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Which Older Macs Are Good Candidates for Tiger?
"What type of Mac would you want to run Tiger on? I'd guess that Apple's pretty much right in cutting off Macs at the FireWire/no FireWire point. While Tiger will probably function fairly well on some of the non-FireWire PowerBooks (a 400 MHz Lombard should run it decently), the slower iMacs would probably choke on Dashboard, and the 300 MHz iBooks with their slow video chips and low screen resolution would make the Tiger experience rather disheartening."
Story

( Permalink: Which Older Macs Are Good Candidates for Tiger?      Submitted by Noel Tue May 17, 2005 )

Linux and Mac OS X, all on one PowerBook?
"Mac OS X is built of two components, Darwin, the BSD-based Unix underpinnings, and Aqua, the beautiful graphical user interface we Mac heads have all grown to love. However, there are other operating systems and other work environments that can be installed on an Apple system, based on popular open source Linux applications. If youíre looking for Intel-based versions of Linux, there are dozens and dozens, but the PowerPC chip cuts those options down quite a bit. I decided itíd be interesting to install the most popular Linux for PowerPC - Yellow Dog 4.0 - and an up and coming Debian-based Linux distro thatís getting quite a bit of buzz in the community: Ubuntu Linux."
Story

( Permalink: Linux and Mac OS X, all on one PowerBook?      Submitted by Noel Tue May 17, 2005 )

Fourth Commandment of system administration
"The role of system administrator is a role of details. Heavily used and updated servers are filled with details, from new tables in a database to root password changes. These details need to be documented. When you are managing three servers, these details can be easy enough to remember. However, when you have 30 or 50 or 100 servers, the details become impossible to keep track of without documenting them. When it matters, you don't want to think that the IP address of that old accounting server is 192.168.10.55, you want to know it."
Story

( Permalink: Fourth Commandment of system administration      Submitted by Noel Tue May 17, 2005 )

Simplify Network Programming with libCURL
"curl's inner workings use the libCURL client library. So can your programs, to make them URL aware. libCURL-enabled tools can perform downloads, replace fragile FTP scripts, and otherwise take advantage of networking without any (explicit) socket programming. The possibilities are endless, especially with libCURL using a MIT/X-style license agreement."
Story

( Permalink: Simplify Network Programming with libCURL      Submitted by Noel Tue May 17, 2005 )

Optimizing Desktop Performance
"For most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. In effect, the default workstation that has evolved has existed mostly for developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. It performs similar to many UNIX workstations, which can seem slow for many knowledge workers. In this article, we look at the Linux desktop in a slightly different light."
Story

( Permalink: Optimizing Desktop Performance      Submitted by Noel Tue May 17, 2005 )

PowerPC Development from the Bargain Basement
The Kuro Box promises something fairly interesting: a usable single-board PowerPC computer, for only US$160 -- when other PowerPC development boards often cost ten times as much. Peter Seebach guides you through setup and install in this hardware howto.

( Permalink: PowerPC Development from the Bargain Basement      Submitted by Anonymous Tue May 17, 2005 )

IBM's 320,000 Bloggers coming soon
IBM is planning to introduce what could be the largest corporate blogging initiative so far, in a bid to encourage its 320,000 staff to become more active in online tech communities. The world's largest computer company has prepared a broad range of programs and online materials that staff can access to find out how they can start to blog. Behind the scenes, a small handful of technical innovators developed and deployed an internal blogging service that has grown in a period of just 18 months to just shy of 9,000 registered users spanning 65 countries, 3,097 individual blogs, 1,358 of which are considered active, with a total of 26,203 entries and comments -- all of which has been put together strictly through word-of-mouth promotion. And it's still just a pilot.

( Permalink: IBM's 320,000 Bloggers coming soon      Submitted by Anonymous Tue May 17, 2005 )

20 Cool Tiger Features
"But that's not all there is to Tiger. The major features have nuances that haven't gotten much press, and there are a zillion minor tweaks to discuss. My goal in this article is to explore 20 new Tiger tips that you probably haven't heard about before. Even if you've had the opportunity to play with Tiger yourself, I bet you'll discover some new tricks herein."
Story

( Permalink: 20 Cool Tiger Features      Submitted by Noel Mon May 16, 2005 )

Setting up a Secure Subversion Server
"My first thought was Subversion, as it is the revisioning system I used with my editor when writing BSD Hacks A search for subversion in the Ports Collection indicated that there are also several related ports. For example, esvn looked like an excellent match for the client, as this GUI front end works from Unix, Mac OS X, and Windows. That's perfect for a web development team short on Unix skills who would be accessing data stored on a FreeBSD server from non-FreeBSD operating systems."
Story

( Permalink: Setting up a Secure Subversion Server      Submitted by Noel Mon May 16, 2005 )

