# RootPrompt.org   Nothing but Unix.[Home] [Features] [Programming] [Mac OS X] [Search]

Review of Libranet 2.8.1
"Platypus finally got his hands on a free copy of Libranet-2.8.1 and he got to test it over the weekend. Personally platypus has always wanted to find out what all the fuss was about the revered Adminmenu tool that comes bundled with libranet. All the reviewers before him of libranet seem to be happy with the tool and sang acodales for it. With libranet releasing a free trial of their 2.8.1 release, I finally got my chance to find out."
Story

( Permalink: Review of Libranet 2.8.1      Submitted by Noel Wed Jul 7, 2004 )

CLI for noobies: Midnight Commander
"With the vast power of the GNU/Linux command line comes an equal amount of complexity. Trying to remember the multitude of commands can be overwhelming at times. As you sit staring at the blackness of your monitor, you wish for an easier way to tame this thing called CLI. Relax all of you GUI addicts, it is now time to introduce you to the wonderful world of Midnight Commander. Midnight Commander (MC) is a clone of a DOS utility called Norton Commander and belongs to a large family of console based file managers known simply as Commanders, or Orthodox File Managers."
Story

( Permalink: CLI for noobies: Midnight Commander      Submitted by Noel Wed Jul 7, 2004 )

MEPIS 2004.b05
"MEPIS has a very strong community support base as well as official support. There is an excellent forum at the official web site MEPIS.org. There are several unofficial forums such as Mepis Forum. It is no wonder that this distro has developed a strong, passionate, and rapidly growing following. I have found myself doing more and more in MEPIS than any of the other OSs I have installed, including Xandros 2. There is nothing I can say about MEPIS that doesn't sound like a cliche!!"
Story

( Permalink: MEPIS 2004.b05      Submitted by Noel Wed Jul 7, 2004 )

The Foolish Things We Do With Our Computers
"Steve", she said in tremulous tone, "you had better sit down." "Why, what's up? Is the dog dead?" "No", she said, "he may not have long to live though - he's chewed your computer!". I charged in to the dining room where I kept my box, (it's an upgrade - I used to have to sit in the cupboard under the stairs), and my jaw hit the floor. Picture the scene if you will - one keyboard, all the keys removed, partially chewed and placed in a neat pile next to the body (less cord) of the mouse. Printer and modem power supplies, less leads, in a pile next to that. Every single wire, apart from the monitor lead, had been removed from the box and had the connectors/plugs chewed off and discarded."
Story

( Permalink: The Foolish Things We Do With Our Computers      Submitted by Noel Wed Jul 7, 2004 )

Rendezvous with the Desktop
"This week, Apple brought Rendezvous back to the forefront with updated libraries for POSIX systems, as well as support for Java. Unfortunately, despite the fact that these libraries are out there for distributions and developers to use, few in the Free Software community have taken the time to adopt Zeroconf technology (Mandrakesoft's Mandrakelinux being the sole exception that I am aware of). It is time for this to change. "
Story

( Permalink: Rendezvous with the Desktop      Submitted by Noel Wed Jul 7, 2004 )

Surviving Distributed Denial of Service Attacks
Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks aim to disrupt the service of information systems by overwhelming the processing capacity of systems or by flooding the network bandwidth of the targeted business. Recently, these attacks have been used to deny service to commercial web sites that rely on a constant Internet presence for their business. The attacks differ from traditional DDoS attacks in the targeted nature and shear number of attacking hosts. eBCVG Network

( Permalink: Surviving Distributed Denial of Service Attacks      Submitted by MarekB Wed Jul 7, 2004 )

Getting in on the Free OS
"Each of these distributors offer downloadable versions of Linux from their web sites, but beware, installation can be difficult for the uninitiated. It is also worth noting that Yellow Dog seems to have an edge on hardware compatibility with recent Mac models. In fact, you can order a new Mac at Apple's retail price with Yellow Dog Linux preinstalled and supported. A great option for those of us that are weak at the command line. (btw, I don't work for Yellow Dog)"
Story

( Permalink: Getting in on the Free OS      Submitted by Noel Tue Jul 6, 2004 )

Searching for the Perfect OS 
"We all have a million file folders and you can't find anything," Jobs said during his keynote speech introducing Tiger, the next iteration of Mac OS X, due next year. "It's easier to find something from among a billion Web pages with Google than it is to find something on your hard disk," he added."
Story

( Permalink: Searching for the Perfect OS       Submitted by Noel Tue Jul 6, 2004 )

The State of KOffice 1.3
"The KDE Office Suite consists of a word-processor (KWord), spreadsheet (KSpread), presentation tool (KPresenter), vector graphics (Karbon14), flow charting (Kivio) and report generation (Kugar). Supporting tools include KChart for graphing, KFormula for mathmatical equations and KTheasurus to provide theasurus functionality. The database application, Kexi, is under heavy development and will be reviewed seperately once it nears release. I didn't have time to include Kugar in this review. Other components, project management (KPlato) and image manipulation (Krita) are not ready for everyday use yet although Krita is showing signs of reawkening."
Story

( Permalink: The State of KOffice 1.3      Submitted by Noel Tue Jul 6, 2004 )

Front and Back: KPGP and GPG
"KGPG is a front-end to GPG, the GNU Privacy Guard. GPG was created to replace PGP, the popular encryption program. GPG is a common component in a Linux system - almost all package utilities use it for verification, for example. GPG is an implementation of OpenPGP (RFC 2440), a standard created around the workings of PGP, to provide security for, among other things, e-mail. PGP/GPG is best known as an implementation of public-key cryptography - each user has two keys, a public key, and a private key. If I want to send encrypted e-mail to Mark, I encrypt it using my private key and his public key; Mark is then able to decrypt it using his private key and my public key."
Story

