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InstallShield X and Linux
"It just becomes another way of deploying software, and the secret isn't so much in the package it's how you get to create that package and the quality and consistency of the creation process. So we see RPM and other native delivery mechanisms as just the payload. The secret sauce is in creating that payload, and creating all the logic and dependencies and exception checking around it, to make sure that it does exactly what you want to do. I guess to summarize a short answer to what was pretty pointed question, we've already been fighting a battle for a couple of years getting over our market perception as a Windows-only tool and we've been fighting that battle by consistently releasing good products over time, and I think we're starting to see the payoff from that investment with InstallShield X."
Story

( Permalink: InstallShield X and Linux      Submitted by Noel Wed Jul 14, 2004 )

The Epson CX5400 All-in-one printer and SUSE
"It was a simple twist of fate: my HP Scanjet 5200C scanner gave up the ghost at the same time my HP Deskjet 842C ink cartridges went dry. I set off to do some comparison shopping for new cartridges at Office Depot and Best Buy. I decided to check the prices on new scanners as well. Instead of coming home with the best deal on the cartridges, and pricing info on scanners, I came back with an Epson Stylus CX5400. It's a multi-function device that replaces both the HP scanner and the printer, and gives me a standalone personal copier as well. Here's my rationale for getting the Epson CX5400, and the story on how I got it to play nicely on my SUSE 9.1 desktop."
Story

( Permalink: The Epson CX5400 All-in-one printer and SUSE      Submitted by Noel Wed Jul 14, 2004 )

Three Topics on the Future of Outlining
"Winer and his programmers took a more sophisticated tack: they used the C and Pascal languages as models, creating something code-named Juicy, which became UserTalk. Programmers, including the amazing Doug Baron (also mentioned below), wrote the Frontier environment for UserTalk, which we’ll talk about in a minute. This was code-named Caboodle. Baron wrote an extensible platform that could reach anywhere on the Mac. Winer—and later many of the Frontier users—enriched the platform through UserTalk routines and scripts."
Story

( Permalink: Three Topics on the Future of Outlining      Submitted by Noel Tue Jul 13, 2004 )

 Whither USENIX?
"This leads to the more general question: how do we keep the "practical bias" in academic systems research? Before I try to answer that directly, it's worth looking at the way research is conducted by other engineering disciplines. (After all, one of the things that separates systems from the rest of computer science is its relative proximity to engineering.) To me, it's very interesting to look at the history of mechanical engineering at MIT. In particular, note the programs that no longer exist:"
Story

( Permalink:  Whither USENIX?      Submitted by Noel Tue Jul 13, 2004 )

OpenBSD - For Your Eyes Only
"Given this admirable record, why doesn't everybody immediately run out and install OpenBSD? After all, you can hardly beat the price (free download). Unfortunately, though OpenBSD is free, it does come with a cost. Running an ultra-secure operating system can be a bit of work, and OpenBSD doesn't expend much effort at being user-friendly. In other words, don't expect a point-and-click paradise - OpenBSD will exercise your Unix geek skills more than the typical Linux distro. Indeed, even FreeBSD (which is decidedly not for wimps) strives to be much less user-hostile. That having been said, if you've gained some experience at Unix-style system administration, OpenBSD is definitely worth a look."
Story

( Permalink: OpenBSD - For Your Eyes Only      Submitted by Noel Tue Jul 13, 2004 )

How to migrate your company to Linux clusters
"Anyone following the high performance computing industry has probably noticed the growing popularity of Linux cluster systems. The 23rd Top 500 list, a ranking of the world's most powerful supercomputers, reported that clusters make up more than 50 percent of the list. The appeal is easy to understand; Linux clusters are a fraction of the cost of traditional supercomputers while providing blazingly fast performance numbers. Many organizations from national labs to Hollywood special effects shops have reported performance increases that their previous systems couldn't touch. With such widespread appeal and tangible benefits, the migration to cluster systems seems inevitable for many organizations."
Story

( Permalink: How to migrate your company to Linux clusters      Submitted by Noel Tue Jul 13, 2004 )

Apple 15-inch PowerBook G4
"If you're looking for a new Mac laptop, the 15-inch PowerBook G4 hits the sweet spot in trading off features for size and weight. It's a true desktop replacement machine with every possible expansion port that weighs less than six pounds. Wi-Fi (802.11g), Bluetooth, Gigabit Ethernet and a 56K modem are all built-in, making networking a snap. And the CD-RW/DVD-R SuperDrive, 80GB hard drive, and 1.5GHz processor add up to one powerful machine. We also love the many video output options, and the bright, widescreen LCD that makes DVD viewing a pleasure on long plane trips. Just be sure to bring an extra battery, since this machine is a power eater."
Story

( Permalink: Apple 15-inch PowerBook G4      Submitted by Noel Mon Jul 12, 2004 )

How I Invented Linux
Ask anyone that follows technology and operating system currents events who created Linux and Inevitably they would say Linus Torvalds, but if you've read the headlines as of late, there is supposedly reason to believe that Linus was not the true creator.

It started with one or two "real" original developers, then a handful of others and then finally there was a whole herd of 'em. Well you can chalk one more up on the list. osOpinion/osViews editorial contributor, Preston St. Pierre says he's the real, official, promise and hope to die, honest to goodness, true to life original Linux creator.

