# RootPrompt.org   Nothing but Unix.[Home] [Features] [Programming] [Mac OS X] [Search]

OSX Security Concerns? osRadio Responds
Security Focus is a respected citizen within the technology journalism scene. The web site typically publishes insightful and educational news or commentary on computer-related security issues.
However, journalist Daniel Hanson penned an editorial for the site that questioned OSX's security capabilities but based the premise for that piece upon several misleading pieces of information. osRadio's own Kelly McNeill took the time to respond to the article in the following broadcast editorial.

( Permalink: OSX Security Concerns? osRadio Responds      Submitted by Kelly McNeill Sat Jul 24, 2004 )

How to Misunderstand the Enterprise Linux Desktop
"One measure of enterprise acceptance achieved by Linux is its place among the elite operating systems produced by IBM, HP, Sun, SGI, Microsoft and Sony. In addition, two Linux enterprise distributions recently achieved the coveted status of Common Criteria Certification. This certification offers governments a high level of confidence in using Linux"
Story

( Permalink: How to Misunderstand the Enterprise Linux Desktop      Submitted by Noel Sat Jul 24, 2004 )

Little Live Linuxes
"hat I really want to discuss are the "Live Linux" distros that are less than 210 MB in size. These are not as well known as their big brother Knoppix. Their small size allows them to fit onto the smaller 3" CD-Rs. These fit nicely into your shirt pocket, and are easy to carry. Don't let their small size fool you though, some of these little monsters pack one heck of a punch. While I'm sure I haven't begun to scratch the surface when it comes to the total number of these available, I'd like to introduce you to a few of them that you might not be aware of. The four small distros I will describe are outstanding, and worthy of your bandwidth to acquire them. "
Story

( Permalink: Little Live Linuxes      Submitted by Noel Sat Jul 24, 2004 )

Sharp's Zaurus SL-6000L: A Free Software PDA
"While this new Zaurus takes aim at the corporate market (which is not a good reason to make purchases so painful), it features everything a Linux geek may need on a PDA. Powered by a StrongArm PXA 255 running at 400MHz, with 64MB of ROM and 64MB of RAM, it features a small keyboard, a serial and an infrared port, one compact flash, and one SD slot--just like every other Zaurus currently sold, with the exception of the 128MB SLC-860."
Story

( Permalink: Sharp's Zaurus SL-6000L: A Free Software PDA      Submitted by Noel Sat Jul 24, 2004 )

Review: OpenBSD 3.5
"OpenBSD's installation script is spartan, and therefore intimidating, and leaves you to fend for yourself at a blank terminal screen at the end. The partitioning utility's help function lists too many commands to display on one screen. If you don't know the shift-pgup trick to scroll up in a terminal, you'll have a hard time figuring out how to add a new partition. Fortunately the CD set comes with a walk-through of the entire installation procedure, so even if you get stuck there or at another part of the process, you can work through it."
Story

( Permalink: Review: OpenBSD 3.5      Submitted by Noel Sat Jul 24, 2004 )

Comparing Linux and AIX
"AIX runs only on IBM's own hardware, based around the POWER family of processors, of which the POWER5 is the latest. (Apple's G5 chip is the baby brother of the POWER4.) Pretty much all the adapters and components that run in those servers are either made or rebadged by IBM. In the past IBM has almost given AIX away, making money from the hardware and services instead of the operating system software."
Story

( Permalink: Comparing Linux and AIX      Submitted by Noel Sat Jul 24, 2004 )

SpinRite 6.0 for Linux Users
"SpinRite 6.0 now runs independently of any installed operating system and associated filesystem and can work on all Windows formats, DOS FAT and Linux. Even Macintosh owners can use it, although they need to cable the Mac drive to a PC. Long-time SpinRite users need no introduction to the product. SpinRite is a utility for verifying, maintaining or repairing hard drives. Although Linux utilities such as chkdsk look at file integrity, SpinRite tests magnetic media for data integrity and can warn of impending failure. If SpinRite is used after data is lost, it may be able to recover data by coercing unreadable bits back to consciousness. Other handy uses are identifying partitions on a multiple OS drive and benchmarking."
Story

( Permalink: SpinRite 6.0 for Linux Users      Submitted by Noel Sat Jul 24, 2004 )

Lithium-ion batteries
"For proper maintenance of a lithium-based battery, itís important to keep the electrons in it moving occasionally. Apple does not recommend leaving your portable plugged in all the time. An ideal use would be a commuter who uses her iBook on the train, then plugs it in at the office to charge. This keeps the battery juices flowing. If on the other hand, you use a desktop computer at work, and save a notebook for infrequent travel, Apple recommends charging and discharging its battery at least once per month. Need a reminder? Add an event to your desktopís iCal."
Story

( Permalink: Lithium-ion batteries      Submitted by Noel Fri Jul 23, 2004 )

How to Fall in Love with Your iSight, Again
"Admit it. You are completely bored with your iSight. Your impulsive, giddy love affair has all but dried up, now that the reality of video chatting has settled in. To paraphrase the band Talking Heads, you may find yourself in front of a beautiful geekosphere, and you may find yourself on some beautiful bandwidth, but you may ask yourself: where is my useful device? Is this my beautiful iSight? How did I get here? My God! What have I done? You're having a mid-shelf-life crisis."
Story

( Permalink: How to Fall in Love with Your iSight, Again      Submitted by Noel Fri Jul 23, 2004 )

Go Straight To The Source with CTrace
"It is easy to become dependent on debuggers. They allow us to examine variables and to control flow execution as our applications run. But what can you do when your application isn't working and the debugger can't help you? Some applications, by nature, make using a debugger impractical; multithreaded applications fall into this category. Xavier Leroy, the author of LinuxThreads says, "Debuggers are not really effective for subtle concurrency problems, because they disrupt the program too much.""
Story

( Permalink: Go Straight To The Source with CTrace      Submitted by Noel Fri Jul 23, 2004 )

Securing Linux: What it means to be secure
Only the paranoid survive, and that is no less true when securing Linux systems as any other. Fortunately, a host of security features are built into the kernel, are packaged with one of the many Linux distributions, or are available separately as open source applications. The first in a series, this article starts you on your way to understanding security concepts and potential threats, and sets the stage for what you really need to know: how to secure and harden a Linux-based installation.

