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High-performance SQL
"While the number of rows populating the database schema may have been adjusted to scale, one area remains the same: SQL. In this article, you walk through the logic of the TPC-C benchmark, gain an understanding of the SQL technology, and discover how it can be used in real customer environments. To accomplish this, author Serge Rielau, has organized the article as follows: First by introducing the benchmark’s DB schema and its transactions. Next, he will analyze each transaction and explain the SQL features of each. Overall, at the end of this article, you should have a better understanding of the TPC-C benchmark as well as DB2’s advanced SQL features, including the philosophy behind them."
Story

( Permalink: High-performance SQL      Submitted by Noel Fri Dec 3, 2004 )

Knoppix Hacks: Reviewed.
Oreilly's Hacks series is one of the more popular in the IT world. It's newest installment, Kyle Rankin's Knoppix Hacks, is no exception. Knoppix is a handy Linux LiveCD distro, booting and running strictly from the CDROM (or RAM). It has been praised by techies for its usefulness in fixing broken boxen running any OS. lakerdonald from Knoppix Hacks. Read it here.

( Permalink: Knoppix Hacks: Reviewed.      Submitted by sarumont Fri Dec 3, 2004 )

Install XAMPP for easy, integrated development
Open source stacks such as XAMPP from Apache Friends are simplifying open source development by making it easier to write and distribute applications in a stable and standardized environment. Traditionally, AMPP -- Apache, MySQL, PHP, and Perl -- have all been installed and configured as separate products. The trend of combining them into integrated middleware stacks promises to make open source development more competitive with J2EE application development, at least for low-end applications.

( Permalink: Install XAMPP for easy, integrated development      Submitted by Anonymous Fri Dec 3, 2004 )

Three Books On The iPod
"The first impression you get of O'Reillys iPod Fan Book is of the packaging. A small volume (about the same height as the iPod and twice the width) it comes with a half-height wrap that has the title and author on the front and the bar code, price and a short contents on the back. Take this off and you have a full-size cover with all the simple elegance of the white iPod itself. The front features the wheel of a 4G iPod and the back has just the Apple logo and "iPod" in Apple's distinctive typeface below it. Remove this second cover and you have a book with a simple design of grey with a white border, the back is blank and the front has the title and the subtitle "Go everywhere with iPod" in small type."
Story

( Permalink: Three Books On The iPod      Submitted by Noel Thu Dec 2, 2004 )

Why Install Linux on Your Mac?
"My friend was not at all relaxed when faced with Mac OS X. Why couldn't she right-click on things? Why couldn't she copy-and-paste? (Using the Control key is something wired into her fingers -- when I pointed out the Command key, she just laughed and said it was ridiculous to have another modifier key to learn). There were other confusions, but all of it boiled down to the fact that, as a lifelong Windows user, Mac OS X was completely alien, but consumer-level Linux felt almost the same."
Story

( Permalink: Why Install Linux on Your Mac?      Submitted by Noel Thu Dec 2, 2004 )

From honeypot to bot in minutes
"During the experiment's run, both the PC running XP SP1 and the Mac saw about 340 attacks per hour. However, none of the attacks against the Mac amounted to anything, while the PC was successfully compromised nine times during the two-week experiment. The PC running SBS was hit 61 times per hour, and was ultimately hijacked. The machines with firewalls and the Linspire box saw fewer than four attacks per hour, none of which were successful. There's nothing like going for the low-hanging fruit."
Story

( Permalink: From honeypot to bot in minutes      Submitted by Noel Thu Dec 2, 2004 )

Be geek, watch a movie
"It is a media player. Or better: it is an operating system that fits in a 6 MB ISO and based on the 2.6 Linux kernel (at least for version 0.98 I tested) and the great mplayer media player most of you know. You simply burn the ISO and you get a bootable CD that will recognize most of your hardware (in my case it recognized all of that): video card and its tv-out, sound card and cd/dvd-rom and hard disks. It does not supply a console, but just a menu (look at the screenshots we made and those provided on the project's homepage) with a good range of choices."
Story

( Permalink: Be geek, watch a movie      Submitted by Noel Thu Dec 2, 2004 )

History of Linux
"In 1991, Linus Benedict Torvalds was a second year student of Computer Science at the University of Helsinki and a self-taught hacker. The 21 year old sandy haired soft-spoken Finn loved to tinker with the power of the computers and the limits to which the system can be pushed. But all that was lacking was an operating system that could meet the demands of the professionals. MINIX was good, but still it was simply an operating system for the students, designed as a teaching tool rather than an industry strength one."
Story

( Permalink: History of Linux      Submitted by Noel Thu Dec 2, 2004 )

Wireless on the Road
"A few preparations before you leave home may help a lot down the road. Test your wireless card thoroughly. If you don't have a wireless network at home, work or school, try to find a local Internet cafe. You don't want to be diagnosing the problems of an unfamiliar network when you're not even sure if your card's driver works or if your hotplug setup is handling PCMCIA cards properly."
Story

( Permalink: Wireless on the Road      Submitted by Noel Thu Dec 2, 2004 )

TLP: Design Decisions
Ace's Hardware has published TLP: Design Decisions, the third part in a series on Thread Level Parallelism. The article takes an in-depth look at the advantages and disadvantages of threaded processors for a variety of different market segments: including desktops, workstations, and servers. There's also a detailed discussion of microarchitecture in threaded processor implementations.

