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SimplyMepis 2004.01 Review
"SimplyMepis was originally designed to ship with the upcoming book "Point and Click Linux" by Rob Miller of Slashdot fame. This book intends to supply the user with an installable Linux LiveCD offering the best of desktop Linux applications. As such, SimplyMepis includes one office suite, one desktop environment and does its best to supply one application for each task, allowing it to fit comfortably under 2GB. This means that you have no package choices when installing the OS. However, being Debian-based, adding any of Debian's 10,000 is a snap."
Story

( Permalink: SimplyMepis 2004.01 Review      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 4, 2004 )

UNIX vs. Linux: A Vendor's Perspective
"All three of the vendors clearly recognize customers are looking at Linux though they do not actively solicit their own UNIX customers for migration to Linux. HP's Worldwide Linux Marketing Manager Daniel Gilfix said HP doesn't solicit its own customers because the workloads where UNIX offerings are usually deployed are not the typical proven and tested Linux sweet spots."
Story

( Permalink: UNIX vs. Linux: A Vendor's Perspective      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 4, 2004 )

What the bubble got right
"The exciting thing about the Internet is that it's shifting everything in that direction. The hard part, if you want to win by making the best stuff, is the beginning. Eventually everyone will learn by word of mouth that you're the best, but how do you survive to that point? And it is in this crucial stage that the Internet has the most effect. First, the Internet lets anyone find you at almost zero cost. Second, it dramatically speeds up the rate at which reputation spreads by word of mouth. Together these mean that in many fields the rule will be: Build it, and they will come. Make something great and put it online. That is a big change from the recipe for winning in the past century."
Story

( Permalink: What the bubble got right      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 4, 2004 )

Mono: A Developer's Handbook
"Mono is essentially an open source cross-platform implementation of Microsoft's .NET development framework and implements the API's which are standardized by ECMA. It is, however, not an exact clone. Besides providing a (partially implemented) stack that provides compatibility with Microsoft's .NET API's, Mono adds a whole new API-stack of its own, consisting of open source technologies such as the Gtk+ toolkit and the Gecko HTML rendering engine. This makes it possible to develop cross-platform applications based on open source technology while (mostly) compiling from a single code-base."
Story

( Permalink: Mono: A Developer's Handbook      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 4, 2004 )

Server Load Testing
I needed to test the effect of running an application on a loaded server (as opposed to applying load to a server with my applicaton). Since it was Friday, I decided to enjoy my work and create some scripts to bring the chosen box to its knees but not kill it. I almost lost the box (which was in another state) twice. I wanted to share my fun here.

( Permalink: Server Load Testing      Submitted by Fred Scott Thompson Mon Oct 4, 2004 )

Mac OS X for the Traveler
"Therefore, it's a good idea to carefully read your warranty before going on a trip and to pack all of the necessary papers with you. iBook and PowerBook users who chose to purchase an AppleCare Protection Plan will enjoy one of the best international support systems in the industry--a comforting thought. If you're not sure which plan you have or which one you should purchase with your next laptop, you can have a look here. Also, take the time to browse the Apple site from your country of destination and use the reseller locator to print a few addresses to keep with your warranty papers."
Story

( Permalink: Mac OS X for the Traveler      Submitted by Noel Sun Oct 3, 2004 )

ISCSI Storage - SAN's for the rest of us
"I did some investigation on the options available and the one that stood out the most was iSCSI. We have a mixed Linux/NetWare/Windows/AIX/Solaris environment so I needed a solution that would work with everything. Our file servers are all NetWare - NetWare's advanced file permissions don't jive with NAS so something that would appear as a locally attached disk to the server sounded good to me. Of course my Linux machines all have storage management internally and I didn't want to have to teach new management tools. iSCSI supports all of these operating systems. Cisco has released an open-source iSCSI initiator on SourceForge which takes care of the UNIX variants. NetWare and Windows both have vendor support for iSCSI (NetWare 6.5 is recommended)."
Story

