a copy of your public key can use it to encrypt data that only you can read. Nobody can read your mail -- at least not very easily -- with your public key; your private key is required for that. We'll get started by generating a key-pair. The command to do so is: gpg --gen-key"
Story

( Permalink: The keys to GnuPG      Submitted by Noel Thu Jul 1, 2004 )

gLabels: Ready for prime time
"gLables, a GNOME program that makes and prints all sorts of labels and business cards, seems to be capable of handling just about any task you throw at it. It's at release 1.93.3, a developer release on the way to a stable 2.0 version, but it's in very good shape. With gLabels, the label design process is simplicity itself. You begin by picking a template that defines the size and shape of a label. I counted 232 predefined templates for everything from name tags to drawer labels to mailing labels to business cards to CD cover labels. Almost all of those were based on standard Avery forms, but there were a few oddballs too."
Story

( Permalink: gLabels: Ready for prime time      Submitted by Noel Thu Jul 1, 2004 )

CERT recommends anything but IE
"A statement on the CERT site said: "There are a number of significant vulnerabilities in technologies relating to the IE domain/zone security model, the DHTML object model, MIME type determination, and ActiveX. It is possible to reduce exposure to these vulnerabilities by using a different web browser, especially when browsing untrusted sites." CERT otherwise recommends users to set security settings to high and disable JavaScript"
Story

( Permalink: CERT recommends anything but IE      Submitted by Noel Thu Jul 1, 2004 )

Fighting Network threats with a Network Analyzer
This article shows how a network analyzer, historically used for network troubleshooting, can also be used to defend against the security threats. Certain features of a network analyzer can be set to monitor for virus and attack signatures and offer quick ways of isolating infected systems. For those organizations that are looking to invest in a network analyzer there are certain key features that should be considered. eBCVG

( Permalink: Fighting Network threats with a Network Analyzer      Submitted by MarekB Thu Jul 1, 2004 )

Stretch Java skills with CodeRuler medieval game
Guard your castle! Claim your land! Command your knights to joust valiantly and defeat their foes. Capture the enemy's position and seize its land while dodging its menacing knights. If writing mundane Java code is giving you the blues lately, maybe it's time to turn your medieval fantasies into reality with CodeRuler. You can rule your own kingdom while refining your Java programming skills and mastering the Eclipse development environment all at the same time. This article provides you with the Jave tips needed to let you achieve ultimate CodeRuler kingdom domination.

( Permalink: Stretch Java skills with CodeRuler medieval game      Submitted by Anonymous Thu Jul 1, 2004 )

Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager
Virtual memory is one of the most important subsystems of any modern operating system. Because of this "Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager" is a great guide in better understanding and working with the entire kernel. Read the book review here.

( Permalink: Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager      Submitted by Anonymous Thu Jul 1, 2004 )

Mac OS X Server client management
"Generally speaking, users are distinct enough that you can create a single managed group for them. As an example, eighth-grade students, middle school teachers, graphic designers, administrative assistants -- all are pretty distinct groups in terms of what they need and how they work. Remember, even if you limit users to a single group, you can still make them members of additional nonmanaged groups for setting permissions and access to network resources."
Story

( Permalink: Mac OS X Server client management      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 30, 2004 )

Passwords in Swap files
"At first, this 'vulnerability' may not seem like such a big deal. After all, the swap files are only readable by root. However, a system administrator should not have it so easy if he or she would want to obtain user passwords. Passwords should never be stored in clear text _anywhere_. A malicious trojan with root privileges can now steal user password in clear text, and many users use same passwords for other accounts, so this is a big deal. In addition, Keychain passwords are also apparently stored in clear text within the swap files (I haven't tested this). I hope Apple fixes this soon!"
Story

( Permalink: Passwords in Swap files      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 30, 2004 )

Kernel DoS Vulnerability
In this weeks Security Alerts, we look at problems in the Linux kernel, www-sql, super, rssh, Horde-IMP, GNU GNATS, gzip, ISC DHCP, and sup.

