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AirPort Express's Dangling Wires
"By splitting the WAN and the LAN, Apple was able to offer different functions on each port, essentially creating two separate networks with the base station acting as a router between them. This approach prevents "backwash" in which the private network addresses are fed out over the WAN port, potentially confusing dynamic address assignment for other ISP customers. The graphite unit allowed this backwash; the snow models avoided it by separating the network segments."
Story

( Permalink: AirPort Express's Dangling Wires      Submitted by Noel Fri Jul 16, 2004 )

Take Control of Your AirPort Network
"Make your AirPort network fly with the help of Wi-Fi networking expert Glenn Fleishman! Glenn shows you how to select the best networking gear (AirPort hardware and cheaper options!), position your base station for optimal performance, configure your devices, and lock out snoopers. Learn the four things to consider when purchasing hardware (and what device to avoid!), solutions to six common configuration problems, and four ways to extend your network's range. Whether you're just getting started with wireless or you have an existing network you want to expand or make more secure, you'll find up-to-date information that will save you money and time. Cool extras! Locate adapters for older Macs and get the scoop on AirPort Express and AirTunes! "
Story

( Permalink: Take Control of Your AirPort Network      Submitted by Noel Fri Jul 16, 2004 )

The art of UNIX programming
Many books have been written about the UNIX operating system. Many of them are so-called cookbooks while others are packed with theoretical knowledge. This one is peculiar as it incorporates both types, packing the best material from each. Story

( Permalink: The art of UNIX programming      Submitted by LogError Fri Jul 16, 2004 )

Slackware 10: First Impressions
My first experience with Slackware Linux came with version 9.1, after 4 years of using various versions of Red Hat and SUSE Linux. I disliked the general direction these distributions were moving in and didn't see their increasing focus on the "big end of town" as auguring well for either myself or clients of my small one-person IT consultancy business. I quickly became a Slackware convert and have since used it exclusively for all my server deployments. Check in for more and 14 screenshots from Slackware 10.
Story

( Permalink: Slackware 10: First Impressions      Submitted by Anonymous Fri Jul 16, 2004 )

802.11 Wireless LAN Fundamentals
Wireless networks and technologies are no longer a new concept. The freedom of flexibility, increase of productivity and the much sought-after mobility are only few of the benefits that 802.11-based networks provide. This appeals to the enterprise and home users to take the next step and deploy a wireless network onto their network and business infrastructure. To ensure a seamless integration and deployment, Cisco has encompassed all the necessary and relevant information into one small and useful book. eBCVG

( Permalink: 802.11 Wireless LAN Fundamentals      Submitted by Dr.T Fri Jul 16, 2004 )

The Gift Economy and Free Software
"A "gift economy" is a social system in which status is given by how much one shares or gives to their community, as opposed to an "exchange economy" where status is given to those who own or control the most stuff. In today's world we're used to the latter economic philosophy as it has been closely affiliated with the capitalist system since at least the Industrial Revolution and the invention of the corporation. But the Industrial Age is over -- this is the Information Age now, and things are changing. "
Story

( Permalink: The Gift Economy and Free Software      Submitted by Noel Fri Jul 16, 2004 )

Scripting Languages
"The first scripting language many administrators learn is the Unix shell. For beginners, the nice thing about the shell is that you can work interactively at a command prompt to get used to how the shell operates, what it likes, and what it tends to choke on. You can get to know the error messages and quirks of your chosen shell, all while doing useful things on a day-to-day basis. For example, even a bash shell beginner probably knows the ls, pwd, and echo commands. Early bash scripts will probably be simple lists of shell commands, like this:"
Story

( Permalink: Scripting Languages      Submitted by Noel Fri Jul 16, 2004 )

A novel authentication method for Apache
This article shows you step by step how to compile and configure mod_auth_ibmdb2 (an Apache authentication module) using DB2 Universal Database as the database for storing user and group information. It explains the creation and use of the User Defined Functions (UDFs) for generating passwords in DB2. The UDFs provided are compatible to the functions that are used in Apache's htpasswd utility.

( Permalink: A novel authentication method for Apache      Submitted by Anonymous Fri Jul 16, 2004 )

At the Sounding Edge: LilyPond
"Scores made with computers almost always look bland and uninspiring, but for what reason? Machines may be mechanical, but why should their products be? With that thought in mind we started programming seven years ago. We have tried to capture the rules of good music engraving in a program, and that program is called LilyPond. We built it like we expect software to be: robust, open and flexible. The best is that you can create beautiful sheet music comfortably with LilyPond."
Story

( Permalink: At the Sounding Edge: LilyPond      Submitted by Noel Fri Jul 16, 2004 )

What to Do When You Need a Little More Room
"Last month, as the rest of the editorial staff was putting the final touches on another stellar issue, I was struggling with some work-related deadlines. In the few moments I took off for fun, my iBook decided to assert itself and prove which of us was boss. Usually a rock-solid workhorse, it suddenly began balking at the more intensive tasks. Near-crashes and a kernel panic or two were involved. It was close for a while there, but I finally regained the upper hand."
Story