( Permalink: TLP: Design Decisions      Submitted by Brian Neal Tue Nov 30, 2004 )

Anywhere Access
The increasing demand from our users to provide ‘Anywhere Access’ to our most sensitive business systems; allowing them to connect from any computing device across any public Internet or wireless link, is forcing us to take an entirely new approach to securing our networks and data.
Story

( Permalink: Anywhere Access      Submitted by LogError Tue Nov 30, 2004 )

The State of Open Source in the Enterprise
All over the world there are conversations happening about “The State of Open Source” in various areas. Invariably, most participants will boil these down to two hard facts: on the consumer desktop, Open Source has made very little headway but in the corporate market it is gaining strong footholds. read more

( Permalink: The State of Open Source in the Enterprise      Submitted by Scott Tue Nov 30, 2004 )

JBL Civil War: Creature vs. Duet
"In the past few years, JBL has quickly become the speaker manufacturer of choice for many Mac users. Their sleek design, good price, great sound, and availability in Apple stores have spiked their growth. However, visitors to the aforementioned stores will be faced with a choice: Duet or Creature? For those who like to compare numbers, here's how they stack up:"
Story

( Permalink: JBL Civil War: Creature vs. Duet      Submitted by Noel Mon Nov 29, 2004 )

Building A Linux Filesystem From An Ordinary File
"You can take a disk file, format it as an ext2, ext3, or reiser filesystem, and then mount it, just like a physical drive. It's then possible to read and write files to this newly-mounted device. You can also copy the complete filesystem, since it is just a file, to another computer. If security is an issue, read on. This article will show you how to encrypt the filesystem and mount it with ACL (Access Control Lists), which gives you rights beyond the traditional read (r), write (w), and execute (x) permissions for the three user groups "file", "owner", and "other"."
Story

( Permalink: Building A Linux Filesystem From An Ordinary File      Submitted by Noel Mon Nov 29, 2004 )

SSH and ssh-agent
"No one likes typing passwords. If people had their way, computers would simply know who they were and what they should have access to without us proving it at every turn.[1] In my last article I showed you how to create SSH Identities/Pubkeys, which can be used as an alternative to password authentication. However, I then went right back and told you to passphrase protect them, so now you were substituting one password for another, seemingly gaining nothing."
Story

( Permalink: SSH and ssh-agent      Submitted by Noel Mon Nov 29, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Authentication and Authorization for Webapps
(Wed Aug 4, 2004)

Yellow Dog Linux on Power Mac G5
(Wed Aug 4, 2004)

Easy GUIs for Swing apps and web portlets
(Wed Aug 4, 2004)

POWER5 Performance Brief
(Tue Aug 3, 2004)

Creating Really Teensy ELF Executables
(Tue Aug 3, 2004)

VMware vs. Virtual PC
(Tue Aug 3, 2004)

Linux Volunteer Work in Nicaragua
(Tue Aug 3, 2004)

Network Troubleshooting Tools
(Tue Aug 3, 2004)

Getting Started with PHP's HTML_QuickForm
(Tue Aug 3, 2004)

Porting VB Applications to Linux and Mac OS X
(Mon Aug 2, 2004)

Spam Filtering for Mail Exchangers
(Mon Aug 2, 2004)

Turbo Linux 10f Review
(Mon Aug 2, 2004)

New World Record for Bluetooth Link
(Mon Aug 2, 2004)

A Taste of Computer Security
(Mon Aug 2, 2004)

The Official DOOM 3 Hardware Guide
(Mon Aug 2, 2004)

Feather Linux Mini Review
(Sun Aug 1, 2004)

Linux Takes on Windows Gaming
(Sun Aug 1, 2004)

What is new in GNOME 2.8?
(Sun Aug 1, 2004)

Optimizing Build Times Using Parallel make
(Sun Aug 1, 2004)

Digital Hub Concepts in Enterprise Software, Pt 4
(Sun Aug 1, 2004)

Autonomic Linux: Patrick Patterson of Nitix
(Sun Aug 1, 2004)

FreeBSD source keyword statistics
(Sat Jul 31, 2004)

Connect KDE apps using D-BUS
(Sat Jul 31, 2004)

Data Integrity – The Unknown Threat
(Sat Jul 31, 2004)

Bringing Linux to Nicaragua
(Sat Jul 31, 2004)

Local company develops FreeBSD-based radars
(Sat Jul 31, 2004)

Plug n Play progress in Linux
(Fri Jul 30, 2004)

Four alternative Linux window managers
(Fri Jul 30, 2004)

Secure programming with the OpenSSL API
(Fri Jul 30, 2004)

A BSD For Your PHB
(Fri Jul 30, 2004)

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