( Permalink: ISCSI Storage - SAN's for the rest of us      Submitted by Noel Sun Oct 3, 2004 )

Authentication methods in OpenBSD
"In some installations, S/Key is the most common login method. It is used when no secure way to log in exists and a password must be entered in plain text. Examples would be FTP and Telnet, where the login is not encrypted at all. OpenBSD supports S/Key for numerous services including ftpd, telnetd. and sshd. The problem with tools like Telnet and FTP is that they use plaintext logins that pass over the network and can be sniffed. In contrast, services like sshd use encryption to send information without danger. Rather than using plain text, S/Key sends a challenge and the remote user sends back a response. This information is sent in plain text but it's one-time information and does not contain the password, so it does not pose any danger. "
Story

( Permalink: Authentication methods in OpenBSD      Submitted by Noel Sun Oct 3, 2004 )

Gentoo Linux 2004.2
"Gentoo Linux is the BSD of GNU/Linux distributions; it's elegant and customizable and you know exactly what you're getting when you install it. No mystery programs, no packages that you have to deinstall because you'll never use, no clutter, and everything is customized to your needs. If you do it right, Gentoo is also faster than your average GNU/Linux distro because everything can be compiled with higher compiler optimizations. The 2004.2 edition of Gentoo Linux lacks the improvements I had hoped to see, but this is still the best community GNU/Linux distribution for desktop tinkerers. Some even say that it makes a good server, too."
Story

( Permalink: Gentoo Linux 2004.2      Submitted by Noel Sun Oct 3, 2004 )

The future of Linux multimedia
"No, Linux desktops' multimedia capabilities are not on par with Windows' -- things are now at the point where Linux is preferable to Windows. Today the biggest Linux multimedia projects, like xine and MPlayer, are about to release full 1.0 versions, which means stable and powerful support. One of the net's biggest multimedia companies, Real Networks, has a brand new release of the ever-popular RealPlayer. Sound drivers via Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) are well into 1.0 status, giving us fully functional surround sound and a stable API. As for visuals, The two biggest video card manufacturers, ATI and nVidia, officially support Linux."
Story

( Permalink: The future of Linux multimedia      Submitted by Noel Sun Oct 3, 2004 )

Move Beyond Amateur Filmmaking
"Wanna be a filmmaker? Just grab your DV camera and start shooting, right? Well, if you want to produce something more professional than a glorified "home video," it's not that simple. After a decade of marketing, producing corporate videos and commercials, I was ready to make the leap into narrative filmmaking. With today's technology, all I had to do was grab a camera and go, right? Um, no. If your end game, like mine, is to create a "calling card"--that is, a short film to introduce yourself to the film industry or impress investors--you'll need something more professional."
Story

( Permalink: Move Beyond Amateur Filmmaking      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 2, 2004 )

Canadian Wireless Neighborhood Network
"Somewhere in Andrew's house is a hefty Linux server running many applications, including an Asterisk Open Source VoIP software PBX. There is no desktop PC in Andrew's house. Instead, he runs a Linux thin client on a Sharp Zaurus SL-6000 Linux PDA. Sitting in its cradle on Andrew's desk at home, the Zaurus (running a special copy of Debian Linux, NOT as shipped by Sharp) connects to a full-size keyboard and VGA display, and runs applications on the server. Another cradle, monitor and keyboard are at Andrew's office, where he also doesn't have a PC. Walking around in his house, the Zaurus (equipped with a tri-mode communications card) is a WiFi VoIP phone running through the Asterisk PBX and connecting to the Vonage VoIP network. Walking out of his house, the Zaurus automatically converts to the local mobile phone carrier, though with a data connection that still runs back through Vonage. At Starbucks, it's a Wifi Vonage phone. At Andrew's office, it is a WiFi extension to the office Asterisk PBX AND to Andrew's home PBX. That's one PDA doing the job of two desktop PCs, a notebook PC, and three telephones."
Story