Combating Spam
"Spam is back in the news, and it has a new name. This time it's voice-over-IP spam, and it has the clever name of "spit" (spam over Internet telephony). Spit has the potential to completely ruin VoIP. No one is going to install the system if they're going to get dozens of calls a day from audio spammers. Or, at least, they're only going to accept phone calls from a white list of previously known callers."
Story

( Permalink: Combating Spam      Submitted by Noel Mon May 16, 2005 )

Jes Hall Talks About KDE's Documentation
"Jes Hall is a new contributor to KDE's documentation team. In the interview below she talks about how she joined the team, how KDE's documentation is made, how you can help them and how they can help KDE's coders. She also reveals the 5 finest examples of documentation in KDE. "
Story

( Permalink: Jes Hall Talks About KDE's Documentation      Submitted by Noel Mon May 16, 2005 )

MusE: MIDI Sequencing for Linux
"Frank Neumann, a 36-year-old computer scientist from Karlsruhe, Germany, and one of the developers of MusE, sums up the current state of music production applications for Linux: "It's always a nice warm feeling when you show an application like MusE to people and they just go, 'Whoa--I didn't know Linux audio stuff was already this far!"
Story

( Permalink: MusE: MIDI Sequencing for Linux      Submitted by Noel Mon May 16, 2005 )

Open-source divorce for Apple's Safari?
"In an e-mail seen by CNET News.com, a leading Apple browser developer suggested that architects of the KHTML rendering engine--the heart of a browser--consider abandoning the KHTML code base, or "tree," in favor of Apple's version, called WebCore. KHTML was originally written to work on top of KDE (the K Desktop Environment), an interface for Linux and Unix operating system"
Story

( Permalink: Open-source divorce for Apple's Safari?      Submitted by Noel Fri May 13, 2005 )

At the Sounding Edge: Introducing seq24
"In this month's column, we look at the seq24 MIDI sequencer to see how you can use it in a Linux-based MIDI music production system. Given working ALSA and JACK installations, this system is easy to set up and use, great fun and a valuable production tool. Feel free to follow along while I walk through some of the program's basic techniques and introduce some not-so-basic procedures before taking my leave."
Story

( Permalink: At the Sounding Edge: Introducing seq24      Submitted by Noel Fri May 13, 2005 )

Making plans with GanttProject
"Although on first sight GanttProject may seem like a rather simplistic application, it hides many useful features that make it suitable for a wide range of project planning activities. If you were writing a thesis or a book, for instance, you could use GanttProject tools to develop its basic structure, and then create a timetable for it. If you run a small business, GanttProject can help you plan both long-term projects and daily tasks. Moreover, GanttProject allows you to share your projects with other users, which makes it a good tool for workgroups."
Story

( Permalink: Making plans with GanttProject      Submitted by Noel Fri May 13, 2005 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

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Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

The Power Architecture Challenge
(Tue Jan 25, 2005)

Arch Linux 0.7 Released
(Tue Jan 25, 2005)

Missing the point of the Mac Mini
(Mon Jan 24, 2005)

Dual Booting Linux on a Mac
(Mon Jan 24, 2005)

O'Reilly's Linux Unwired Reviewed.
(Mon Jan 24, 2005)

Installing Firestarter on Linux Mandrake 10
(Mon Jan 24, 2005)

Itanium: Emulated PA-RISC vs Native Binaries
(Mon Jan 24, 2005)

Emulation and cross-development for PowerPC
(Sun Jan 23, 2005)

Privacy
(Sun Jan 23, 2005)

Yoper: A next-generation OS?
(Sun Jan 23, 2005)

Zap Java bugs before they bite with PMD
(Sun Jan 23, 2005)

My workstation OS: NetBSD
(Sat Jan 22, 2005)

Review: ELX Power Server 1.0
(Sat Jan 22, 2005)

Installing Debian From Scratch
(Fri Jan 21, 2005)

Speak to me, Linux
(Fri Jan 21, 2005)

Zsh Suite of keeper Functions
(Fri Jan 21, 2005)

Linux MIDI: A Brief Survey, Part 4
(Fri Jan 21, 2005)

Coming Soon To A Fridge Near You: Unix
(Wed Jan 19, 2005)

Installing a Sun FC-Fabric SAN-Booted System
(Wed Jan 19, 2005)

A Linux Island in a C:\ of Windows, Part 2
(Wed Jan 19, 2005)

Bitten By the aKregator
(Wed Jan 19, 2005)

DB2 Problems
(Tue Jan 18, 2005)

A Sneak Peek at GNOME 2.10
(Tue Jan 18, 2005)

Build an Open Source Network Sniffer
(Tue Jan 18, 2005)

VidaLinux 1.1
(Mon Jan 17, 2005)

Mini-Howto for User Mode Linux:
(Mon Jan 17, 2005)

Optimize Debian packages for your system
(Mon Jan 17, 2005)

Get Groovy with JDBC programming
(Mon Jan 17, 2005)

KMail In Depth
(Sun Jan 16, 2005)

Format Wars
(Sun Jan 16, 2005)

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