# RootPrompt.org   Nothing but Unix.[Home] [Features] [Programming] [Mac OS X] [Search]

Exploring the Mac OS X Firewall
"All Unix systems have a firewall. But on the Mac, it's installed by default and you can't turn it off. To keep things simple, and keep users from having to build their own firewall rules, OS X packages the firewall as a sub-menu of Sharing within System Preferences. The benefit of this approach is that the firewall can be tied to services. Turn on Personal Web Sharing, for example, and a new rule appears in the firewall to control access to the service."
Story

( Permalink: Exploring the Mac OS X Firewall      Submitted by Noel Mon Mar 21, 2005 )

Track Of The Day On Garageband.com
"Last week, as an experiment, I uploaded to garageband.com a song by an independent country artist whose CD I produced. Given that there are thousands of artists on the site, I assumed that not much was likely to happen, but I was interested in learning about how garageband works. Tomorrow (March 17, 2005), that song will be featured on garageband's home page as track of the day. This happened because in the course of a few days the song leapt from the bottom of their country charts, down around about #1800, to #35. "
Story

( Permalink: Track Of The Day On Garageband.com      Submitted by Noel Mon Mar 21, 2005 )

Interview with Hurd developer Marcus Brinkmann
"Nikolaos S. Karastathis: Do you remember the first non-trivial program you created by yourself? What was it?
Marcus Brinkmann: I am not sure, but I remember writing a small mathematical trainer program on the Commodore 64, where you had an ASCII Art mountain scape in the background and a skier sprite in the foreground, and everytime you answered a simple math question correctly (like, 7+5) the driver would go through one of the slalom goals. That must have been when I was in elementary school."

Story

( Permalink: Interview with Hurd developer Marcus Brinkmann      Submitted by Noel Mon Mar 21, 2005 )

Booting with runit
"Runit is a rewrite of D.J. Bernstein's daemontools, and the basic concept is service supervision. A supervised service has a small process (the supervisor), which knows how to start the service, how to clean up if it goes down, and whether the admin wants the service up or down. This has some obvious advantages. If the application happens to crash, the supervisor will restart it. The supervisor is small enough that the odds of it crashing are very small, and if it happened, there are ways to manage that, too."
Story

( Permalink: Booting with runit      Submitted by Noel Mon Mar 21, 2005 )

Inside GnomeMeeting
"Damien Sandras says his programming philosophy is "the UNIX way:" designing individual programs that do unique tasks well and interoperate with one another, instead of one program that attempts to do several tasks that other programs already do. His GnomeMeeting is a voice-over-IP (VoIP) and video-over-IP application for Linux that builds upon open source libraries and open telephony standards."
Story

( Permalink: Inside GnomeMeeting      Submitted by Noel Mon Mar 21, 2005 )

Password Cracking and Time-Memory Trade Off
"Now, after 5-10 years of refining, bruteforcing has proved it's success. Meanwhile the world of encryption has grown aware of it's weaknesses. Hashing algorithms have been revamped to overcome certain problems, such as collisions, to ensure their existence and usability. A result of this effort made by the world of encryption has decreased the usefulness of bruteforcing. To make it worse, even the corporations have caught on, enforcing password policies and expirations. "
Story

( Permalink: Password Cracking and Time-Memory Trade Off      Submitted by Noel Mon Mar 21, 2005 )

Linux Kernel: Process Segments
"Under Linux, a process can execute in two modes - user mode and kernel mode. A process usually executes in user mode, but can switch to kernel mode by making system calls. When a process makes a system call, the kernel takes control and does the requested service on behalf of the process. The process is said to be running in kernel mode during this time. When a process is running in user mode, it is said to be "in userland" and when it is running in kernel mode it is said to be "in kernel space". We will first have a look at how the process segments are dealt with in userland and then take a look at the bookkeeping on process segments done in kernel space."
Story

( Permalink: Linux Kernel: Process Segments      Submitted by Noel Sat Mar 19, 2005 )

Getting Started with a TV Tuner Card
"Watching my beloved Orioles play is one of my favorite summertime activities. Unfortunately for me, my family doesn't share my passion for the Birds. After having to choose one too many times between heading upstairs to watch TV or remaining downstairs to use the computer, I had an idea. I decided to get one of those nifty TV tuner cards. A quick virtual trip to newegg.com confirmed that I could choose among several in my price range. At the time, though, it was the end of baseball season, so I shelved my plans for a while."
Story

( Permalink: Getting Started with a TV Tuner Card      Submitted by Noel Sat Mar 19, 2005 )

Synchronizing PalmOS devices with Linux
"Smart handheld devices or personal digital assistants (PDA) extend our access to the information on our desktops, from addresses to telephone numbers. Unfortunately, when it comes to vendor support for synchronizing this information with a *nix operating system, the options are limited. In this article, we'll review the various GPL-based suites available for synchronizing PalmOS-based devices with Linux."
Story

( Permalink: Synchronizing PalmOS devices with Linux      Submitted by Noel Sat Mar 19, 2005 )

An Embedded View of the Mac Mini
The Mac Mini isn't just competition for Shuttle computers and mini-tower PCs. It's also competition for the much smaller embedded development boards that many users are building custom applications around. Peter Seebach takes a look at the Mac Mini as an embedded development platform.

