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SQLite Tutorial
"This article explores the power and simplicity of sqlite3, first by starting with common commands and triggers, then the attach statement with the union operation is introduced in a way that allows multiple tables, in separate databases, to be combined as one virtual table, without the overhead of copying or moving data. Next, the simple sign function and the amazingly powerful trick of using this function in SQL select statements to solve complex queries with a single pass through the data is demonstrated, after making a brief mathematical case for how the sign function defines the absolute value and IF conditions."
Story

( Permalink: SQLite Tutorial      Submitted by Noel Mon Nov 22, 2004 )

GRUB boot diskette for Knoppix
"You can use a simple GRUB diskette that boots to a GRUB command line. From this command line, you can issue commands to boot your Knoppix on the non-bootable partition. This simple GRUB boot diskette can be prepared with the grub-floppy script. It is very quick to prepare, but does not carry a filesystem, so you cannot do much with it. You cannot write to it, and you will have to type quite a bit after booting to the GRUB prompt."
Story

( Permalink: GRUB boot diskette for Knoppix      Submitted by Noel Sun Nov 21, 2004 )

NASA's Columbia Altix Supercomputer
"One of the fastest Supercomputers was unveiled at Supercomputing 2004 in Pittsburgh last week. This is an exciting space to watch Linux grow. Everywhere you looked Linux was being used in various hardware configurations. The show rocked as it was a marriage of supercomputing solution providers and University research facilities to show what is being done with this computing power. You got to mingle with some scientists from all over the world and take a peek at their projects. Japan's 5,120-processor Earth Simulator was pretty cool, there was lots to see."
Story

( Permalink: NASA's Columbia Altix Supercomputer      Submitted by Noel Sun Nov 21, 2004 )

Boosting Your PowerBook's Battery
"Newer Technology and IGM sponsor Other World Computing have the world's most powerful PowerBook G4 battery, with a 30% improvement on a standard Apple battery. There are several models available, including a 48.8Wh battery ($109), which provides a 6% improvement, and the top-of-range 4800mAh model, that gives 42% more capacity - almost double - than the OEM battery ($149.99)."
Story

( Permalink: Boosting Your PowerBook's Battery      Submitted by Noel Sat Nov 20, 2004 )

Ease of use, nice look: Mandrake 10.1
"Released on the 8th of November, Mandrake 10.1 PowerPC version has been running on one of our test machine since then. It is time to write down some notes. Do not take this one as a review, these are just the opinions of a simple user. Ease of use and nice look, as I titled: these are the most remarkable qualities of this distribution. I found that many things have improved since I last installed Mandrake on a Mac, but there is some work still to be done to make the user experience almost perfect. "
Story

( Permalink: Ease of use, nice look: Mandrake 10.1      Submitted by Noel Sat Nov 20, 2004 )

Solaris 10 OS Feature Spotlight
"When a hardware fault occurs, predictive self-healing augments traditional syslog messages by issuing binary telemetry events that are then correlated by underlying software. The underlying software then automatically diagnoses the fault, notifies the administrator, and takes corrective action when possible. Sun's fault manager also provides a fault code and directs the administrator to the corresponding knowledge base article at http://www.sun.com/msg/ when appropriate. The first implementation of Sun's fault manager covers various SPARC CPU, memory, and I/O bus nexus components. A later release is scheduled to include modules for the Solaris OS on x86 platforms."
Story

( Permalink: Solaris 10 OS Feature Spotlight      Submitted by Noel Sat Nov 20, 2004 )

Software Tools of the future
What are the sofware tools of the future going to be? It's an interesting question, with many facets. Here are some important trends in design and construction tool strategy, which will effect the kinds of software tools that will bee delivered in the future. It looks at how to improve software development efficiency through visual modeling, generating code from abstract models, and systematic reuse.

( Permalink: Software Tools of the future      Submitted by Anonymous Sat Nov 20, 2004 )

Creating iPod Tattoos
"I loved the idea when I first heard it: a cheap and easy way to give my iPod a touch of personalization, so I kept my eye out for an opportunity to buy the paper. I found mine at the Santa Clara, California, Fry's, where a ten-pack of sheets cost me $15. Now came the fun of creating a graphic and printing it. Printing these things is more fraught with peril than you might think--the problem is getting the size of the graphic right and getting your software to print the graphic at the top of the page. There are easy ways to get it done, however."
Story

( Permalink: Creating iPod Tattoos      Submitted by Noel Fri Nov 19, 2004 )

OpenBSD 3.6 shows steady improvement
"The OpenBSD team earlier this month released version 3.6 of the free operating system, with support for more hardware, updated application software, and bug fixes included. This time around OpenBSD has added support for multi-CPU systems, a number of drivers for new peripheral hardware, and about 200 more applications to the Ports tree. We took the new version for a spin, and liked what we found."
Story

( Permalink: OpenBSD 3.6 shows steady improvement      Submitted by Noel Fri Nov 19, 2004 )

Linux is Not Red Hat, and Other Sun-isms Debunked
"Sun Microsystems head honchos Scott McNealy and Jonathan Schwartz often equate Red Hat with all of GNU/Linux. After interviewing both of them on Monday during the day-long Solaris 10 launch event in San Jose, I understood their frame of reference on this matter and many others much more clearly. For the first time in several releases, Solaris is actually a threat to the other players in the operating system market, but Sun's market outlook and publicity strategy may be working against the merits of Solaris 10."
Story