( Permalink: Canadian Wireless Neighborhood Network      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 2, 2004 )

VMware Workstation 4.5.1
"You can install VMware Workstation 4.5.2 on either Windows or GNU/Linux, and earlier versions (before version 4.0) have native ports in FreeBSD. The supported guest operating systems for 4.5.2 are too many to list individually, but you can install various versions of Solaris, GNU/Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, and DOS. For this review I tested GNU/Linux as a guest operating system, but in the past I've installed Windows 2000 and Windows XP on version 4.0 and 4.5 using Fedora Core 2 and SUSE 9.1 Professional as hosts, and found the only problems to be exceptionally poor performance of the optical drive and a problem I never solved with printing from within Windows."
Story

( Permalink: VMware Workstation 4.5.1      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 2, 2004 )

Gaim-Encryption: Simple encryption for IM
"Gaim-Encryption is a Gaim plug-in that enables secure conversations over existing IM networks, and, like Gaim itself, Gaim-Encryption is available for most platforms. GNU/Linux users have a number of options, including non-official Debian sources, an RPM, or a tarball. Windows users can download the executable and install it normally"
Story

( Permalink: Gaim-Encryption: Simple encryption for IM      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 2, 2004 )

Challenges and Opportunities in Mobile Games
The Austin Game Conference has emerged as one of the primary conferences for game designers, developers, and entrepreneurs in North America. This year, more than 1400 professionals from over 350 companies attended the conference to discuss the technical and business challenges that face today's game industry.

( Permalink: Challenges and Opportunities in Mobile Games      Submitted by Anonymous Sat Oct 2, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Hackers & Painters
(Sun Jun 13, 2004)

Microsoft Should be Kicked Out of Schools
(Sun Jun 13, 2004)

Using Jabber as a log monitor
(Sun Jun 13, 2004)

Is the Linux Desktop Getting Heavier and Slower?
(Sun Jun 13, 2004)

Evolution of the Linux Credits file
(Sat Jun 12, 2004)

Four out of four experts agree: Linux lowers TCO
(Sat Jun 12, 2004)

Desktop FreeBSD: Adding Software
(Sat Jun 12, 2004)

Using MySQL for Exchange Rate Updates
(Sat Jun 12, 2004)

Time's up on clock speed
(Sat Jun 12, 2004)

Build a WAP gateway On Linux
(Sat Jun 12, 2004)

Rebuttal to Ken Brown
(Fri Jun 11, 2004)

Using Webmin for Linux Administration
(Fri Jun 11, 2004)

Open Source Scores Gnome Goal
(Fri Jun 11, 2004)

Custom System Statistics Monitoring
(Fri Jun 11, 2004)

Small Form Factor Box
(Fri Jun 11, 2004)

Encrypting partitions using dm-crypt
(Fri Jun 11, 2004)

A tutorial on vim
(Thu Jun 10, 2004)

Understanding Fear of the Gnu
(Thu Jun 10, 2004)

Best practices for storage security
(Thu Jun 10, 2004)

An inside look at the Gaming industry
(Thu Jun 10, 2004)

Securing the Wireless Enterprise
(Thu Jun 10, 2004)

Harry Potter sorcery done with Linux eServer
(Thu Jun 10, 2004)

VMWare Workstation 4.5 Review
(Wed Jun 9, 2004)

OpenBSD: Monolithic Simplicity
(Wed Jun 9, 2004)

Drive recovery comes to Linux
(Wed Jun 9, 2004)

Kernel 2.6 on a Hyperthreaded Pentium 4
(Wed Jun 9, 2004)

A Linux Implementation of Mobility Using SIP
(Wed Jun 9, 2004)

What You Need to Know When Developing a Grid App
(Wed Jun 9, 2004)

A Survey of DVD Recording Formats
(Tue Jun 8, 2004)

OpenBSD: no more apache updates
(Tue Jun 8, 2004)

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