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Jakub Stachowski: Zeroconf Support in KDE
"Last month's release of KDE 3.4 was the first to feature Zeroconf's service discovery. Relevant applications can advertise their services, such as shared folders or networked games, which can then be browsed with the zeroconf:/ ioslave. KDE Dot News spoke to the man behind KDE's Zeroconf support Jakub Stachowski to find out more on this exciting technology."
Story

( Permalink: Jakub Stachowski: Zeroconf Support in KDE      Submitted by Noel Mon May 2, 2005 )

Converting e-Books to Open Formats
"Practically no tools exist now to export e-book formats to PDF or OpenDocument, the new OASIS standard used in OpenOffice.org, but this is not necessarily a big deal. Once text is in ASCII or HTML format, it easily can be moved to plain-text or PDF format by using a text browser such as w3m or programs such as html2ps. If you go this route for conversion, you are able to do it today, and because it's an open format, 20 years from now too."
Story

( Permalink: Converting e-Books to Open Formats      Submitted by Noel Mon May 2, 2005 )

Apple bumps Power Mac line, cuts LCD prices
"Apple Computer Inc. today refreshed its line of desktop computers, offering a new top-end Power Mac that sports dual 2.7-GHz G5 processors, a new graphics card from ATI and a new 16x SuperDrive that can burn data to double-layer DVDs. Apple also unveiled a new dual 2.3-GHz G5 model as its midrange dual-processor desktop computer and continues to sell two models it had offered before: a single 1.8-GHz G5 Power Mac for $1,499, and the dual 2-GHz G5 model, which now sells for $1,999 -- a $500 price reduction for that version."
Story

( Permalink: Apple bumps Power Mac line, cuts LCD prices      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 28, 2005 )

PowerMac line refreshed
"Apple has announced a refresh of the PowerMac G5 product line. Specs are in line with predictions, prices are unreformed and Tiger is the default OS."
Story

( Permalink: PowerMac line refreshed      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 28, 2005 )

PC-BSD - a user-friendly BSD system
"Have you ever wondered why there is no easy-to-install desktop BSD operating system with automatic hardware detection and setup? If so, you'll be pleased to learn that things are about to change in this respect - courtesy of PC-BSD. Designed as an "easy-to-install-and-use operating system", this FreeBSD-based system comes with a graphical installer and automatic hardware detection - features that have never been seen in the BSD world!"
Story

( Permalink: PC-BSD - a user-friendly BSD system      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 28, 2005 )

Hardening the OS with help from Uncle Sam
" Until today, Bastille could only harden or "lock down" systems. It did this by deactivating unnecessary operating system components and better configuring the ones that remained. It took proactive steps to make a system harder to compromise, reducing the probability that the next item in the attacker's toolkit will be successful against your system."
Story

( Permalink: Hardening the OS with help from Uncle Sam      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 28, 2005 )

Designing a Course in Linux System Administration
"As you probably can tell, it has been my mission to make Linux more widely accepted on our campus. A colleague from the computer science department, Dr. Kenny Moorman, and I ran a Linux class in our May term a few years ago. May term is a short four-week semester that runs, coincidentally enough, during the month of May. I am running the class again this May. My goal is to try to teach the course in such a way that our students can integrate their PCs into our existing framework. "
Story

( Permalink: Designing a Course in Linux System Administration      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 28, 2005 )

KDE Kiosk: Battening Down the Hatches
"The KDE Kiosk is a framework that has been built into the K Desktop Environment (Fig. 1) since version 3. It allows administrators to create a controlled environment for their users by customising and locking almost any aspect of the desktop which includes the benign such as setting and fixing the background wallpaper, the functional such as disabling user log outs and access to the print system and the more security conscientious such as disabling access to a command shell."
Story

( Permalink: KDE Kiosk: Battening Down the Hatches      Submitted by Noel Thu Apr 28, 2005 )

What if you could add a GPS chip to anything?
What's the easiest way to ensure that GPS tracking technology doesn't become the tool of an evil elite? Make sure everyone has access to it! For people already thinking along these lines, the availability of tracking technologies such as RFID tags and (GPS) chipsets is confirmation that we're all living in a Panopticon. The saving grace is that the CIA and the Trilateral Commission don't have a monopoly on these technologies -- maybe we can turn a world of mass observation to our benefit.

( Permalink: What if you could add a GPS chip to anything?      Submitted by Anonymous Thu Apr 28, 2005 )

Enforcing a Two Man Rule Using Solaris 10 RBAC
"The content and examples below will include references to both normal users and roles. In the Solaris OS, roles are similar to normal user accounts with two important differences. First, a role cannot be accessed directly over the network or from the console. You can only use the su(1M) command (or smc(1M)) to assume a role. In either case, a user must first authenticate to the system as himself before attempting to access a role. Secondly, a role can only be assumed by authorized users. That is, before a given user can assume a role, an administrator must assign that role to the user otherwise attempts to access the role will fail. Both of these restrictions are important for preserving accountability and will factor quite heavily in our implementation of the two man rule in Solaris 10."
Story