( Permalink: An Embedded View of the Mac Mini      Submitted by Anonymous Sat Mar 19, 2005 )

Secure Batch Email with UUCP and SSH
"As I started a new company, I was stranded for a few weeks (thanks to the local telco and the company registration office) with no ADSL link, no optical fiber link, and no leased line to the Internet. The only thing that remained for me to use was my trusty old USR 33.6Kbps dial-up modem and a dial-up account. We greatly needed communication, with email the most pressing need. So I sat down and started to think about what I could do to solve this problem."
Story

( Permalink: Secure Batch Email with UUCP and SSH      Submitted by Noel Thu Mar 17, 2005 )

Create your own Live Linux CD
These steps will show you how to create a functioning Linux system, with the latest 2.6 kernel compiled from source, and how to integrate the BusyBox utilities including the installation of DHCP. Plus, how to compile in the OpenSSH package on this CD based system. On system boot-up a filesystem will be created and the contents from the CD will be uncompressed and completely loaded into RAM -- the CD could be removed at this point for boot-up on a second computer. The remaining functioning system will have full ssh capabilities. You can take over any PC assuming, of course, you have configured the kernel with the appropriate drivers and the PC can boot from a CD.

Create your own Live Linux CD

( Permalink: Create your own Live Linux CD      Submitted by Mike Chirico Thu Mar 17, 2005 )

Multi-core and multi-threaded gaming
"Tim Sweeney: There are two parts to implementing multithreading in an application. The first part is launching the threads and handing data to them; the second part is making the appropriate portions of your 500,000-line codebase thread-safe. OpenMP solves only the first problem. But that's the easy part - any idiot can launch lots of threads and hand data to them. Writing thread-safe code is the far harder engineering problem and OpenMP doesn't help with that. "
Story

( Permalink: Multi-core and multi-threaded gaming      Submitted by Noel Thu Mar 17, 2005 )

IBM outs dual-core PowerPC
"This week it emerged that Apple's hardware performance testing tools had been modified for the 970MP, although there was still no official confirmation of the chip's existence from IBM. The tools also include support for quad-processor systems, which makes sense if Apple is planning twin dual-core systems: these would likely appear to Mac OS X as four processors not two."
Story

( Permalink: IBM outs dual-core PowerPC      Submitted by Noel Thu Mar 17, 2005 )

A moment of Xen
Xen is a paravirtualization technology available for the Linux kernel that lets you enclose and test new upgrades as if running them in the existing environment but without the worries of disturbing the original system. This article shows you how to install a Xen system that will give administrators a valuable sandbox for testing system upgrades (as well as a playground for running multiple virtual machines on the same Linux box).

( Permalink: A moment of Xen      Submitted by Anonymous Thu Mar 17, 2005 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Beginning Perl, 2nd Ed.
(Thu Nov 25, 2004)

CentOS 3.3 is a good Red Hat server alternative
(Wed Nov 24, 2004)

Remaster Knoppix without Remastering
(Wed Nov 24, 2004)

Linux MIDI: A Brief Survey
(Wed Nov 24, 2004)

Install KNOPPIX LiveCD on Hard Drive
(Tue Nov 23, 2004)

Entrap: A File Integrity Checker
(Tue Nov 23, 2004)

Extending Ruby with C
(Tue Nov 23, 2004)

The Definitive Guide to MySQL, 2nd Ed.
(Tue Nov 23, 2004)

My workstation OS: Mepis Linux
(Mon Nov 22, 2004)

Issues Discovering Compromised Machines
(Mon Nov 22, 2004)

K3b—Easy CD Burning Program for Linux
(Mon Nov 22, 2004)

SQLite Tutorial
(Mon Nov 22, 2004)

GRUB boot diskette for Knoppix
(Sun Nov 21, 2004)

NASA's Columbia Altix Supercomputer
(Sun Nov 21, 2004)

Ease of use, nice look: Mandrake 10.1
(Sat Nov 20, 2004)

Solaris 10 OS Feature Spotlight
(Sat Nov 20, 2004)

Software Tools of the future
(Sat Nov 20, 2004)

OpenBSD 3.6 shows steady improvement
(Fri Nov 19, 2004)

Linux is Not Red Hat, and Other Sun-isms Debunked
(Fri Nov 19, 2004)

How does amaroK r0X0rz?
(Fri Nov 19, 2004)

The Status of the QNX OS
(Fri Nov 19, 2004)

Inside Memory Management
(Fri Nov 19, 2004)

A survey of Dock substitutes
(Thu Nov 18, 2004)

A glance at Gento 2004.3
(Thu Nov 18, 2004)

Interview with Red Hat Vice President
(Thu Nov 18, 2004)

Solaris format command
(Thu Nov 18, 2004)

TUX
(Thu Nov 18, 2004)

Linux Virus Solutions in Search of a Problem
(Thu Nov 18, 2004)

Packaging SSH for Your Needs
(Wed Nov 17, 2004)

Natural programming languages and environments
(Wed Nov 17, 2004)

[Latest News] [Newer News] [Older News]

Our content can be syndicated: Main Page Mac Page
(Validate RSS code)

Copyright 1999-2005 Noel Davis. Noel also runs web sites about sailing and kayaking.
All trademarks are the property of their owners.
All articles are owned by their author