( Permalink: Kernel DoS Vulnerability      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 30, 2004 )

What To Do When Things Go Wrong
"Using the FreeBSD ports collection is generally an exercise in knowing what command to type and when. Again, trained monkey work. The secret to using the ports collection well is knowing what to do when the output of the ports collection isn't exactly what you expected. While the general design and implementation of the ports collection helps to minimize the risk of errors, the involvement of humans, magnetic media, long distances, solar radiation, and pure, dumb luck all conspire to assure that mistakes and errors will occasionally be made by both people and processes."
Story

( Permalink: What To Do When Things Go Wrong      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 30, 2004 )

Security: The root of the problem
"It doesn't seem that a day goes by without someone announcing a critical flaw in some crucial piece of software or other. Is software that bad? Are programmers so inept? What the heck is going on, and why is the problem getting worse instead of better? One distressing aspect of software security is that we fundamentally don't seem to "get it." In the 15 years I've been working the security beat, I have lost track of the number of times I've seen (and taught) tutorials on "how to write secure code" or read books on that topic. It's clear to me that we're:
Trying to teach programmers how to write more secure code
Failing miserably at the task"

Story

( Permalink: Security: The root of the problem      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 30, 2004 )

Five Performance Tools for Linux on PowerPC
This article describes Performance Inspector, which contains a suite of performance tools for Linux. The author describes how to download and install the required software and tools, and how to collect performance data. She also provides details on how to use the five basic tools, which you can use to analyze performance of your C/C++ and Java applications, as well as performance of your system as a whole.

( Permalink: Five Performance Tools for Linux on PowerPC      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Jun 30, 2004 )

Automating Builds on Linux
"An automated nightly build is a process for building an application every night using an infrastructure that automatically executes the required steps at the scheduled time, without any human intervention. A well-planned build process not only builds your application, but also provides you and your team with early detection of incompatible changes in the application components and early detection of errors introduced by newly integrated code. When configured and used properly, automated builds are a critical component for ensuring that the application satisfies quality requirements and continues to run as expected."
Story

( Permalink: Automating Builds on Linux      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 30, 2004 )

Hidden costs of offshoring
"Any cost we saved on salary, we gave away -- and then some," said Griffiths. By his estimate, it took 20 contractors to do the work of 10 in the U.S. To make matters worse, within three months after training was complete, many of the contractors left, taking advantage of their own employer's policy which allows them to transfer after nine months on a project."
Story

( Permalink: Hidden costs of offshoring      Submitted by Noel Wed Jun 30, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Inside TLDP
(Sun Mar 14, 2004)

D. Jeff Dionne of Arcturus
(Sun Mar 14, 2004)

Panther: A Look at Mac on Its 20th Birthday
(Sun Mar 14, 2004)

Mandrake Linux 10 Community Edition
(Sun Mar 14, 2004)

Use AOP to maintain legacy Java applications
(Sun Mar 14, 2004)

Open Source OS
(Sun Mar 14, 2004)

Unreal Tournament 2004 Demo for Linux Review
(Sat Mar 13, 2004)

Gumstix Computer Exposed (with pictures)
(Sat Mar 13, 2004)

LinuxCertified LC2430 laptop
(Sat Mar 13, 2004)

Googling Up Passwords
(Sat Mar 13, 2004)

Use AOP to maintain legacy Java applications
(Sat Mar 13, 2004)

TransGaming and the Community
(Sat Mar 13, 2004)

Onebase, a very interesting Linux Distribution
(Fri Mar 12, 2004)

The Open Road: ccache
(Fri Mar 12, 2004)

Spidering Hacks
(Fri Mar 12, 2004)

Eric Laffoon, keeper of Quanta
(Fri Mar 12, 2004)

Secure Software: Oxymoron?
(Fri Mar 12, 2004)

Server Side Modifications
(Fri Mar 12, 2004)

Adventures in Kernel Compilation 2.6.3
(Thu Mar 11, 2004)

VMware Workstation 4.0.5
(Thu Mar 11, 2004)

ASK Me No Questions, I'll Tell You No Lies
(Thu Mar 11, 2004)

The Journey from Poacher to Gamekeeper
(Thu Mar 11, 2004)

Build a phpBB Forum in 5 Steps
(Thu Mar 11, 2004)

Solaris 64-bit Developer's Guide
(Thu Mar 11, 2004)

A Preview of GNOME 2.6
(Wed Mar 10, 2004)

New Nmap
(Wed Mar 10, 2004)

A peek at script kiddie culture
(Wed Mar 10, 2004)

Introduction to the Gumstix tiny linux computer
(Wed Mar 10, 2004)

On The Fly: Boot Knoppix Linux, Keep Windows
(Wed Mar 10, 2004)

SCO Vs AutoZone - If it were hardware...
(Wed Mar 10, 2004)

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