( Permalink: What to Do When You Need a Little More Room      Submitted by Noel Thu Jul 15, 2004 )

SysAdmin to SysAdmin: Approaching Perl
"Writing an article about getting started with Perl is a bit like writing an article about getting started with neurosurgery. Sure, I could cover some basics -- but it would only leave you scratching your head the first time something comes up that you've never seen. I'd hate to see a neurosurgeon in that position! But no matter what you do, there are always times when you just don't know an answer. A much more horrible fate to suffer is to have no clue where to go to find the answer. So, this article covers one or two basics of Perl, just to show you that's it's not so scary, and a future article will tell you where to find solutions when you're on your own."
Story

( Permalink: SysAdmin to SysAdmin: Approaching Perl      Submitted by Noel Thu Jul 15, 2004 )

Dariusz Arciszewski and David Vignoni
"David Vignoni, of Nuvola Iconset fame, is designing a set of task oriented icons for use in Kontact, replacing the application oriented icons (you can see a preview of these icons on David's website. David needs no introduction, as his Nuvola iconset is the highest rated iconset in kde-look.org, and he is already an KDE contributor (he developed icons to the KDE Edutainment Project, KMess, and other icon themes for KDE, like Lush and SKY). We asked David some questions about his work and KDE."
Story

( Permalink: Dariusz Arciszewski and David Vignoni      Submitted by Noel Thu Jul 15, 2004 )

Inter-Process Communication
"Inter-Process Communication, which in short is known as IPC, deals mainly with the techniques and mechanisms that facilitate communication between processes. Now, why do we need special separate mechanisms or techniques for communicating between processes? Why isn't it possible to have information shared between two processes without using such special mechanisms? Let us start from something primitive. Imagine you have two glasses completely filled with water. One glass contains hot water and the other contains cold water. What can you do to make the temperature of water in both the glasses equal? The simplest answer will be to mix the water from both the glasses in a glass with much bigger capacity."
Story

( Permalink: Inter-Process Communication      Submitted by Noel Thu Jul 15, 2004 )

BOOQ BP3 System
"The backpack itself can be used without the PowerSleeve, and I have done so many times, when I either did not require or did not have the PowerBook. While it won’t compare to the Brain Bag in its overall capacity, the BP3 is loaded with pockets and storage space. I was able to cram everything I “must” have with me while “Book-totin” and still had room left over to wedge my camera bag in on top. Again, it doesn’t match up to the Brain Bag in capacity, but I favor the BP3 because of its pocket and zipper layouts."
Story

( Permalink: BOOQ BP3 System      Submitted by Noel Wed Jul 14, 2004 )

Safely delete Linux files with libtrash
"Libtrash is more than a simple utility. It's a shared library that overrides the default actions Linux uses to delete files. Once libtrash is installed, deleted files will be moved into a subdirectory of the user's home directory named Trash. Libtrash allows users to use the normal Linux commands for deleting files, and libtrash will work with any files on the system. "
Story

( Permalink: Safely delete Linux files with libtrash      Submitted by Noel Wed Jul 14, 2004 )

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Older News

Introducing the Nanode
(Mon Mar 29, 2004)

Initializing User Defined Data Structures
(Mon Mar 29, 2004)

Chrooted Movabletype on OpenBSD
(Mon Mar 29, 2004)

Multibooting with GRUB, Part 2
(Sun Mar 28, 2004)

Management with Condor, Part 3
(Sun Mar 28, 2004)

Suse Linux Professional 9
(Sun Mar 28, 2004)

CLI for noobies: what day is this?
(Sun Mar 28, 2004)

Arch Linux version
(Sun Mar 28, 2004)

Watch TV on your Linux computer
(Sun Mar 28, 2004)

Man & Woman of a Thousand Faces
(Sat Mar 27, 2004)

Forensic Analysis of a Live Linux System
(Sat Mar 27, 2004)

Kernel Preemption, To Enable Or Not To Enable
(Sat Mar 27, 2004)

O'Reilly's Pocket Guide to Linux
(Sat Mar 27, 2004)

Review of dyne:bolic 1.2: The Multimedia Linux
(Sat Mar 27, 2004)

Logical Linux partitions on IBM's iSeries
(Sat Mar 27, 2004)

zCAPN and Tux's Adventure
(Sat Mar 27, 2004)

Common Programming Mistakes
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

Sun's Java Desktop System 2003
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

What Is New in SUSE LINUX 9.1?
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

Koming Back to KDE
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

MegaJogos: The case of the fully utilized CPU
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

Security One Step at a Time
(Fri Mar 26, 2004)

Hunting Penguins in the Desert: The CES Report
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

Introduction to the Domain Name System
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

Using key-based authentication over SSH
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

Simulate devices using DSF
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

Linux: The Tide Rolls In
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

Novell management tool going open source
(Thu Mar 25, 2004)

The Athlon 64 FX-53: AMD's Next Enthusiast Part 
(Wed Mar 24, 2004)

The politics of open-source software
(Wed Mar 24, 2004)

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