( Permalink: Enforcing a Two Man Rule Using Solaris 10 RBAC      Submitted by Noel Wed Apr 27, 2005 )

Microsoft Word to OpenOffice.org Writer
"First, don't worry; you won't have much trouble adjusting to OpenOffice.org Writer. The interface isn't terribly different; the menu and toolbar layout are similar to Word's. If you prefer a custom display you'll be much happier with Writer, as it doesn't have a lot of the annoying Word features that people often disable. If the first thing you do when you install Word XP is disable personalized menus and eliminate the superfluous and space-hogging task pane, you'll find it easy and convenient to switch over to Writer."
Story

( Permalink: Microsoft Word to OpenOffice.org Writer      Submitted by Noel Wed Apr 27, 2005 )

Enabling TCP Wrappers in Solaris 10
"First let's first provide a little background. TCP Wrappers has been around for many, many years (see Wietse Venema's FTP archive). It is used to restrict access to TCP services based on host name, IP address, network address, and so on. For more details on what TCP Wrappers is and how you can use it, see tcpd(1M). TCP Wrappers was integrated into the Solaris Operating System starting in the Solaris 9 release, where both Solaris Secure Shell and inetd-based (streams, nowait) services were wrapped. Bonus points are awarded to anyone who knows why UDP services are not wrapped by default."
Story

( Permalink: Enabling TCP Wrappers in Solaris 10      Submitted by Noel Wed Apr 27, 2005 )

Housecleaning Tips for Tiger
"We never really analyzed our approaches to determine which one was more efficient over the long haul, but to this day I remain addicted to clean installs on an annual basis. Since Apple has been releasing new versions of Mac OS X on a similar cycle, I've used the pending upgrade as an excuse to tidy up before installation. That will be my approach with Tiger, and that's what this article is about."
Story

( Permalink: Housecleaning Tips for Tiger      Submitted by Noel Wed Apr 27, 2005 )

Interview: Danny McPherson, Arbor Networks
OrangeCrate is pleased to announce an interview with Danny McPherson of Arbor Networks, the driving force behind the cyber attack Fingerprint Sharing Alliance initiative. This important initiative seeks to address the problems of ISPs sharing of information to mitigate the propagation of viruses, worms, DDoS attacks and other malware.

( Permalink: Interview: Danny McPherson, Arbor Networks      Submitted by Chuck Talk Wed Apr 27, 2005 )

Is it an iPod or portable storage?
"But wait, there's more. He backs up all the office data twice. The first backup goes to USB drives there in the office. No big deal, but here's where it gets interesting. The second backup goes to his Apple iPod. That's right, his iPod. He says he can then plug it into his home network and consult with both patients and other medical professionals from home. He says his iPod has room for every digital thing in his office with space left over for 5,000 songs."
Story

( Permalink: Is it an iPod or portable storage?      Submitted by Noel Tue Apr 26, 2005 )

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Older News

Linux and Security at Salem Hospital
(Thu Jan 6, 2005)

The Independent Qt Tutorial
(Thu Jan 6, 2005)

SimplyMepis 2004.06 or: Gnome Guy Goes KDE
(Wed Jan 5, 2005)

Review: Thunderbird 1.0
(Wed Jan 5, 2005)

Migrating from x86 to PowerPC
(Wed Jan 5, 2005)

Get J2EE architecture and design answers
(Wed Jan 5, 2005)

Graphical Scripting with Kommander
(Tue Jan 4, 2005)

Useful Things You Can Do with FVWM
(Tue Jan 4, 2005)

Flickr and Perl
(Tue Jan 4, 2005)

Linux AMD64 Kernel Bug
(Mon Jan 3, 2005)

Memory issues in Linux
(Mon Jan 3, 2005)

Linux stateful firewall design
(Mon Jan 3, 2005)

Clever Tricks with MythTV
(Mon Jan 3, 2005)

Does Linux Have Game?
(Mon Jan 3, 2005)

ParallelKnoppix
(Sat Jan 1, 2005)

A bit about the NX bit
(Sat Jan 1, 2005)

Networking for Embedded Systems
(Sat Jan 1, 2005)

The Year 2004 in Microprocessors
(Sat Jan 1, 2005)

Rise and Evolvement of the Machines
(Fri Dec 31, 2004)

LINUX SYSTEM CALL HOWTO
(Fri Dec 31, 2004)

A Month Later -- Mandrake 10.1 Official reviewed.
(Thu Dec 30, 2004)

An Invitation to SETL
(Thu Dec 30, 2004)

The Mother of All CPU Charts
(Thu Dec 30, 2004)

Derby database development with Apache Ant
(Thu Dec 30, 2004)

Pogo Linux Altura64 Workstation
(Thu Dec 30, 2004)

Interview with Richard Thieme
(Wed Dec 29, 2004)

Visual Studio 2005's disregard for social dynamics
(Wed Dec 29, 2004)

The Graphing Calculator Story
(Tue Dec 28, 2004)

Backing up your MySQL data
(Tue Dec 28, 2004)

Listen to the Music with KsCD!
(Tue Dec 28, 2004)

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