# RootPrompt.org   Nothing but Unix.[Home] [Features] [Programming] [Mac OS X] [Search]

Interview with Red Hat Vice President
"What was your first introduction to Linux? What was the reason behind you using Linux and was anyone in particular responsible for turning you on to Linux? MT) My first introduction was via Adam Richter, creator of the Yggdrasil distribution. He called me up and took me to lunch one day, mainly to try to understand whether what I'd learned at Cygnus (the world's first company to commercialize free software) could be applied to the business he was thinking about starting. I didn't think so: we were selling support contracts for $35,000 to more than $1M per year, and he wanted to sell CDs for $99 (or perhaps even less). The two models could not have been more different."
Story

( Permalink: Interview with Red Hat Vice President      Submitted by Noel Thu Nov 18, 2004 )

Solaris format command
"To many, a hard disk is a "black box" and is thought of as a small device that somehow stores data, programs and/or an operating system. Nothing is wrong with this approach, of course, as long as that is all you care about. But as a system administrator, one of your primary concerns should be the protection of the data. Another concern way up there in the high-priority range should be the efficient movement of data between memory and the physical disk. In this article I would like to investigate one of the basic utilities that is available to us in the Solaris OS: format."
Story

( Permalink: Solaris format command      Submitted by Noel Thu Nov 18, 2004 )

TUX
"TUX is the first and only magazine for the new Linux user. Within the pages of TUX, we explore every facet of the modern Linux desktop, providing a new breed of Linux user with the tools and information to make their Linux desktop experience complete. TUX provides informative user columns with rich, graphical content and covers everything for home, work, and play. The magazine provides Linux users with easy to understand tutorials, insightful hardware and software reviews, enlightened opinion, useful tips and tricks, and in-depth exploration of the tools computer users need every day. Our style is hands-on, welcoming and non-threatening, speaking in a jargon-free style that everybody can understand."
Story

( Permalink: TUX      Submitted by Noel Thu Nov 18, 2004 )

Linux Virus Solutions in Search of a Problem
It's an insurance company's dream: Sell policies for something so unlikely to occur that you'll get to scoop up premiums and never have to pay out. That's pretty much what's going on with companies selling antivirus products for Linux. Joe "Zonker" Brockmeier submitted the following editorial to osOpinion/osViews which asks the question, "Are buyers of Linux antivirus software wasting their money?"

( Permalink: Linux Virus Solutions in Search of a Problem      Submitted by Kelly McNeill Thu Nov 18, 2004 )

The iMac G5: A PC user migrates to a Mac
"In my last article, I looked at the new iMac G5 from a Mac user's perspective. Apple pushes it as the kind of hardware one wouldn't mind having in one's living room for aesthetic reasons. My wife, the fashion maven, agrees -- so much so that after seeing the iMac G5, she looked at her battered but trusty Sony Vaio and declared, "I'm ready to switch.""
Story

( Permalink: The iMac G5: A PC user migrates to a Mac      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 17, 2004 )

Packaging SSH for Your Needs
"This Tech Tip is designed to help you create a widely usable package for SSH. With this package, it's easier to do updates and bug fixes, without impacting the operating system."
Story

( Permalink: Packaging SSH for Your Needs      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 17, 2004 )

Natural programming languages and environments
"Over the last six years, we have been working to create programming languages and environments that are more natural, or closer to the way people think about their tasks. Our goal is to make it possible for people to express their ideas in the same way they think about them. To achieve this, we have performed various studies about how people think about programming tasks, both when trying to create a new program and when trying to find and fix bugs in existing programs. We then use this knowledge to develop new tools for programming and debugging. Our user studies have shown the resulting systems provide significant benefits to users."
Story

( Permalink: Natural programming languages and environments      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 17, 2004 )

Knoppix
"However, after seeing some of the hacks that the author Kyle Rankin put together I became much more interested. Knoppix is an incredibly versatile tool, in that it is a convenient medium for carrying a bunch of other tools that let you do some insanely useful and sometimes just fun things. Of course, that is the whole purpose of a hacks book. The chapter I particularly enjoyed was Chapter 7: Resuce Windows. A collection of 9 hacks that showed me that even Windows users need a little bit of Linux in their life."
Story

( Permalink: Knoppix      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 17, 2004 )

Topologilinux - Drawn, Quartered and Reviewed.
Tired of VMWare's emulation slowing you down? Topologilinux has the solution. Rather than providing a virtual machine for Linux to run in, Topologilinux allows you to install itself into a single file on your Windows FS. This allows you to run the Slackware-based distro without spending the system resources on a VM. It's also useable as a stand-alone (or dual-boot) distro. Sound good? It's an excellent theory, though apparantley poorly implemented. So before you get all excited, check out LinuxForumsDOTorg's first hand review, where jeremy rips it apart.

( Permalink: Topologilinux - Drawn, Quartered and Reviewed.      Submitted by sarumont Wed Nov 17, 2004 )

Securing Linux, Part 2: Planning the installation
Only the paranoid survive, and that is no less true when securing Linux systems as any other. Fortunately, a host of security features are built into the kernel, are packaged with one of the many Linux distributions, or are available separately as open source applications. This second installment covers inventory assessment, risk analysis, identifying user categories and access privileges, and then moves on to a more detailed action plan and steps for safely acquiring a Linux distribution.

