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Inside My Applications Folder
"NetNewsWire Lite: A functional, powerful, Lite version of a piece of a different software, named, oddly enough, NetNewsWire. Doesn't have that Apple touch, but it's the best we're going to get before Safari gets RSS in Tiger, so, cheers! Make no mistake, this is a well designed, professional, functional piece of software. Although it might be nicer if it were a Safari plugin."
Story

( Permalink: Inside My Applications Folder      Submitted by Noel Fri Aug 13, 2004 )

Waldo Bastian on Kiosk and the Linux desktop
"My name is Waldo Bastian, I started working on KDE in 1998, since 1999 I work on KDE for SUSE LINUX. My main focus is to provide the underlying non-GUI technology for KDE applications, examples of that are the IO-slave handling, command line parsing, handling of temporary files, configuration files, the internal generation of the KDE menu and DCOP (inter-process communication)."
Story

( Permalink: Waldo Bastian on Kiosk and the Linux desktop      Submitted by Noel Fri Aug 13, 2004 )

Making use of SNMP
"The first thing to know about SNMP is that it is a service that is structured such that an SNMP agent sitting on a target host can be queried by remote hosts for various bits of information. Only the target host (the one you want information about) needs to be running an SNMP daemon. The client making the queries just needs some tool capable of making SNMP queries and parsing the output. Most Linux server and client tools are supplied by the Net-SNMP project. A quick poke around your system to locate snmpwalk or snmpget should let you know in short order if you have the client tools installed. The server daemon is called, predictably, snmpd."
Story

( Permalink: Making use of SNMP      Submitted by Noel Fri Aug 13, 2004 )

Computer Security for the Home and Small Office
"The book covers popular OSs replacements for Windows applications and utilities; it explains vulnerabilities; it offers practical setup information for both Windows and Linux to harden a system and make it extremely difficult to attack. The Preface describes the book in general terms. The Introduction explains firewalls and their limitations, and explains how to install Mozilla to limit email and http exploits and spam. Chapter One debunks the malicious-hacker mythology and shows that most so-called hackers are only script kiddies who are easily thwarted with commonsense tactics."
Story

( Permalink: Computer Security for the Home and Small Office      Submitted by Noel Fri Aug 13, 2004 )

VPNs – Blessing Or Curse?
VPNs have recently moved on to become second generation technology. From having one or two VPNs, companies are now looking to install large numbers. These numbers are likely to grow steadily and in a few years’ time, organisations may potentially have thousands of VPNs. This proliferation brings undoubted benefits, but also some very major challenges for IT department. story

( Permalink: VPNs – Blessing Or Curse?      Submitted by Scott Fri Aug 13, 2004 )

Impressions of LinuxWorld August 2004
"I met with an eclectic mix of vendors, some of which I discuss below. One constant, however, was evident in what most of them were trying to do: abstract away the limitations of the hardware and software layers. For example, VMware was trying to abstract the limits of the machine you are running on, while AMD was trying to eliminate the difference between 32-bit and 64-bit computing, Veritas was trying to abstract away the differences in filesystems, whereas Trolltech was abstracting away differences in GUIs and PyX was trying to eliminate the differences in dealing with local or remote filesystem devices."
Story

( Permalink: Impressions of LinuxWorld August 2004      Submitted by Noel Fri Aug 13, 2004 )

Attacking the phishing threat - what every company
By now just about every person with an email inbox has been exposed to a phishing scam. Spoofs are showing up with alarming frequency and to make matters worse, criminals have upped the ante with increasingly sophisticated coding and graphics.
Story

( Permalink: Attacking the phishing threat - what every company      Submitted by LogError Fri Aug 13, 2004 )

Inside SSH, Part 1
"This is the first part of a three-part series where I'll show you how to turn on, secure, and leverage the power of your Mac's built-in SSH server. Along the path, we're going to have a look at asymmetric cryptography, digital signatures, and SSH tunneling -- some very interesting concepts that, with a bit of practice, will allow you to take your computing experience to a whole new level."
Story

( Permalink: Inside SSH, Part 1      Submitted by Noel Thu Aug 12, 2004 )

Inside SSH, Part 2
"While setting up our SSH server and client, we'll assume that you have physical access to both machines and that these are conveniently located next to each other, so that you can read information off one screen and type it onto the other computer's keyboard. While it's possible to follow the steps we outline in less practical environments, you may need to keep a pad and a pencil handy. Also, make sure that nobody is "shoulder surfing" (reading information over your shoulder) while you work on the computers. We are, in the following paragraphs, going to deal with sensitive passwords that should be kept secret at the risk of ruining all your security and privacy efforts."
Story

( Permalink: Inside SSH, Part 2      Submitted by Noel Thu Aug 12, 2004 )

Inside SSH, Part 3
"Editing configuration files is actually extremely simple once you know how to work with them. These files are simply text documents containing a list of settings and their associated values--one setting and its corresponding value are usually on the same line. To change the value, simply erase the text and replace it with the new one. In some cases, the line will be preceded by a hash sign (#), meaning that it won't be taken into account by SSH. Simply remove the sign after you've changed the value so that the change you've made can be read and taken into account. Such a line is a default, meaning that it is normally the value your SSH server adopts. However, uncommenting it will make things clearer for you and may help you avoid an unexpected configuration glitch."
Story

( Permalink: Inside SSH, Part 3      Submitted by Noel Thu Aug 12, 2004 )

