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Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow
"Among the many wonders of director Kerry Conran’s debut feature movie, “Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow,” none is more remarkable than how he tried to make it — on a single desktop computer, in 1994, before desktop computers were ready to fully cooperate. “I actually sat down to create a whole feature film, by myself, on a Mac IIsi,” says Conran. “And I didn’t care in a way how long it was going to take, because I knew it was possible.”"
Story

( Permalink: Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow      Submitted by Noel Mon Sep 20, 2004 )

Review: VMware 4.5.2
"Virtual machine software allows you to run one operating system (and its applications) from within the environment of another. For years the most recognized name in virtual machine software for the x86 architecture has been VMware, whose eponymous industry-leading product supports a wide variety of guest operating systems. Recently EMC Corp. bought VMware, and has since released VMware Workstation 4.5 for $199. The most recent release is 4.5.2, which adds 64-bit host operating system support. There isn't much that VMware Workstation can't do, except perhaps achieve the level of performance that a genuine installation of the guest operating system enjoys."
Story

( Permalink: Review: VMware 4.5.2      Submitted by Noel Mon Sep 20, 2004 )

Linux C and C++ Compilers
"Reality is, alas, somewhat less than ideal; benchmarks are quite subjective, prone to interpretation, and rarely show a clear picture. Benchmarking is always a tricky business, especially when it comes to compilers: A reviewer selects a limited suite of benchmarks that demonstrate specific aspects of code generation, thus predicting general compiler performance from a limited data set. Not terribly scientific, to be sure."
Story

( Permalink: Linux C and C++ Compilers      Submitted by Noel Mon Sep 20, 2004 )

NetFront: Fast Browser v3.2 Released for Linux
So, you think that GtkHTML, GTK::Gecko and Dillo are the only web browsers written using GTK+? Think again, as OSNews presents the SDK/desktop version of the mobile browser NetFront (especially popular in Japan), which supports Javascript, CSS and SSL (making it a usable modern browser) while retaining very small memory footprint and overall speed. More info, links and screenshots on the review here.

( Permalink: NetFront: Fast Browser v3.2 Released for Linux      Submitted by Anonymous Mon Sep 20, 2004 )

Heuristic Scanning - Where to Next?
One of the fundamental problems within heuristic scanners is the issue of positive and negative scanning. Over the last couple of years a number of scanners have appeared in the consumer market with heuristic scanning abilities only. While this scanning approach will be the scanning method of the future unfortunately these products have failed miserably. story

( Permalink: Heuristic Scanning - Where to Next?      Submitted by Scott Mon Sep 20, 2004 )

Panther server and Active Directory
"Over the past few weeks, I've taken a close look at Apple's Open Directory (OD) and Microsoft's AD and here's what I found: If you have less than 10,000 users, the difference in response from either is negligible and you can be comfortable that OD is rock-solid and secure. It is also easier to manage in a simple setup, and with its Unix underpinnings you can do extensive customization if you choose. But be aware that the Workgroup Manager GUI just stops working at 19,999 users. While AD is much more complex at the onset, once the learning curve flattens you'll find you have all the tools you need."
Story

( Permalink: Panther server and Active Directory      Submitted by Noel Sat Sep 18, 2004 )

Building A Lo-Fat Linux Desktop
"A speedy desktop is largely just a matter of using a window manager and applications that suit your hardware. And by the way, just because you don't use the KDE or GNOME desktop environments doesn't mean you shouldn't install them, or at least their core libraries. KDE and GNOME apps will run quite well under a lightweight window manager, so if you have the disk space, I recommend installing both. In my experience though, GNOME/GTK apps load appreciably quicker than the KDE equivalents. Listed below are some suggestions for the type of apps. that most people use everyday, all of which work nicely on my 233/64 box - and most of this stuff should be fine with just 32megs of RAM. Keep in mind that these suggestions are only my own personal preferences; they certainly aren't the only way to do things. "
Story

( Permalink: Building A Lo-Fat Linux Desktop      Submitted by Noel Sat Sep 18, 2004 )

Open Source at Sun
"When you open source a formerly proprietary product, and want external developers to participate, you must give them more than just the source code. The external folks need to know as much about the code standards, architecture, release plans, open bugs, development priorities, etc. as the internal developers. If you just dump the source over the wall, the chances are you'll get patches back that don't integrate with the rest of what you're doing. When you reject a patch, frame it as "here's how we'd write it, here are the guidelines we follow"."
Story

( Permalink: Open Source at Sun      Submitted by Noel Sat Sep 18, 2004 )

Navy Sonar Opens Opportunities for Linux Clusters
"The Lockheed Martin Linux systems varied in two respects from the standard solution of the Apple Xserve. First, the solution did not use Apple's Mac OS X operating system. Secondly, Lockheed Martin built their own chassis and only used the internals of the Xserve. Lockheed Martin wanted the G4 PowerPC chips and Linux to provide a low heat, low power consumption solution. On a nuclear submarine, such features are essential."
Story

( Permalink: Navy Sonar Opens Opportunities for Linux Clusters      Submitted by Noel Sat Sep 18, 2004 )

Go to the Back of the Bus
"There IS a new USB standard in the works and it is at the heart of Microsoft's sudden interest in USB security. Co-developed with Intel, the new USB standard specifically excludes Linux and probably OS X devices as well. I'm told the Intel folks are quite embarrassed about this, but feel powerless to do anything about it. The new standard will be sold to USB device makers as a chance to replace every device they've already sold, and PC makers will be told they can do the same with every desktop. But for non-Windows computers the likely result will be that Windows-standard USB devices will no longer be compatible, which means there will have to be two USB standards, and the non-Windows variety will have lower sales volume and therefore higher prices."
Story