( Permalink: Front and Back: KPGP and GPG      Submitted by Noel Tue Jul 6, 2004 )

Mandrake 10.0
"I'm going to have to say that I'd recommend Mandrake 10 for new users emphatically, vehemently, and possibly at sword-point. But if you're thinking about upgrading from 9.2, think twice. Take a look at what Mandrake 10 has to offer and what you actually *need* from it. You might want to wait for 10.1 before upgrading."
Story

( Permalink: Mandrake 10.0      Submitted by Noel Tue Jul 6, 2004 )

Investigating Firebird with Helen Borrie
"Can you provide an overview of Firebird and its goals?
Firebird has always been open source; it's a fork of a mature commercial database called InterBase. InterBase is an enterprise-level database -- Firebird is the same, but better. You'll find Firebird behind a number of Websites, storing records for telcos, and managing data for point-of-sale systems -- just about anywhere you might find Oracle or SQL Server. The project goal is to replace Oracle and SQL Server in commercial applications."

Story

( Permalink: Investigating Firebird with Helen Borrie      Submitted by Noel Tue Jul 6, 2004 )

Defend I.T.: Security by Example - Book Review
With the recent surge of interest in the IT/IS field, we are seeing many newcomers(myself included). This is resulting in many new books each year. This one is actually one of the more interesting ones I've read lately. It uses case studies to really grab your attention, and then it explains what it's attempting to show you in the study, and how. If you enjoy reading security books, then you'll probably enjoy this one. eBCVG

( Permalink: Defend I.T.: Security by Example - Book Review      Submitted by Danny Tue Jul 6, 2004 )

Linux and Apple
"What is important here is Chute and his team 1) looked exclusively at Apple and Linux, both important players in open source, and 2) completely ignored Microsoft in the equation (not a shock in the scientific sector due to licensing issues) and 3) did not find any flaw in Linux itself, just that the interface for management was not quite there. This to me is a second ringing endorsement for open source and shows that the largest obstacle will be simpifying the client and server interface to the powerful underlying Linux engine."
Story

( Permalink: Linux and Apple      Submitted by Noel Mon Jul 5, 2004 )

Summer Photo Fun
"You may remember a few years ago seeing pictures made up of thousands of little pictures were all the rage, often sold under the trade name Photomosaic. These clever montages were developed by a student at MIT’s Media Lab. Wouldn’t it be great if you could create your own photo montage of your favorite vacation picture, made up of your other vacation pictures? Well, now you can by using Frank M. Midgeley’s MacOSaiX."
Story

( Permalink: Summer Photo Fun      Submitted by Noel Mon Jul 5, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Bruce Perens on UserLinux
(Mon Mar 22, 2004)

Sun Blade 1500
(Mon Mar 22, 2004)

Data Reduction
(Sun Mar 21, 2004)

OS Review: NetBSD 1.6.2 on SPARC64
(Sun Mar 21, 2004)

Interview with Matthew Dillon of DragonFly BSD
(Sun Mar 21, 2004)

A Field Guide To Wireless LANs
(Sun Mar 21, 2004)

Your LDAP administration toolbox
(Sun Mar 21, 2004)

An Advanced File System for Linux
(Sat Mar 20, 2004)

An Interview with OpenBSD's Marc Espie
(Sat Mar 20, 2004)

Benchmarking With FreeBSD
(Sat Mar 20, 2004)

Some Reasons Why Ronny prefers Gnome over KDE
(Sat Mar 20, 2004)

Tackling Unix security in large organisations
(Sat Mar 20, 2004)

Learning Functional Programming through Multimedia
(Sat Mar 20, 2004)

Cooking with sendmail
(Fri Mar 19, 2004)

My Linux Desktop Odyssey, 2004
(Fri Mar 19, 2004)

questions to get you started in PERL
(Fri Mar 19, 2004)

Interview with Zack Rusin
(Fri Mar 19, 2004)

Mandrake 10 - An outstanding effort
(Fri Mar 19, 2004)

Tips and tricks for using ImageMagick on Linux
(Fri Mar 19, 2004)

Netbooting NetBSD 1.6.2 on an i386 laptop.
(Thu Mar 18, 2004)

How Google Grows...and Grows...and Grows
(Thu Mar 18, 2004)

How to prolong lithium-based batteries
(Thu Mar 18, 2004)

Fedora Core 2 Shows 2.6 Kernel's Stuff
(Thu Mar 18, 2004)

Crunch Numbers with GT3 using a Quadratic Sieve
(Thu Mar 18, 2004)

Developer Accused Of Pirating Version Of Linux
(Thu Mar 18, 2004)

Mac OS X 10.3.3 Update
(Wed Mar 17, 2004)

Chkrootkit Portsentry Howto
(Wed Mar 17, 2004)

Creating secure backups with GnuPG
(Wed Mar 17, 2004)

What's Wrong with Eclipse Plugins
(Wed Mar 17, 2004)

Homemade Embedded BSD Systems
(Wed Mar 17, 2004)

[Latest News] [Newer News] [Older News]

Our content can be syndicated: Main Page Mac Page
(Validate RSS code)

Copyright 1999-2005 Noel Davis. Noel also runs web sites about sailing and kayaking.
All trademarks are the property of their owners.
All articles are owned by their author