Inside SSH, Part 4
"A few months ago, Apple introduced a command called "sofwareupdate" that performs the exact same job as the Software Update preferences pane. It asks the Apple servers whether a Mac is up-to-date and installs updates if applicable. In order to try it, simply enter "softwareupdate -l" in a Terminal window. This will launch the Software Update engine and list any updates that you may need. If everything goes well, you should see a copyright line followed by "Your software is up-to-date." Otherwise, you'll see a list of the updates."
Story

( Permalink: Inside SSH, Part 4      Submitted by Noel Thu Aug 12, 2004 )

 Linux and EM64T; Intel's 64-bit Suggestion
"Since the excuse to not compare Athlon 64s to Intel Pentium based processors has always been "you can't compare apples to oranges," we found ourselves fairly entertained to come into the possession of a 3.6GHz EM64T Xeon processor. Intel's EM64T is Intel's true x86_64 initiative. This 3.6GHz Xeon processor is actually the exact same CPU in as the LGA775 Pentium 4F we will see in just a few weeks. We are offering a preview of an unreleased processor on 64-bit Linux systems. Now, we have Intel and AMD 64-bit x86 processors, 64-bit Linux operating systems and a few days to get some benchmarking done."
Story

( Permalink:  Linux and EM64T; Intel's 64-bit Suggestion      Submitted by Noel Thu Aug 12, 2004 )

Linux Web Filtering with DansGuardian and ClamAV

A web filter is software that can filter the type of content a Web browser displays. The filter checks the content of a Web page against a set of rules and replaces any unwanted content with an alternative Web page, usually an "Access Denied" page. The type of content to be filtered is usually controlled by a systems administrator. Web filters are used in schools, libraries, homes, and companies to safeguard personnel from obscene content on the Internet. The combination with different anti virus software makes it even more powerful and helps to protect our own network against the common threats.

Read more at Linux-Tip.net

( Permalink: Linux Web Filtering with DansGuardian and ClamAV      Submitted by Frank Neugebauer Thu Aug 12, 2004 )

Getting On-line Anywhere with Bluetooth and GPRS
"Bluetooth and GPRS, when used in tandem, let traditionally dumb devices become intelligent. A Bluetooth-enabled blood pressure or heart-rate monitor can use a nearby Bluetooth-aware cell phone to send the readings instantly to a doctor's computer over the Internet by way of GPRS. A Bluetooth MP3 player can be programmed to download songs using GPRS through a Bluetooth-enabled cell phone at night, when the rates are lower. GPRS thus extends the Internet to the increasing number of small and low-power Bluetooth products that do not have conventional network capability."
Story

( Permalink: Getting On-line Anywhere with Bluetooth and GPRS      Submitted by Noel Thu Aug 12, 2004 )

DragonFlyBSD 1.0A: A strong start
"A year ago, when the DragonFlyBSD project was announced, I scoffed at it. "A FreeBSD fork, and they're not even using the new technology release!" I figured it was just a disgruntled developer's one-man crusade against the programmers he didn't get along with on the FreeBSD team. Imagine my surprise when I read the announcement of the first release. Yes, DragonFlyBSD has survived long enough to gain developer support and meet several of its stratospheric goals. That doesn't mean it works properly yet, but there's a promising future ahead for this operating system."
Story

( Permalink: DragonFlyBSD 1.0A: A strong start      Submitted by Noel Thu Aug 12, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
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Older News

Linux: ketchup, Automatic Kernel Patching
(Mon May 3, 2004)

The Return of WordPerfect
(Mon May 3, 2004)

Strong Passwords
(Mon May 3, 2004)

SuperKaramba
(Mon May 3, 2004)

Interview with Miguel de Icaza
(Sun May 2, 2004)

Quick and dirty typesetting with APT
(Sun May 2, 2004)

Tune Eclipse's startup performance
(Sun May 2, 2004)

Getting Some GRUB For Linux
(Sun May 2, 2004)

Sun considers GPL license for Solaris
(Sun May 2, 2004)

X Developer's Meeting
(Sun May 2, 2004)

Alexander Kellett
(Sat May 1, 2004)

Konstructing a New KDE Desktop
(Sat May 1, 2004)

Tapping the Matrix, Part 2
(Sat May 1, 2004)

 Tool of the Month: gLabels
(Sat May 1, 2004)

Free Software's killer applications
(Sat May 1, 2004)

Scribus 1.1.6 Reviewed
(Fri Apr 30, 2004)

Sun Java Desktop 2003 Review
(Fri Apr 30, 2004)

A Week with Linspire 4.5
(Fri Apr 30, 2004)

Review: OpenBSD 3.4 SPARC64 Edition
(Fri Apr 30, 2004)

What Lies Ahead For Linux
(Fri Apr 30, 2004)

Wolfgang Denk of Denx Software Engineering
(Fri Apr 30, 2004)

OpenBSD/hppa Snapshot Installation Report
(Thu Apr 29, 2004)

Tapping the Matrix, Part 1
(Thu Apr 29, 2004)

Compressing Web Content
(Thu Apr 29, 2004)

Exploiting Software: How to Break Code
(Thu Apr 29, 2004)

Lphoto & Lsongs... Prepare To Be Linspired
(Thu Apr 29, 2004)

Deploy software, autonomically
(Thu Apr 29, 2004)

Building a 64-bit Dual-Opteron Linux Workstation
(Wed Apr 28, 2004)

Abusing the Linux MODULE_LICENSE Macro
(Wed Apr 28, 2004)

CLI for noobies: not your father's batch
(Wed Apr 28, 2004)

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