( Permalink: How I Invented Linux      Submitted by Kelly McNeill Mon Jul 12, 2004 )

Cedega Review: Play Games on Linux
"Nowadays, the -only- game installed on the XP partition is City of Heroes. I have some games in Linux, but mostly first person shooters (thanks iD and Epic). The XP install is a bare, firewalled install with a City of Heroes icon in the center of the desktop. It's basically an impossibility to do anything long term (torrents, other downloads, maintain conversations via AIM, IRC, play music) if I want to play this (incredibly addicting) game. So I reboot, then reboot back. I'm sure many of you Linux gamers out there feel my pain. Plus, I run a dual monitor setup, so it'd be nice if I could have CoH running on one monitor and a slew of other (Linux) apps on the other. Unfortunately, City of Heroes only runs in Windows. Then I saw the announcement of Cedega, and the support for City of Heroes. "
Story

( Permalink: Cedega Review: Play Games on Linux      Submitted by Noel Mon Jul 12, 2004 )

Multi-Layer Intrusion Detection Systems
"More often than not, single security solutions merely scratch the surface of an entire security event. This surface of information can be equated to the crust of the earth, which only makes up barely one percent of the earth's total mass. Analyzing just this small surface area of event information is not a sustainable approach to protecting networks. One must dig deeper, into the mantle, and even further into the core in order to truly begin to monitor and understand security events within computer systems and networks. It is the mIDS technology which allows analysts to dig beyond the crust, and into the mantle, giving you, the analyst, a significantly better situational awareness and understanding. "
Story

( Permalink: Multi-Layer Intrusion Detection Systems      Submitted by Noel Mon Jul 12, 2004 )

RADEON Enabler adds functionality
"RADEON Enabler is a patch that allows ATI's Displays application to recognize most OEM (AGP cards) and onboard graphics solutions."
Story

( Permalink: RADEON Enabler adds functionality      Submitted by Noel Sun Jul 11, 2004 )

Zen and the Art of Aspect-Oriented Programming
"AOP is a new programming methodology that captures and implements crosscutting concerns as modules. Where object-oriented programming (OOP) encapsulates core concerns into a class, AOP encapsulates crosscutting concerns into aspects. An AOP system allows you to implement crosscutting concerns and express weaving, or composition, rules. Another AOP system component, the weaving processing model, realizes the implementation."
Story

( Permalink: Zen and the Art of Aspect-Oriented Programming      Submitted by Noel Sun Jul 11, 2004 )

SSH Users beware: The hazards of X11 forwarding
"Enter SSH, a wonderful encrypted remote login/file transfer/port forwarding/you name it protocol. You probably use it when you log into to other Linux machines, such as your shell server, email account, etc. SSH has the ability to tunnel X11 connections through it - this feature is called X11 Forwarding. In brief, if you are on your desktop attached to an X11 display (you can run xclock for example) then when you SSH to a different machine, it can tunnel X11 over the connection. You can run graphical X11 applications on the remote machine, but they display back on your desktop."
Story

( Permalink: SSH Users beware: The hazards of X11 forwarding      Submitted by Noel Sun Jul 11, 2004 )

Tiger Looks Promising
"As I've come to realize, it's the small enhancements that really matter when it comes to a major OS upgrade such as this. In Panther, it was the "password required on wake up" that I liked, since I didn't want someone getting into my PowerBook if I left it sleeping on a desk for a moment. In 10.4, I'd really like to see something done about the Open/Save dialogue boxes, as they tend to be slow and a little bit difficult to navigate. And, of course, I'll welcome any other small improvements as well. Overall, the central features of OS 10.4 look interesting."
Story

( Permalink: Tiger Looks Promising      Submitted by Noel Sat Jul 10, 2004 )

Embracing strong passwords
"Strong passwords require eight to 14 characters, minimum, and a mix of case, numbers and symbols. But to a user, strong means more complicated. Users either simplify the password itself or help themselves remember it - often with a Post-It note on the monitor bezel or under the mouse pad. This issue requires human interaction to resolve."
Story

( Permalink: Embracing strong passwords      Submitted by Noel Sat Jul 10, 2004 )

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Older News

zCAPN and Tux's Adventure
(Sat Mar 27, 2004)

Common Programming Mistakes
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

Sun's Java Desktop System 2003
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

What Is New in SUSE LINUX 9.1?
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

Koming Back to KDE
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

MegaJogos: The case of the fully utilized CPU
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

Security One Step at a Time
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

Hunting Penguins in the Desert: The CES Report
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

Introduction to the Domain Name System
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

Using key-based authentication over SSH
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

Simulate devices using DSF
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

Linux: The Tide Rolls In
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

Novell management tool going open source
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

The Athlon 64 FX-53: AMD's Next Enthusiast Part 
(Wed Mar 24, 2004)

The politics of open-source software
(Wed Mar 24, 2004)

Mail Server Survey March 2004
(Wed Mar 24, 2004)

Interview with the author of Konsole
(Wed Mar 24, 2004)

PCLinuxOS 2K4 Preview5 LiveCD
(Wed Mar 24, 2004)

Poweroid 1204 silent PC
(Wed Mar 24, 2004)

Determining Free Physical RAM
(Wed Mar 24, 2004)

Introduction to Decoding
(Tue Mar 23, 2004)

Linux Memory Forensics
(Tue Mar 23, 2004)

Can a Red Hat Guru Survive on a Lindows Laptop?
(Tue Mar 23, 2004)

Joseph Eckert of SUSE LINUX
(Tue Mar 23, 2004)

Mainstream Games on the Linux Desktop
(Tue Mar 23, 2004)

Application tracing in a complex system
(Tue Mar 23, 2004)

Personal Backups with rdiff-backup
(Mon Mar 22, 2004)

Scheduler Performance: ULE vs. 4BSD
(Mon Mar 22, 2004)

Driving to Laptopia
(Mon Mar 22, 2004)

Eric Laffoon, keeper of Quanta
(Mon Mar 22, 2004)

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