( Permalink: Securing Linux: What it means to be secure      Submitted by Anonymous Fri Jul 23, 2004 )

Changing the Parameters of a File System
"In tuning file systems on the Solaris Operating System, changing some parameters of a file system usually destroys the data on it. For instance, changing the cache segment block size in the volume of a T3 requires that you delete the existing volume, which destroys the data on it. After that it could take a significant amount of time for the volume to be reinitialized if you've got a large amount of disk space. In addition, you may need to change the segment size of a logical unit number (LUN) in a Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) box, which requires deleting the existing LUN, and so on. Even if you're changing the parameter of a metadevice, or renaming the metadevice, you'll need to unmount the file system."
Story

( Permalink: Changing the Parameters of a File System      Submitted by Noel Fri Jul 23, 2004 )

Training Ethical Hackers: Training the Enemy?
Training information security professionals carries the risk of training ethical and malicious hackers side-by-side. This paper defines ethical hacking, differentiates it from malicious hacking, presents some of the ways that ethical hacking is taught, identifies some of the risks associated with this training, and concludes with suggestions on how to minimize these risks. eBCVG

( Permalink: Training Ethical Hackers: Training the Enemy?      Submitted by MarekB Fri Jul 23, 2004 )

IceWM - The Cool Window Manager
IceWM is a lightweight window manager for UNIX-like systems. Although widely used, it is often underrated - there is hardly any IceWM-related content on the Internet. This article is Rahul Gaitonde's attempt to share my experiences as a longtime IceWM user. It contains tips and tricks, usage scenarios, and makes use of examples whenever possible to better demonstrate IceWM's features and capabilities.

( Permalink: IceWM - The Cool Window Manager      Submitted by Anonymous Fri Jul 23, 2004 )

Apple's Cheaper, Juicier IPod†
"Apple Computer has introduced lower-priced versions of its iPod digital music player with longer battery life, positioning itself against rivals trying to use lower prices to undercut iPod sales. Apple said the new model iPod has up to 12 hours of battery life, compared with eight hours in previous models. Poor battery performance in some iPods has drawn criticism."
Story

( Permalink: Apple's Cheaper, Juicier IPod†      Submitted by Noel Thu Jul 22, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Adding & Changing Data in MySQL
(Thu Apr 8, 2004)

Sun Wants to Make Linux 3D
(Thu Apr 8, 2004)

A taste of Wine: Transition from Windows to Linux
(Thu Apr 8, 2004)

Overcoming Asymmetric Routing on Multi-Homed Serve
(Thu Apr 8, 2004)

I fought the scammer... and I won
(Wed Apr 7, 2004)

The Secret Source of Google's Power
(Wed Apr 7, 2004)

Creating an OpenBSD Package
(Wed Apr 7, 2004)

Linux on the GameCube
(Wed Apr 7, 2004)

Cool tools for remote administration
(Wed Apr 7, 2004)

POWER to the people: Chipmaking at IBM
(Wed Apr 7, 2004)

Possio's PX30 hackable wireless router
(Tue Apr 6, 2004)

Running BIND9 in a chroot cage using NetBSD 1.6.2
(Tue Apr 6, 2004)

Analyzing PostgreSQL SQL usage
(Tue Apr 6, 2004)

Review - Building Wireless Community Networks 2/e
(Tue Apr 6, 2004)

The future of phishing
(Tue Apr 6, 2004)

The Standard Template Library
(Tue Apr 6, 2004)

Chrooting daemons and system processes
(Mon Apr 5, 2004)

IT in a Box ably serves small business needs
(Mon Apr 5, 2004)

Keeping Fedora Up to Date with Yum
(Mon Apr 5, 2004)

Migrating from Windows to Linux
(Mon Apr 5, 2004)

WordPerfect 8 for Linux
(Mon Apr 5, 2004)

Scripting Clinic: The Bash Continues
(Mon Apr 5, 2004)

Port scanning and Nmap 3.5
(Sun Apr 4, 2004)

Whose site is it anyway?
(Sun Apr 4, 2004)

Opteron Workstation Boards Reviewed
(Sun Apr 4, 2004)

Xandros 2.0 Business Edition
(Sun Apr 4, 2004)

Linux Kernel Comparison: 2.6.4 vs. 2.4.25
(Sun Apr 4, 2004)

Profiling programs using gprof
(Sun Apr 4, 2004)

Implement Bayesian inference using PHP, Part 1
(Sat Apr 3, 2004)

Playing for Keeps
(Sat Apr 3, 2004)

[Latest News] [Newer News] [Older News]

Our content can be syndicated: Main Page Mac Page
(Validate RSS code)

Copyright 1999-2005 Noel Davis. Noel also runs web sites about sailing and kayaking.
All trademarks are the property of their owners.
All articles are owned by their author