( Permalink: Go to the Back of the Bus      Submitted by Noel Sat Sep 18, 2004 )

 Salling Clicker: Use handheld devices as remote
"My favorite feature of Clicker, however, is the proximity control. I use it to set my iChat status and pause/play iTunes when I go to and from my office. And because it's Applescript friendly, every time I come back to my desk, Victoria tells me, "Welcome back, Jason. You rock so hard. Super sweet." I like the primary function of my cell phone, but with Clicker and my Mac, the phone is propelled out of the mundane and into the fascinating. Fun stuff, indeed. "
Story

( Permalink:  Salling Clicker: Use handheld devices as remote      Submitted by Noel Fri Sep 17, 2004 )

Inside News on O'Reilly's Mac OS X Conference
" also want to draw your attention to Thursday morning's feature presentations. Andy Hertzfled will open with his talk, Macintosh Folklore. You may have visited Andy's terrific site, Folklore.org, or even heard about his upcoming book, published by O'Reilly. But in this talk he'll share a few stories that can't be found anywhere. And Andy should know. He was there when it all began. After Andy speaks, David Pogue takes the stage and zooms us forward with his presentation, Toward Mac OS XX. Yes, we'll be peering into the future of our favorite platform through the eyes of one of its most accomplished writers."
Story

( Permalink: Inside News on O'Reilly's Mac OS X Conference      Submitted by Noel Fri Sep 17, 2004 )

Centralized Log Server with syslog-ng and Stunnel
"As a result, most sites that centralize logging also wind up replacing the stock syslog daemon with something more secure and more flexible such as Metalog, msyslog, or something similar. One very popular syslog replacement is an open source program called syslog-ng. An organization can run syslog-ng on each UNIX host or just on the syslog server itself. If syslog-ng is run only on the log host, clients send data over UDP port 514 as usual, but better log organization and manipulation can be accomplished on the server. The benefit of running syslog-ng on each UNIX host is the ability to encrypt the logging channel with IPSec or the utility Stunnel so that data is not readable by the casual sniffer. "
Story

( Permalink: Centralized Log Server with syslog-ng and Stunnel      Submitted by Noel Fri Sep 17, 2004 )

Coverage Measurement and Profiling
"Coverage measurement is the recording of what paths were executed in code. Coverage can be measured with different degrees of granularity. The coarsest level is function coverage, measuring which functions were called; then comes statement coverage, measuring which lines of code were executed; and finally, branch coverage, measuring which logic conditions in branch statements were satisfied. When someone refers to coverage measurement usually statement or branch coverage is being discussed. gcov is the standard GNU coverage measurement tool, and it requires GCC."
Story

( Permalink: Coverage Measurement and Profiling       Submitted by Noel Fri Sep 17, 2004 )

Aural Heaven: IPod and Analog 
"The store's owner, 50-year-old Takeyuki Ishii, recommends plugging an iPod into an FM transmitter, such as Griffin Technology's iTrip, and listening to music through the speaker of an antique radio. Ishii believes there is aural magic in the combination of the very old with the very new. Playing an iPod through an old radio or tube-driven amplifier gives it a special warmth and atmosphere, he says."
Story

( Permalink: Aural Heaven: IPod and Analog       Submitted by Noel Thu Sep 16, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Linux and Windows security compared
(Mon May 31, 2004)

Multimedia/Internet Keyboards in GNU/Linux
(Mon May 31, 2004)

ipfilter on GNU/Linux: Is It Finally Here?
(Mon May 31, 2004)

Interview with Steven Edwards
(Sun May 30, 2004)

Top Ten Ethereal Tips and Tricks
(Sun May 30, 2004)

Compiling the linux kernel 2.2.12 on VME-PowerPC
(Sun May 30, 2004)

Subversion: The new-generation CVS
(Sun May 30, 2004)

Documenting Projects with Apache Forest
(Sun May 30, 2004)

The Python Enterprise Application Kit
(Sun May 30, 2004)

Building a Linux Media PC
(Sat May 29, 2004)

Violet Dal, the first emotional lamp
(Sat May 29, 2004)

Programming Class-less Classes
(Sat May 29, 2004)

Network Your Shell Scripts with Netpipes
(Sat May 29, 2004)

Managing Security for Mobile Users, Part 2
(Sat May 29, 2004)

What better way than to FindBugs
(Sat May 29, 2004)

The Hidden Treasures of IPTables
(Fri May 28, 2004)

SAX processing in Python
(Fri May 28, 2004)

Scripting GNU in the 21st Century
(Fri May 28, 2004)

Chrooting Apache
(Fri May 28, 2004)

Managing Security for Mobile Users
(Fri May 28, 2004)

Catching Some ZZZs
(Fri May 28, 2004)

Traffic shaping with trickle
(Thu May 27, 2004)

Sharp Zaurus SL-6000L Linux PDA
(Thu May 27, 2004)

Opera Browser on Linux
(Thu May 27, 2004)

How Linux Saved My Files and My Job
(Thu May 27, 2004)

Hardcore Java
(Thu May 27, 2004)

Build Web apps with Maypole
(Thu May 27, 2004)

Free Software and the Innovator's Dilemma
(Wed May 26, 2004)

A First Look at CodeWeaver's CrossOver Office 3.0
(Wed May 26, 2004)

Where should you use open source?
(Wed May 26, 2004)

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