( Permalink: Linux is Not Red Hat, and Other Sun-isms Debunked      Submitted by Noel Fri Nov 19, 2004 )

How does amaroK r0X0rz?
"The second thing I like about amaroK stems from being able to not use arts, i.e., it's multiple multimedia engine framework. Currently amaroK supports gstreamer, NMM, MAS and xine and more is probably one the way. This has it's good points and it's bad points, but is more boon than bane in my opinion. On the plus side if one engine decides it want to be anal retentive today you can switch to another and not be arsed with trying to fix it. On the other hand playback of audio files is totally dependent on the engine. If the engine doesn't support it, amaroK can't play it."
Story

( Permalink: How does amaroK r0X0rz?      Submitted by Noel Fri Nov 19, 2004 )

The Status of the QNX OS
OS enthusiast Thom Holwerda gave a spin to the latest version of QNX RTOS, a very capbale OS that unfortunately doesn't get a lot of press. With the recent sale of QNX Software to Harman International the future of the free-for-personal-usage version of the RTOS is uncertain. Nevertheless, the article presents quite a few aspects of the OS, including an introduction of the Neutrino kernel, installation, the Photon MicroGUI, hardware support, usability and more.

( Permalink: The Status of the QNX OS      Submitted by Anonymous Fri Nov 19, 2004 )

Inside Memory Management
Memory management is one of the most fundamental areas of computer programming. In many scripting languages, you don't have to worry about how memory is managed, but that doesn't make memory management any less important. Knowing the abilities and limitations of your memory manager is critical for effective programming. Get an overview of the memory management techniques that are available to Linux programmers, focusing on the C language but applicable to other languages as well.

( Permalink: Inside Memory Management      Submitted by Anonymous Fri Nov 19, 2004 )

A survey of Dock substitutes
"Me, I like the Dock just fine. But I like it best when it's running alongside a couple of other utilities. Because when The Great Transition (from OS 9 to X) occurred for me I wasn't all that ready to give up my configurable Apple menu or my application switching menu. (And lo, two utilities called FruitMenu and ASM both came about, and they were good.) Between these two and an upgrade to Jaguar not long after, I was a happy user. When Panther came out, however, it broke both of these third party utilities. But I liked Panther. And what's more, I really needed to learn its ins and outs."
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( Permalink: A survey of Dock substitutes      Submitted by Noel Thu Nov 18, 2004 )

A glance at Gento 2004.3
"Installing Gentoo is easy for someone, difficult for someone else. My opinion is that if you follow to the word the instructions of the handbook you find on the LiveCD the installation will be succesfull and can be considered "easy". I say "easy" because for an expert Linux user it is easy to follow the steps, understend them and tweak the installation to customize it where needed/wanted; for the beginner it will be easy to follow those steps too, but will probably be a mere paste of what's on the well-done handbook. Well, it is to mention that all the installaton process could be a good start point for the novice who is willing to understand some common mechanisms and commands of Linux distributions."
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( Permalink: A glance at Gento 2004.3      Submitted by Noel Thu Nov 18, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Malware: fighting malicious code
(Tue Jul 27, 2004)

Visualize your data with gnuplot
(Tue Jul 27, 2004)

Microsoft Dividend is Good for Linux
(Tue Jul 27, 2004)

An Interview with Hideya Kawahara
(Mon Jul 26, 2004)

ELX BizDesk 4.0
(Mon Jul 26, 2004)

Real wants to be the media player for Linux
(Mon Jul 26, 2004)

Canon PowerShot A60 on Fedora Core 2
(Mon Jul 26, 2004)

Linux tips
(Mon Jul 26, 2004)

Grady Booch's dinner with Scott Ross
(Mon Jul 26, 2004)

Tool of the Month: rpl
(Sun Jul 25, 2004)

Thoughts on secure operating systems
(Sun Jul 25, 2004)

Linux command line tips and tricks
(Sun Jul 25, 2004)

How to harden GNU/Linux against local intrusions
(Sun Jul 25, 2004)

Call of Duty
(Sun Jul 25, 2004)

How to Misunderstand the Enterprise Linux Desktop
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

Little Live Linuxes
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

Sharp's Zaurus SL-6000L: A Free Software PDA
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

Review: OpenBSD 3.5
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

Comparing Linux and AIX
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

SpinRite 6.0 for Linux Users
(Sat Jul 24, 2004)

Go Straight To The Source with CTrace
(Fri Jul 23, 2004)

Securing Linux: What it means to be secure
(Fri Jul 23, 2004)

Changing the Parameters of a File System
(Fri Jul 23, 2004)

Training Ethical Hackers: Training the Enemy?
(Fri Jul 23, 2004)

IceWM - The Cool Window Manager
(Fri Jul 23, 2004)

Exploiting software: how to break code
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

VMWare Workstation 4.5.2
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

Book Review: SQL Pocket Guide
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

Microsoft heed a key lesson learned or suffer the
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

Well-structured, modular code in the Java language
(Thu Jul 22, 2004)

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