( Permalink: Securing Linux, Part 2: Planning the installation      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Nov 17, 2004 )

Setting the Clock on Linux
"There are 3 protocols dealing with time: NTP (port 123), Time (port 37), and Daytime (port 13). If you're connecting to the Internet periodically, then synchronizing your clock when you dial up or from crontab is good enough. This applies also to most Linux machines at home or at work, even if they are connected all the time. Here is a short tutorial on how to set your clock using these 3 protocols."
Story

( Permalink: Setting the Clock on Linux      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 17, 2004 )

Getting in Tune with AirPort Express
"Back in July, Apple started shipping the AirPort Express, what they're calling the world's first 802.11g mobile base station. It's a neat little device. Quite unimposing at a little larger than an iPod, it has a stark white appearance making it look like Apple's version of the monolith from 2001: A Space Oddessy. There are three jacks on what I will be calling the bottom of the device although there is no obvious up or down as far as the device itself is concerned. It has USB, Ethernet, and headphone and mini-optical jacks."
Story

( Permalink: Getting in Tune with AirPort Express      Submitted by Noel Tue Nov 16, 2004 )

Sun takes the wraps off of Solaris 10
"Sun has also reaffirmed its commitment to release the source code for Solaris 10 some time after the OS ships, as they announced in June of this year. By opening up the codebase for the OS, Sun hopes to spur interest in Solaris (and SPARC) which has flagged with the rise in popularity of Linux + 64-bit x86 CPUs. Having access to the source code will likely help developers, who will now be able to take advantage of some features of the OS that were previously unavailable to them."
Story

( Permalink: Sun takes the wraps off of Solaris 10      Submitted by Noel Tue Nov 16, 2004 )

Hardware Hacking Projects for Geeks
"Hardware Hacking Projects for Geeks, by Scott Fullam, has a lot of good things to offer. The book features a great selection of projects sorted by level of technical prowess and ability. These include a coffee machine with a Web server, a wearable computer and a video periscope for a car. For the larval hacker, Fullam provides a good overview of not only how to use mandatory tools such as a soldering iron and a multimeter, but also how to read electronic circuit schematics. For more advanced readers, the author provides jumping-off points at the end of each chapter, suggesting potential variations for each project. He also suggests methods of integrating several of the projects together."
Story

( Permalink: Hardware Hacking Projects for Geeks      Submitted by Noel Tue Nov 16, 2004 )

What is encryption?
"Data encryption has become a sad necessity for responsible data managers. However cryptography is jargon-heavy even by the discouraging standards of the IT world symmetric and asymmetric cryptosystems, public versus private keys, digital signatures, hash algorithms, RSA, DES, Rijndael, PGP, MD5, SHA-1, https, secure sockets, Camellia, IDEA; what does it all mean? What are the differences? Relative advantages and disadvantages? Hopefully this article will clear some of the fog."
Story

( Permalink: What is encryption?      Submitted by Noel Tue Nov 16, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Little Live Linuxes
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

Sharp's Zaurus SL-6000L: A Free Software PDA
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

Review: OpenBSD 3.5
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

Comparing Linux and AIX
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

SpinRite 6.0 for Linux Users
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

Go Straight To The Source with CTrace
(Fri Jul 23, 2004)

Securing Linux: What it means to be secure
(Fri Jul 23, 2004)

Changing the Parameters of a File System
(Fri Jul 23, 2004)

Training Ethical Hackers: Training the Enemy?
(Fri Jul 23, 2004)

IceWM - The Cool Window Manager
(Fri Jul 23, 2004)

Exploiting software: how to break code
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

VMWare Workstation 4.5.2
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

Book Review: SQL Pocket Guide
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

Microsoft heed a key lesson learned or suffer the
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

Well-structured, modular code in the Java language
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

SkyOS, the 7th Beta and Robert Szeleney
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

Multi-Boot Disk for AMD Opteron Processors
(Wed Jul 21, 2004)

Cryptography and the Open Source Security Debate
(Wed Jul 21, 2004)

SGI supercomputer to scale Linux to 1,024 CPUs
(Wed Jul 21, 2004)

GNU/Linux Clears Procurement Hurdles
(Wed Jul 21, 2004)

IBM launches POWER5-based p5 server line
(Wed Jul 21, 2004)

Using Linux To Burn CDs?
(Wed Jul 21, 2004)

12 Steps to Improving Your Mac's Performance
(Tue Jul 20, 2004)

Macworld Boston 2004: Brains Over Beauty
(Tue Jul 20, 2004)

Unix Printing Basics
(Tue Jul 20, 2004)

Why doesn't Academia understand Industrial Work?
(Tue Jul 20, 2004)

Boot Linux from a FireWire device
(Tue Jul 20, 2004)

Opening netwox toolbox
(Tue Jul 20, 2004)

Of Free Software and Zealots
(Tue Jul 20, 2004)

KDE 3.3 Beta1 Experiences
(Tue Jul 20, 2004)

[Latest News] [Newer News] [Older News]

Our content can be syndicated: Main Page Mac Page
(Validate RSS code)

Copyright 1999-2005 Noel Davis. Noel also runs web sites about sailing and kayaking.
All trademarks are the property of their owners.
All articles are owned by their author